Maasdam Failure

RyTheTreeGuy

Active Member
Hello All,

Just wanted to see if anyone else has had a failure with their Maasdam. We had a 30" Norway Maple today that had a large lead coming off the rear, towards the house. There was approx 60-70 % of the crown weight on the back side. No significant lean, but needed a solid pull and wedging to move the CoG a fair distance. We needed a floating re-direct in order to get the proper tension and be able to anchor the Maasdam. As we were making the back cut and pulling...very close to being fully cut up the Maasdam had a major failure and severed off one of the teeth and damaged a couple of more. Had we not been backing it up with double wedges I am concerned that the tree could have sat back on the stump hard and snapped the hinge backwards into the house. Long story short...I have lost all faith in the Maasdam and will always have this in my mind if or when we ever use one near property again.
 

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evo

Well-Known Member
Yikes! That is a common failure with any kind of prawl or dawg like that. It’s not exclusive to the massdam, and shows the limitations of using a system which requires that style of dawg.

What happens is the dawg hangs up on the ratchet tooth and doesn’t fully seat. This needs to be inspected each time weight is set, otherwise exactly what you experienced can happen. Some devices use two prawls to help prevent this, but the only fix is to ALWAYS have a backup, this can be a prussic, a second line, etc..

Personally I’ve never like the looks of them so haven’t bought one.
 

RyTheTreeGuy

Active Member
We will be bringing it back to the retailer as well as contacting the manufacturer via email with some pictures. Also will be building simple and compound (5:1, 9:1) mechanical advantage systems in the future. Have never had a problem with pulleys and prusiks
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
I've had teeth break. Also had rope slip when it was worn. A backup prussic is a great idea, as well as wedges. I've never had a handle collapse, even with two people pulling on one.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
I had one 'fail'. Pulling a big block of wood from backlean over a fence. It was a fir over 3 feet in dia and had some side limbs still attached which added weight and torque. Always back up as stated above (especially since Masdam is a low quality tool - as pointed to above.) The rope slipped and would not pull with more force. Tied another rope to the pull rope, reduced friction on the cut a bit with a couple of side wedges, problem solved.

I totally trust my Masdam and when it fails like I trust it will, I will have my back up measures in place and a new replacement sitting in the tool shed. :)

Ohh, that reminds me, I collapsed my first Masdams handle too.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
My preference for critical pulls is to piggy back the MA system on the pull rope. This takes a bit more work and fiddling around but isolates the MA.
 

CjM

Member
Sounds scary. Anymore, we use the grcs or 5:1, but when using the Masdam, we always used to tie overhands every few feet as the rope came through the device.
 

Benjo75

Member
I've used them for years with no problem but I don't push it's limits. Anything that takes more than 1000 lbs or so I'll use the GRCS or tractor or winch. I've often watched the connection between the hook and the body and wondered how much it would take to pull it apart. Mine will slip until I get about 100 lbs on the rope. The more I pull the tighter it gets.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
Easy to attach 2:1 if you're really pushing it.


Looks like it wasn't engaged. Operator needs to be sure that the machine is working right.


Always back up with wedges. Always. Good job on being prepared.
When you're pulling really hard, while the puller is pulling, the faller can beat wedges...more than back-up.

Wedges move huge weight.


By wedgeS, you don't have to stop at 2.
 

ßrit

Member
Does anyone have pictures using their maasdam, either showing a prussic backup or an MA system in place?
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
No picture...

I'd probably clip a prussic loop into the integrated hook. KISS.


For MA, use one rope through the Maasdam as a 2:1 on the main pull rope.

It will look like a "Y" with the termination of the Maasdam Rope on an anchor point (Running Bowline on a tree), run through a pulley and back to the Maasdam.

Hitch the anchor sling side of the pulley to main pull rope. Keeps the pulley/ block from coming down with the tree, as it would if you anchored the pulley/ block to the tree.


Does that make sense?
 
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southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
P.S.


I find it useful to use a 1-10 scale for the puller and the wedge pounder.

PULLER: I'm giving it a 5 out of 10 on the puller. (measuring how hard the pulling person can pull)

Sawyer/ wedger: Pull more

P: I'm giving it a 7-8.
S/W:let me beat the wedges a bit more, cut it up thinner a bit.

S/W: pull more

P: more like a 6-7 now.


and on...





Personally, I've considered redirecting the puller back to the stump so I can cut/ wedge/ pull things myself. Who's better at it all, me or the groundman?



You can't tension while you cut, but you can hang a log on the sloping part of the line to keep tension up while the tree moves.
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
P.S.


I find it useful to use a 1-10 scale for the puller and the wedge pounder.

PULLER: I'm giving it a 5 out of 10 on the puller. (measuring how hard the pulling person can pull)

Sawyer/ wedger: Pull more

P: I'm giving it a 7-8.
S/W:let me beat the wedges a bit more, cut it up thinner a bit.

S/W: pull more

P: more like a 6-7 now.


and on...





Personally, I've considered redirecting the puller back to the stump so I can cut/ wedge/ pull things myself. Who's better at it all, me or the groundman?



You can't tension while you cut, but you can hang a log on the sloping part of the line to keep tension up while the tree moves.
More than once I have used a pulley to redirect and parked my truck right next to the tree I was dropping so I could jump back and forth between cutting and pulling with the truck.
 

New2trees

Active Member
I have seen all kinds of tooth/dawg based pullers fail, as a kid and young man lots of people used them to pull motors above ones head (yikes) as said always back the mechanical with a second system of some sort.

Also agree in this case it looks like a partial engagement was the culprit....but I am no Injunear.

Also keep in mind with the long handle its real easy to exceed the load rating of the unit....I think the long handle gives many a false sense of safety.
 
The massdam that i acquired at work for jacking small wire is for light duty jobs only. Their WLL isnt meant for heavy loading.we use chain hoists ,trucks and winchs for real loads
 

dmonn

Member
I love my Maasdam for what Stihl4life said. Light duty only. I use the recommended rope to run through the Maasdam, but often attach it to a 1/4" double braid polyester cord. I run the cord well above the cut when I'm topping a tree or pulling a 20 ft tall stem back away from a slight lean. The cord should break before anything else. When the attachment point is well above the cut, the mechanical advantage is huge. 500 pounds of pull on a 20 ft lever is massive torque on the hinge. But then I'm only using it on trees that are smaller than 18".

For me the big advantage to the Maasdam is that the pull distance is equal to the length of the rope. If you're using a 5:1 MA system to pull 20 feet, you're using 100 feet of rope to make that happen. With the Maasdam, to pull 20 feet you only need 20 feet of rope.
 

pajeepman

Member
We had 1 break on the job. Tooth broke and it slipped back to the next tooth. We had 2 of them hooked up because of the size of the tree and amount of pull we needed. It all worked out in the end.
Off topic, I found them very useful for getting non running car/trucks/Jeeps onto trailers.

Sent from my SM-J727P using Tapatalk
 
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