lurking women, care to introduce yourselves?

Hi Everyone, I'm Nicole Benjamin and I just learned about TreeBuzz this weekend at the KAA TCC.
Super pumped to go through all the information on these forums... well maybe not all the posts, but ya know... the educational ones :p

I got into the tree industry in August 2015 at 31 years old because I needed a career switch to remain "sane". Sooo, I'm a little late to the game (32 years young now), but I'm hoping I'll be able to have a solid learning curve that stays vertical. I love everything about the work, the education, and the people so far.
I work out of Charlotte, NC for Heartwood Tree Service, started as a groundie, learned I absolutely love hauling trunk wood because I'm mildly insane, and in February of this past year I got to climb my first tree for work... and then storm season came and I had to wait several months to get more work climbs in... and now for the past 4 weeks I've gotten to climb about 3-4 days/week. I'm LOVING IT!
Stumbled my way through my first competition this past weekend and, though I wish I would have done a little better, I'm really happy I tried it. Definitely hooked... and Boel Hammerstrand was there and she was so incredible and inspiring to watch all day.

I truly can't wait to continue learning and getting feedback on everything. I currently climb Double Rope... but started dabbling in SRT for ascent on larger trees to try to conserve energy to actually work once I get up there. Primarily my forearms feel like the burn out. Anyone have any tips on how to strengthen them, or does it just come with time and climbing more?
 

GregManning

Super Moderator
Staff member
Hi again Nicole !

Your climb at the KY TCC Work Climb was sensational for your limited experience ! ! !
I REALLY mean it !
You were super smooth, confident posture, very good technique, safe, etc.

I thought about sending you an e-mail, but didn't have the address.

I think you could be a VERY high level competitor !
Plus, I can not think of a better coach than the one you have.
He was very complimentary of you in discussions at the after party.
Suck up everything that man tells you ! He is truly World Class ! (Climber & person)
 
Hi again Nicole !

Your climb at the KY TCC Work Climb was sensational for your limited experience ! ! !
I REALLY mean it !
You were super smooth, confident posture, very good technique, safe, etc.

I thought about sending you an e-mail, but didn't have the address.

I think you could be a VERY high level competitor !
Plus, I can not think of a better coach than the one you have.
He was very complimentary of you in discussions at the after party.
Suck up everything that man tells you ! He is truly World Class ! (Climber & person)
Thanks Greg! I'm definitely trying to sponge up and then apply ALL the knowledge :D I know I probably had my standards for what I expected to do at KY a little too high. ... Totally should have bailed on the toss and done the limb walk on the work climb... I love limb walks. But zero DQs on the day, so I'm pretty happy with that.
 

GregManning

Super Moderator
Staff member
That Limb Walk was especially time consuming. Maybe not a good exchange.

Instead, at 60 sec to go, bail to the Landing Station, Don Ovens did that ......... brilliant decision .........

1. Landing is the easiest station in the Tree ! ! !
2. Call Stand Clear
3. Ring the Bell w/ your hand
4. Land on your feet
5. Get some target bonus points if you can
6. Unclip

Don Ovens got 6 "free" points ! ! !

You don't get time points, because you didn't complete all the stations, but 6 pts is gold !

Tell Scotty Hello.
Another very good man !
 
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Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Welcome to TreeBuzz Nicole, I enjoyed your first post a lot. I appreciate people who are passionate about something in life - all the more when it's climbing.

I'm a male and so perhaps not what I would ideally like to see this thread and this part of the forum most populated with.

I just wanted to say that until there are so many women posting here that you barely have time to search elsewhere please don't hesitate to post and participate out on other parts of TreeBuzz. I have noticed that the focus stays on climbing skills, tools, or whatever and gender is a non issue.

When I first found Treebuzz I would type in various wordings of information I was interested in at the time and get access to so much in old archives. It's like being able to search hundreds of books of targeted info.

Again, welcome.
 

