lurking women, care to introduce yourselves?

TimBr

Well-Known Member
Thanks! I actually watched the Ddrt injury video just before looking at this post :p
I primarily climb double rope right now, but am working to use Srt for more than just ascent on large trees (where foot locking is going to burn me out before the actual job that needs to be done). I still feel really unstable going out on limbs when I srt vs ddrt. Any suggestions or pointers to make the change feel more natural are greatly appreciated, otherwise I'll just assume it is "Practice,Practice,Practice"
Hey, nicoleb! I'm probably not the best person to advise you on the limbwalk issue, but maybe @oceans can chime in with some helpful tips.

@Tom Dunlap gave a good hint regarding placement of an anchor point more directly overhead. One of the biggest advantages to climbing SRT is the ability to create a new support point just about anywhere you'd like to. Just girth hitch a sling around a branch and add a biner to it, and then clip your rope into the biner for a new support point.

I tend to climb using DSRT techniques, and this protects my relatively novice behind from taking any bone shattering swings due to having a foot slip off of a branch during a limbwalk.

Reg Coates doesn't seem to like the idea of too much dependence on climbing the rope, as I do, versus climbing the tree using fine balance and skill, as he does. I think he'd prefer to see a climber develop the fine balance possessed by the tight rope walkers. It is probably a lot faster to climb that way, if you're able to acquire the skill. I just can't afford the downside risk of busting my body up.

Also, if you aren't aware of the "rope walker" climbing system, you should look up videos of it. It requires a foot ascender and a knee ascender. I think it might be much easier than foot locking.

Tim
 
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roxy

Active Member
Hey Nicole, welcome to the Buzz and the whole wide world of tree climbing arborist geeks. Some of the forearm burn will go away as you condition more to climbing. Some could go away if you incorporate different techniques. Definitely explore single line especially for long ascents. See if Justin K is willing to do a rec climb some weekend; he can get you going from DdRt to SRT ascent only to SRWP. Have fun! Rebecca
 

GregManning

Super Moderator
Staff member
Hey Roxy ! Long time, no speak !
Just FYI . . . Nicole's current "coach" is Cormac Nagan (both at Heartwood Tree in NC).

(pretty darn good IMO !)

But more is always better !
 
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Hey everyone, I see the thread's been inactive for a while but I feel I should pipe up anyway.

I'm Mel (for Melissa), hailing from the great white North. I live and work in Winnipeg, Manitoba and am a climber/groundie/Safety and maintenance manager for my fiancé's tree business. My rope skills root from rock climbing, mountaineering and the industrial side, being a rope rescue and confined space rescue tech. So, I know a thing or two about ropes and rigging. My introduction to the tree world came in the form of my bf (fiancé now) and two of his army brothers jumping into the biz with both feet despite not knowing a whole lot about it. It's been just over a year since then and we've worked alongside winnipeg's best climbers who have said we have our s**t pretty well sorted out. So, it seems we're on the right track.

Naturally, I started out grounding for my bf and his 2 other partners but through being more available to work and just being better with ropes in general, I was eventually allowed to climb. Today, I climb about 50% of the time and the other 50% means I'm grounding for my fiancé. I've been using company gear but I recently just pulled the trigger on a MCRS and some hardware for my own lanyards which I am unbelievably stoked about.

Anyway, that's me. Hoping to bring this thread back up to life!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Welcome Mel. Bringing this thread back to life is great, glad you're here. Also, use the whole of TreeBuzz - like you own it. :)

You can use the search function to find info on so many valuable topics, some in exhaustive detail.

Congrats on getting more of your own gear. We all treat things differently and being able to control how my gear is taken care of when I hang my life on it has always been of top importance to me.

I started out working for a tree service where we went out in two person teams and both could climb. Being able to switch between climbing and ground work seems like the best of both worlds to me.
 
Hey, nicoleb! I'm probably not the best person to advise you on the limbwalk issue, but maybe @oceans can chime in with some helpful tips.

@Tom Dunlap gave a good hint regarding placement of an anchor point more directly overhead. One of the biggest advantages to climbing SRT is the ability to create a new support point just about anywhere you'd like to. Just girth hitch a sling around a branch and add a biner to it, and then clip your rope into the biner for a new support point.

I tend to climb using DSRT techniques, and this protects my relatively novice behind from taking any bone shattering swings due to having a foot slip off of a branch during a limbwalk.

Reg Coates doesn't seem to like the idea of too much dependence on climbing the rope, as I do, versus climbing the tree using fine balance and skill, as he does. I think he'd prefer to see a climber develop the fine balance possessed by the tight rope walkers. It is probably a lot faster to climb that way, if you're able to acquire the skill. I just can't afford the downside risk of busting my body up.

Also, if you aren't aware of the "rope walker" climbing system, you should look up videos of it. It requires a foot ascender and a knee ascender. I think it might be much easier than foot locking.

Tim
Thanks Tim! I went through a bit of no phone/ no computer, thank you for the tips and things to try.
Hoping ill be able to go to an srt workshop within the next year or so.
 
Hello everyone!

My name is Angela and I'm an ISA Certified Arborist. My company is Tree Health Lady. You can find me in East Texas / West Louisiana. My primary focus is tree health - injections, fertilizations, spraying, assessments, consultations, etc. We do some pruning / removal / stump grinding. But I enjoy the challenge of the diagnosis and coming up with a treatment plan. I've been in business since 2010. Glad to be a part of this group and learning more from fellow female arborists!

~Angela
www.TreeHealthLady.com
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Welcome to TreeBuzz Angela.

Just my suggestion.....if it gets a little slow waiting for other female arborists to post (notice the dates at the bottom of each post by a female) consider going to the forum section "Identify This" and its two forums that involve diagnosis.

Also if you want to see a broader cross section of any individuals online persona you can click on their screen name and view all of their previous posts in various forums here.

Again, welcome.
 
Thanks Merle! I appreciate the feedback. I'll check other threads as well.

Angela
www.TreeHealthLady.com



Welcome to TreeBuzz Angela.

Just my suggestion.....if it gets a little slow waiting for other female arborists to post (notice the dates at the bottom of each post by a female) consider going to the forum section "Identify This" and its two forums that involve diagnosis.

Also if you want to see a broader cross section of any individuals online persona you can click on their screen name and view all of their previous posts in various forums here.

Again, welcome.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Forward

Dan Carsten thought to post a link here, but, neither he nor I can copy link and get it to post.

Will someone put up WCISA's info about a great looking women's climbing skills workshop coming to Applegate CA Oct 6th - 7th?
 
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