MS 200T Mods

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Administrator
I was recently talking to a guy at the Paul Bunyan show that gave me some great ideas about how he modifies 200 Ts. I am really interested in the concept and am hoping that he sees this post and replies. If anyone reading this has any info on this, I'd love to learn some more.
 

TreeDr

Active Member
One rain day, I replaced the piston and cylinder on my 020t. I port and polish the cylinders on my moto bikes, so I decided to do it to my 020. There is a bit of grinding to do to the intake and exhaust ports to open them up, also the rubber intake boot. I did it with no regrets. Runs like a raped ape.

Also, the first thing my guys do when they are issued a new 020 is remove the spark arrestor screen.

The lighweight bar with the carbon insert is something I love also, because my old wimpy arms aint what they used to be.
 

Mangoes

Well-Known Member
Under what circumstances have you had the opportunity to: a) see an ape get raped and b) then see the ape run?

/forum/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 

klimbinfool

New Member
Tree Dr...how long have you been running you saw that way ? ...and what more HP do you think you got out of that by doing so . I have been wanting to do it to some of my larger saws...is there any info on a web site or something that will show a person how. Been intrigued , but didnt no quite what to do .

Thanks

Greg
 

cory

Well-Known Member
Mark, why not talk to your boys at Stihl about making the mods it needs at the factory, then guys won't have to mess with it to get everything out of it. Also, I can't get my to run consistently...clean air filter etc, but it needs little carb. adjustments all the time, and only seems to run perfect now and again...is it me or is that a common thing? Thanks for your input.
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Administrator
I've got to say that I have hadgood luck with my 200Ts. I just take out the spark arrestor and then run 'em. Mine runs great as is. I've had some issues like the little dampness around the tank vent but that's about it.

The problem with the mods are that they won't pass the emission laws- especially in some states.

The Stihl guys in Ohio ran a couple of modified 066s. That was pretty cool. They were screaming.
 

TreeDr

Active Member
I understand your pain. My new blower is the same way. It seems that when they switched to carbs without the high adjustment, its been a pain in the rear. Somedays ok, other is bad. The boys at Stihl are just trying to conform to the new (and future) laws the EPA has on emissions.

The new 4-stroke wackers are out. I don't see 'em flying off the shelf until we have to use 'em.

Its the same thing with motocross. The new bikes are all 4 strokes.... a bit heavier, but better on the environment.

Wait 'till the new 020 4-stroke is the only climbing saw from Stihl. It will be as heavy as the 020av, but Sierra Club friendly. Liberal bastados!!!

I love the smell of premix in the morning!! 2-stroker for life!!
 

ptar

Member
My 200T seems to run a bit on the lean side from the sound of it.
I can't tell for sure since the high speed screw
is already all the way out.
Wide open rpm is a tad over 14000 but I don't know what it should be.
The saw is stock and was bought in California.
 

stevebullman

Active Member
[ QUOTE ]
Mark, why not talk to your boys at Stihl about making the mods it needs at the factory, then guys won't have to mess with it to get everything out of it. Also, I can't get my to run consistently...clean air filter etc, but it needs little carb. adjustments all the time, and only seems to run perfect now and again...is it me or is that a common thing? Thanks for your input.

[/ QUOTE ]

what 2-stroke oil are you using cory
 

klimbinfool

New Member
Steve,

Are you moving up and down in elevation? I know i do quite a bit and that throws my adjustments out all the time. Also I have found that the needle (float)whatever you want to call it , is sometimes set to low and the carb is starving at the hi end. I have had to re-adjust those to .

Greg
 

Axman

New Member
Is taking the spark arrestor screen really such a good idea on a chain saw? Going against popular opinion on this one, I know. This would be the first thing I would do to a new saw, but after doing some brushing up on how a two cycle funtions, the screen might have two funtions. Starting some kind of urban forest fire isn't a big concern to me, but when the air fuel mix is scavenged back into the combustion chamber for the compression,combustion part of the cycle the screen acts like an exhaust filter to keep sawdust and dirt outside the muffler from being pulled into the muffler and possibly into the engine.

Does pulling the screen out really make that big of a difference or do we just think the saw runs better because the screen isn't there to restrict exhaust flow?

I'm not enough of a saw expert to really say one way or the other, just raising a question is all. It seems that most damage done to pistons is on the exhaust side so leaving the screen in might be a good thing. If the damge is cominng from inside the muffler with the screen stiil in then the problem is else where in the saw.

Just my two cents for what it is worth.

Larry W.
 

treefarmer

New Member
My experience with them as been more of the inconvience of when they plug. I either have no torch to clean them up. I have found my little butane torch i carry for sodering wires does the job nicely. I have had the experience of the things filling with condensation and ice, I used to cut survey lines in northern Manitoba. The combination of snowmobile ride and being set down to clear branches away caused problems. Fruit tree wood really plugs them up
 

Kevin

Well-Known Member
Larry;
The screen on my 335 was continually being fouled by carbon, I haven't noticed a problem with any of my other saws and the screens remain.
Dirt entering the the cylinder through the muffler is still a concern to me but with the pressure of the exhaust blowing out through the muffler and the exhaust opening facing down I don't think it's a problem.
 
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