TimBr

Well-Known Member
Hi Everyone, I'm Nicole Benjamin and I just learned about TreeBuzz this weekend at the KAA TCC.
Super pumped to go through all the information on these forums... well maybe not all the posts, but ya know... the educational ones :p

I got into the tree industry in August 2015 at 31 years old because I needed a career switch to remain "sane". Sooo, I'm a little late to the game (32 years young now), but I'm hoping I'll be able to have a solid learning curve that stays vertical. I love everything about the work, the education, and the people so far.
I work out of Charlotte, NC for Heartwood Tree Service, started as a groundie, learned I absolutely love hauling trunk wood because I'm mildly insane, and in February of this past year I got to climb my first tree for work... and then storm season came and I had to wait several months to get more work climbs in... and now for the past 4 weeks I've gotten to climb about 3-4 days/week. I'm LOVING IT!
Stumbled my way through my first competition this past weekend and, though I wish I would have done a little better, I'm really happy I tried it. Definitely hooked... and Boel Hammerstrand was there and she was so incredible and inspiring to watch all day.

I truly can't wait to continue learning and getting feedback on everything. I currently climb Double Rope... but started dabbling in SRT for ascent on larger trees to try to conserve energy to actually work once I get up there. Primarily my forearms feel like the burn out. Anyone have any tips on how to strengthen them, or does it just come with time and climbing more?
Hey, Nicole! Welcome to the TreeBuzz forum! You sound as though you are just made for the life of a tree worker, to me. I'm not a pro like most on this forum, just a guy who's learned to climb in order to do useful work for family and friends.

The reason for my post, beyond just welcoming you to the forum, is to tell you about a lucky accident of timing, and it is in reference to the last paragraph of your post.

One of the most well respected members of the forum, named Reg Coates, (@Reg) recently posted a video that in my opinion you absolutely must watch in its entirety. Ignore the lack of fill light on his face, and just listen to everything he has to say. He possesses a lifetime of hard earned experience.

Here's the link to the thread that he recently started.

http://www.treebuzz.com/forum/threads/ddrt-injuries.33931/

Also, you should (must, really) read this thread in its entirety, started by Reg, which says things about the Rope Wrench I've seen expressed nowhere else. His experience and intelligence allows him to perceive things and express ideas that no other climber out there ever has. Here's the link to that thread.

http://www.treebuzz.com/forum/threads/rope-wrench-without-incident.32334/

My name is Tim. Thanks for joining the TreeBuzz forum. I look forward to reading about your upcoming adventures in climbing.
 

JD3000

Well-Known Member
Dom,
I poked at you only to show that the primary point why I'm here is to learn things. I post things primarily when I need some help or am looking for other eyes and opinions. You'll also find yourself helping others and having a few laughs.
Post away friends!
 
Hey, Nicole! Welcome to the TreeBuzz forum! You sound as though you are just made for the life of a tree worker, to me. I'm not a pro like most on this forum, just a guy who's learned to climb in order to do useful work for family and friends.

The reason for my post, beyond just welcoming you to the forum, is to tell you about a lucky accident of timing, and it is in reference to the last paragraph of your post.

One of the most well respected members of the forum, named Reg Coates, (@Reg) recently posted a video that in my opinion you absolutely must watch in its entirety. Ignore the lack of fill light on his face, and just listen to everything he has to say. He possesses a lifetime of hard earned experience.

Here's the link to the thread that he recently started.

http://www.treebuzz.com/forum/threads/ddrt-injuries.33931/

Also, you should (must, really) read this thread in its entirety, started by Reg, which says things about the Rope Wrench I've seen expressed nowhere else. His experience and intelligence allows him to perceive things and express ideas that no other climber out there ever has. Here's the link to that thread.

http://www.treebuzz.com/forum/threads/rope-wrench-without-incident.32334/

My name is Tim. Thanks for joining the TreeBuzz forum. I look forward to reading about your upcoming adventures in climbing.

Thanks! I actually watched the Ddrt injury video just before looking at this post :p
I primarily climb double rope right now, but am working to use Srt for more than just ascent on large trees (where foot locking is going to burn me out before the actual job that needs to be done). I still feel really unstable going out on limbs when I srt vs ddrt. Any suggestions or pointers to make the change feel more natural are greatly appreciated, otherwise I'll just assume it is "Practice,Practice,Practice"
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Welcome Nicole!

You're making the DdRT/SRT transition like a lot of climbers. Ascend SRT then work DdRT. That's how I first figured a few things out when SRT in arbo work really didn't exist.

What multicender are you using?

To practice limbwalking find a time when your TIP is located vertically above you with a more plumb angle. It will feel the most comfortable. Little by little you can flatten the angle of you rope

Another practice scenario is to 'shadow climb'. Set your TIP and use the shadows of limbs on the ground to walk. No worries about falling off!
 
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