Local Hacks Smash a Garage (video)

#5
Yeah I saw their site looked really weak....Wondering if new beginnings is a reference to a 12 step program...if so I think he needs a new sponsor, plenty of tree workers in recovery.

I am not a tree guy but was wondering, wouldn't a crane service usually tell the guy that is rigged all wrong? I can see as to how they would not want to otherwise the next question might be how should it be rigged...on the other hand not saying anything when a catastrophe is sure to follow is also not a good option.
 

ROYCE

Well-Known Member
#8
Yeah I saw their site looked really weak....Wondering if new beginnings is a reference to a 12 step program...if so I think he needs a new sponsor, plenty of tree workers in recovery.

I am not a tree guy but was wondering, wouldn't a crane service usually tell the guy that is rigged all wrong? I can see as to how they would not want to otherwise the next question might be how should it be rigged...on the other hand not saying anything when a catastrophe is sure to follow is also not a good option.
90% of the cranes that we use in tree work from rental companies have limited amount of experience with trees. What was helpful in this event was the crane was large and the weakest link in the system (other than the brains of all involved) was the slings.
I would also add that the slings were slung in that location because that was heigh as he could reach out of the bucket. He probably did not want to take the time to saddle up and sling it higher up.
To answer your question on how it should have been slung. If you notice their is only one sling used on this piece. I think he should of slung the leader another 15 or 20 feet higher and used three slings on the top section...where it forks out to balance the weight on the top. Then, we could of proceeded down and made his cut....it would have been balanced and had no shock loading. This is also much easier for the crane operator to control when it comes off clean and balanced.
 

oldoakman

Well-Known Member
#9
At least they flipped it so that the light part of the canopy hit the garage instead of the heavy butt section. If the butt would have hit the garage it would really be smashed bad.:loco:
 

allmark

Well-Known Member
#10
What else can we learn from this? It is hard to tell what type of sling they are using. If it was a rope was it tied improperly? If it was a webbing sling the rotation of the load caused the sling to move where it was choked creating tremendous heat which caused the eye to brake as it was burned through. It would be nice to know what type of sling was used and the condition of it before the pick was made. I have seen synthetic slings melted together at the eye from overloading.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
#11
90% of the cranes that we use in tree work from rental companies have limited amount of experience with trees. What was helpful in this event was the crane was large and the weakest link in the system (other than the brains of all involved) was the slings.
I would also add that the slings were slung in that location because that was heigh as he could reach out of the bucket. He probably did not want to take the time to saddle up and sling it higher up.
To answer your question on how it should have been slung. If you notice their is only one sling used on this piece. I think he should of slung the leader another 15 or 20 feet higher and used three slings on the top section...where it forks out to balance the weight on the top. Then, we could of proceeded down and made his cut....it would have been balanced and had no shock loading. This is also much easier for the crane operator to control when it comes off clean and balanced.
Great post Royce. On top of ignorance, I would be willing to bet that laziness, and or fear also had a large role in this shit show!
 
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tc262

Well-Known Member
#12
What else can we learn from this? It is hard to tell what type of sling they are using. If it was a rope was it tied improperly? If it was a webbing sling the rotation of the load caused the sling to move where it was choked creating tremendous heat which caused the eye to brake as it was burned through. It would be nice to know what type of sling was used and the condition of it before the pick was made. I have seen synthetic slings melted together at the eye from overloading.
From what I can gather it was just an eye to eye webbing sling. Hard to get any details. Other than my sister in law sending me the Facebook post I haven't heard about it even tho it was just the next town over.
 
#14
I am not a tree guy but was wondering, wouldn't a crane service usually tell the guy that is rigged all wrong?
This may happen, but I wouldn't doubt there was no line of sight on the rigging at all.
90% of the cranes that we use in tree work from rental companies have limited amount of experience with trees.
True, but most guys running a crane this size have done a lift or two and have seen what happens when a load is not balanced. Also they have seen multiple rigging points used to keep things balanced as you were saying. I really question what he could see, I think he was trusting them, that could have went very bad this was a good outcome from what we see here.
 
#15
I'll bet that guy in the buckets asshole is still puckered.

Crane operators too! That boom sprung up hard. I'm thinking the outcome may have been really bad for the dude in the bucket if it did hold on. Maybe that break saved his ass. How did not one person of that crew see that one coming and say hold up this is gonna be bad maybe we should go about this different? I was like ohh man before it even started playing.
 
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