"Murdering Trees"...(Kevin Bingham)

treevet

Well-Known Member
Hey Treebing...I take down a lot of trees...set up to do the one in the pict tomorrow, yesterday a 80 foot stone dead eab ash, and a few days before a giant 45" plus dbh oak that had 2 emergency calls in the last 2 months...and although the stem was solid, the top was riddled with decay and dead wood and un correctable co doms. I just don't feel ever like I am "murdering trees" like you said on a vid with Nick Bonner.

Anyone else feel this guilty in routine removals.

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frashdog

Well-Known Member
No guilt here... For cutting trees down. I wholly love what I am blessed with for an occupation and even get a feeling of honor when cutting down a big tree. More will grow, plant some trees if one feels guilty.

I do love trees. I still look at them two ways for a customer. If they love them, pay me to take care of them. If they hate them, pay me to take them down.

Guilt is owned by choice. It's not healthy to own a lot of guilt.
Reminds me of a study I heard about slutty women and guilt. If your honestly ok with your behavior, is there really anything wrong when no one else gets hurt.

I do how ever own a bit of guilt for being a modern human and what that means for the future of our planet. I try to live my life in a way to deal with that guilt.

I have a bachelors degree in environmental science,it is a sad state we have allowed things to get to by choosing the disposable, easy, uneducated or even who cares routes in life. Do you think the average Walmart and McDonald shopper feels guilt for their roles in life. Nope. All they give a shit about is that the pacifier right now never comes soon enough or cheap enough.

Humans live around trees...
 
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macswan

Well-Known Member
I feel a sort of guilt for killing trees. It's a living organism and I am ending its life to collect stained paper. It's fucked up, but it is the system I live in. And until societal collapse comes and gives nature back the reins. I choose to do this job because it's interesting. I much more enjoy pruning than Killing. .i don't lose sleep over it, but I do consider taking other routes on occasion. There are worse things.
 

frashdog

Well-Known Member
I feel a sort of guilt for killing trees. It's a living organism and I am ending its life to collect stained paper. It's fucked up, but it is the system I live in. And until societal collapse comes and gives nature back the reins. I choose to do this job because it's interesting. I much more enjoy pruning than Killing. .i don't lose sleep over it, but I do consider taking other routes on occasion. There are worse things.
I feel no guilt killing a living organism in order to be a human. That's what we do. I embrace it. That said, I'll do my killing with as much info as I can gather about my choice, then respect and honor the fallen. I won't hesitate a second to cut the throat of any animal I'm about to eat...guilt free.
 

Nish

Well-Known Member
The link took me to the rope runner.

If your honestly ok with your behavior, is there really anything wrong when no one else gets hurt.
A particular act might not hurt anyone, but if it's recognizably of a kind that collectively brings about a repulsive outcome (tree-denuded neighborhoods, the empowerment of bad politicians, severe climate change, etc.) then you likely should feel guilt about it--even if you're "honestly ok with your behavior."
 

John_KAYS

Well-Known Member
Usually the trees we remove are not fit for this world. I don't even feel like Dr. Kevorkian because the patients I'm helping die usually are trying to kill others before their life is ended. I do feel down about removing a healthy, beautiful specimen 100+ years etc. We will tell the owner about the trees health, risk, value, awesomeness, and other alternative options before we take down a completely healthy tree. If a homeowner is worried about their safety I don't usually have a problem taking the tree down, as it is not worth the nervous strain etc. Nobody can say that a tree, even a completely healthy tree, won't fall and squish the living daylight out of the poor family below. :)
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
One of the more interesting mental pictures I have seen in my days was while driving down I95 to Fla. one time and off to the side was a small house with a GIANT dying tree next to it. The house was obviously built UNDER the tree for shade (possibly damaging the root system unknowlingly). There were NO other homes within eyesight. You could see the house under the tree had been abandoned and just out of reach of the HUGE dying tree...another small home had been built...likely by the guy and some friends.

Be nice if that was possible in the real world, but it isn't. Trees have a finite life span and combine that with their ability to fall apart often because of tree care neglect, makes tree removal/culling inevitable. I try to save any tree I encounter as a first option and work from there. The huge oak we removed had cables all over it and some just hanging loose. A cabled tree is often akin to a large truck that has been in a major collision and then driven without considering the damage done and safety issues caused by the wreck. Cables often CAUSE limb failure.
 
