Limits of safe lifting?

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
Ten years ago I lifted the heaviest log I could to save time, less cuts, less carries. Today, I shoot for the heaviest thing I can lift comfortably, but I have no idea what these logs actually weigh. Probably between 100 and 130. I have also been strength training to build up and maintain myself. I eat as much as I can, strict diet of healthy food, high protien. I'm 38, I have noticed that I don't heal as fast and I injure more quickly than when I was 28. Dead lifts and squats, when done with good form and not pushed to extreme seem to be helping. I am up to 6 reps at 315lbs with barbell deadlifts. I don't try for 1 rep max. It is definitely strengthening my back and core. Good form with log lifting is super important. Too many guys seem to not know how to bend their knees.
 

tomstrees

Active Member
I was able to lift three 80# cement bags together this morning without much trouble, probably could do four. Few of us ever measure the weight of logs we lift.
 

treebilly

Well-Known Member
Well our mechanic has his lifting capacity up to 7500lbs now
8D2D9244-20D2-4436-B971-11B9FBF51D9A.jpegFirst crane in the company. Just comes up a bit short for what I need though
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
At 51 I cut logs and watch younger men lift them. 2 person lifts. Nothing to prove. I am a very very fit man. I prefer flexibility and agility always have and I like a more lean physique.
Poor access for wheels?

A modified hand-truck is such a cheap and easy to use tool that is sooo versatile. Mind you, slightly modified. A basic hand-truck is a basic tool.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
Really wanted to get this on with one hand... Full disclosure, two hands to load (lifting with the big lever built into the hand- truck, not my back). At least two fingers to roll on grass. One finger in flat pavement.
Team-lifts when needed, but my friend got a broken back when the f-ing new guy pulled the load on top of them.

Keep it a one-person and tool job as possible, IMO.

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Balanced out the blade, 'horns' help lift it on, and keep it on. Little horns up top are helpful.


Toss a little square of plywood on the blade/ horns, and you have a nice loadable platform.
Rubbermaid Brute cans ride nicely.
 

KevinS

Well-Known Member
I used to handle 80 to 100 lbs OK when I was rather younger, but now in my sixties I have had to back off to a max of around 40 to 50, and also have to be a lot more careful of exact position as I lift. Lower back is much weaker and more sensitive now. This Golden Years rubbish is not all it is promoted as!
Cycles to failure applies to your body to. Sure you moved a couple 80 lbs bags but do that for 10 hours and you may find your night will suck.
Work as hard as you have to while you work as smart as you can is what I try. If you watch the old boys that get the job done with their lower impact methods and apply that wisdom to your younger body there’s a little more of you left to do some living later.
Work to live not live to work make sure you do what you can so you can play with your grandkids in 50 years
 

KevinS

Well-Known Member
Really wanted to get this on with one hand... Full disclosure, two hands to load (lifting with the big lever built into the hand- truck, not my back). At least two fingers to roll on grass. One finger in flat pavement.
Team-lifts when needed, but my friend got a broken back when the f-ing new guy pulled the load on top of them.

Keep it a one-person and tool job as possible, IMO.

View attachment 54671

View attachment 54673

View attachment 54672

Balanced out the blade, 'horns' help lift it on, and keep it on. Little horns up top are helpful.


Toss a little square of plywood on the blade/ horns, and you have a nice loadable platform.
Rubbermaid Brute cans ride nicely.
Those carts with no flat tires are light, cheap, easy and don’t really take up space in the chip box I’ve been a fan for years
 

tomstrees

Active Member
Cycles to failure applies to your body to. Sure you moved a couple 80 lbs bags but do that for 10 hours and you may find your night will suck.
Work as hard as you have to while you work as smart as you can is what I try. If you watch the old boys that get the job done with their lower impact methods and apply that wisdom to your younger body there’s a little more of you left to do some living later.
Work to live not live to work make sure you do what you can so you can play with your grandkids in 50 years
I agree; it is fine to occasionally measure what you are lifting, but in the long run you need to follow the best methods that science and health have been talking about.
 

christreez

Active Member
Really wanted to get this on with one hand... Full disclosure, two hands to load (lifting with the big lever built into the hand- truck, not my back). At least two fingers to roll on grass. One finger in flat pavement.
Team-lifts when needed, but my friend got a broken back when the f-ing new guy pulled the load on top of them.

Keep it a one-person and tool job as possible, IMO.

View attachment 54671

View attachment 54673

View attachment 54672

Balanced out the blade, 'horns' help lift it on, and keep it on. Little horns up top are helpful.


Toss a little square of plywood on the blade/ horns, and you have a nice loadable platform.
Rubbermaid Brute cans ride nicely.
I'll raise you a few thousand pounds this bad boy came in at 2500. This log may have been the demise of the bearings in this set of wheels tho...


Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
Hella load.

Guessing it want loaded using one-half-manpower (0.05 hp, I think) off the ground.


Winching a load is great, too, if you are going uphill. A rope-brake for downhill.
 
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