Lanyard Assisted SAKA Rope Walker for TIP (Tie-in-point) Back-up.

yoyoman

Well-Known Member
#1
Lanyard Assisted SAKA Rope Walker for TIP (Tie-in-point) Back-up.
Equipment used:
Onyx climbing harness by New Tribe with adjustable rope bridge.
Foot ascender (My own version soon available from Climbing Innovations
SAKA Self Advancing Knee Ascender for hands free ascents by ClimbingInnovations, LLC.
www.ClimbingInnovations.com
Petzl Secur tending neck tether for advancing the multiscender, in this case the Akimbo.
I put my foot ascender on first, take a step or two with a little foot wiggle, check my gear and attach the SAKA to the rope. Neve is there a need to attach a weight or hold the ascent line.
One option is to take your spikes with you and put them on when you reach the TIP.
Another advantage it that you can removes limbs on the way up without having to lanyard in every time.
Brought to you by www.ClimbingInnovations.com

 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
#7
I love rope walking up the trunk! I agree it's much easier than spikes. Usually I won't use my lanyard unless I'm being pulled away by the climb line, but using it as a back up is stay-alive-smart.
 
#8
I have used this technique a few times since I watched the video by Richard, and it works great. Today, I used it on a cat rescue because of a sketchy tie-in, and it caught me when my tie-in broke. I dropped a foot or two before the trunk lanyard caught, and my main rope caught on another limb. The tree was a skinny pine tree, with good limbs only at the very top at 50 feet. I shot my throw line over the top and thought my line had settled on a strong limb that I had been eyeballing, but it must have gotten hung up on a small limb just above it. When the small limb broke, the rope dropped to that limb. When I set my rope I knew that I did not have a clear look at the tie-in, which is why I put the extra lanyard on the trunk.

Anyway, here is the video -- the break occurs at 24 seconds in. I am definitely going to keep using this!

 

evo

Well-Known Member
#9
I have used this technique a few times since I watched the video by Richard, and it works great. Today, I used it on a cat rescue because of a sketchy tie-in, and it caught me when my tie-in broke. I dropped a foot or two before the trunk lanyard caught, and my main rope caught on another limb. The tree was a skinny pine tree, with good limbs only at the very top at 50 feet. I shot my throw line over the top and thought my line had settled on a strong limb that I had been eyeballing, but it must have gotten hung up on a small limb just above it. When the small limb broke, the rope dropped to that limb. When I set my rope I knew that I did not have a clear look at the tie-in, which is why I put the extra lanyard on the trunk.

Anyway, here is the video -- the break occurs at 24 seconds in. I am definitely going to keep using this!

lucky you didn't get a stub in the neck, or any where else..
 
#11
lucky you didn't get a stub in the neck, or any where else..
Very true....I was fortunate. I did get a skinned up knuckle, that was it. I should have load tested my TIP better (I like the static technique that Richard posted a while back) and should have been pruning those stubs on the way up. I will do better next time, I try not to make the same mistake twice.
 
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