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easyphloem

Well-Known Member
Cables often CAUSE limb failure.
Is this your opinion? Or did you read that somewhere.

I would agree that incorrectly installed cables can CAUSE limb failure. If the BMPs are followed, I would disagree with your opinion that cables often CAUSE limb failure. But what do I know?

SZ
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
Often the tree just doesn't set up to give the proper support to the limb you are trying to support for obvious reasons...but often the cables are just put in anyway. Also often they are put in outside of standards, then they fail, and the resultant "throw" of the limb released causes detachment. The "barn door" effect is another example.

Very surprised...seeing you commented...you did not go for your usual personal attack...kudos.
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
nncy2.jpg nancy.jpg The lady with the latest big dia oak just sent me these pictures. This tree had 6 cables in it and NONE were actually functional. They were probably fairly kosher re standards...but they did little to support either entities. 2 cables were just hanging and one of then had a huge 5/8 J lag bolt just hanging from the eye and swinging in the wind...could have killed one of us or anyone in a wind if it blew out and fell 60 or so feet.

This tree had so many issues and large decayed spots from stems blowing out or just detaching. In the last 3 months we had 3 emergency calls to this property, one of which was a thousand pound limb that missed the roof and front walk by a foot.

The limb over the wires was over 75' up and just in reach of my 75' bucket to hand pick apart.
 

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
I don't associate my job with murdering of a living being. I do however feel badly when shitty tree work is done. I'd rather remove than hack the tree into some obscure shape that the customer feels is aesthetically pleasing. Either do it properly or remove it. Having said that, if I never do another removal I'd be happy as a clam. I've always had a dream of having a tree service that only does pruning and preservation of trees. No removals, no log truck, no loaders, no stump grinders. I would not do any removals unless it was part of a pruning job that interfered with the tree being preserved. Unfortunately there is no market for it here. Think of the cost savings due to reduced equipment needs. Mid sized chip truck, 18" to 20" chipper and basic tools, no big saws. Maybe a rear mount bucket. Would be nice. Maybe a retirement option. Just enough income to sustain the biz and a little cash in my pocket. Employee's would be the tough part. Probably not enough income to retain quality guys trying to make a living.
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
I am obviously having trouble with the posting mechanisms be they what they currently are. But yeah, if you could just prune wouldn't that be like a plumber only doing pipes and won't touch a toilet because of the offensive nature of it? I enjoy the yin and yang of caring for trees (having studied extensively to be able), and being amazing at removals to give complete service. Soft side and hard side...fits my personality to a T.
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
Gotta get back to work as it stopped raining. Removing tree pictured by house with crane in front yard as it is inches from foundation and (surprise) their foundation in basement and above is cracking RIGHT there. Big Ch. Elm (fkn weed) and growing by the minute.

Thought I'd throw a little entertainment to my thread before leaving....

 

123Craig

Active Member
Got my start as an arborist doing fine/ornamental small/medium scale pruning. Now I do mostly larger removals. I don't think any of us would be in this job if we didn't love trees. I think the hunter/fisher analogy sums it up; Do the best hunter's not respect their prey? - This is a cool topic that you don't often have the time to discuss with your colleagues during the busy day: often times I'll be up in the tree, just pondering if it's lived longer than I, the elements/weather it's seen, it's strength, it's flexibility, it's self sufficiency, it's beauty, how it chooses how it grows...

I'm actually fine with removing most of them. All things are born and all things will die. Sometimes I think that we are like trees.
 

frashdog

Well-Known Member
The link took me to the rope runner.



A particular act might not hurt anyone, but if it's recognizably of a kind that collectively brings about a repulsive outcome (tree-denuded neighborhoods, the empowerment of bad politicians, severe climate change, etc.) then you likely should feel guilt about it--even if you're "honestly ok with your behavior."
There is a vid of Kevin there.

And no I should not have to feel a lick of guilt on behalf of all the tree huggers.

As the sluts should not have to feel guilt on behalf of some one else judging them.
 
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