mites on a hemlock??

oldoakman

Well-Known Member
Good photos Twig. Probably Hemlock Wooly Adelgid. Pretty wide spread pest. Local Extension should be able to give you the best advice.
 

twig

Member
the lady really wants to save this tree. I heard soapy water can rid these. looking for different options.
 

oldoakman

Well-Known Member
Ag Extension office. Land Grant universities have information offices for public education. If you aare outside the US they mighe be called by another name. If you use a soap, it would have to be a horticultural soap, not dish soap or the like. Also the critters would need to be active and you would have to get good coverage since the soap actually suffocates them. Hope this helps.
 

coveforest

New Member
Normally it is not life threatening but if combined with other stressors could be deadly. Scale insects are challenging to treat. Oils are your best bet as they suffocate the insect. Hope that helps.
 

treegazer

Member
Elongate Hemlock Scale.
A Safari trunk spray is effective.
Spraying a whole tree with hort oil or anything else and getting good coverage on the underside of the foliage is near impossible to obtain control of the pest.

Lepitect is also labeled for scale. Lepitect is formulated two ways, one can be applied as a soil injection, the other as a trunk injection.

Treat now and again in the spring. Be warned, two applications of Neonicitinoid insecticides (Safari) will result in an explosion of spider mites which will lead you to the Lepitect treatment (The only systemic labeled to control mites).

Go with the Lepitect treatment now and monitor the new growth next year. If there are scale on the new foliage, you will need to treat again. Try the Safari as the second treatment if needed, then back to Lepitect if a third treatment is required.

READ AND FOLLOW THE LABEL
There are also predator insects you can release depending on your climate.

Check for other abiotic stressors. Deep planting, girdling roots, poor draining soil, root loss/injury.
 
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Gorman

Well-Known Member
Elongate Hemlock Scale.
A Safari trunk spray is effective.
Spraying a whole tree with hort oil or anything else and getting good coverage on the underside of the foliage is near impossible to obtain control of the pest.

Lepitect is also labeled for scale. Lepitect is formulated two ways, one can be applied as a soil injection, the other as a trunk injection.

Treat now and again in the spring. Be warned, two applications of Neonicitinoid insecticides (Safari) will result in an explosion of spider mites which will lead you to the Lepitect treatment (The only systemic labeled to control mites).

Go with the Lepitect treatment now and monitor the new growth next year. If there are scale on the new foliage, you will need to treat again. Try the Safari as the second treatment if needed, then back to Lepitect if a third treatment is required.

READ AND FOLLOW THE LABEL
There are also predator insects you can release depending on your climate.

Check for other abiotic stressors. Deep planting, girdling roots, poor draining soil, root loss/injury.
This is interesting. Why would a double dose lead to a spider mite explosion? Do the scales keep the mites in check?
 

treegazer

Member
Don't really know why. I've seen it with boxwoods and hemlocks. Perhaps someone else knows the science behind it.
 

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
High populations of mites can threaten the well-being of plants. However, they are also part of the normal phylloplane flora and are essentially never a problem in native stands of trees or herbaceous plants. Pest control experts have long known that many insecticide treatments, say for aphid control, kill non-target predators that help regulate mite populations. So for the aphid example, soaps reduce pest populations without messing up the predator population (more or less).
Yes, the image looks to be elongate scale. There is a lot of online info on that. Treegazer gives the critical info: "Read and Follow the Label" directions.
 

jed1124

Active Member
If you do a bark application of Safari or Transtect at the high rate you probably won't have to do another application for 2-4 years. The chemical is only active for 3 months but it takes a while for the population to come back.
 
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