Lanyard adjuster

colb

Well-Known Member
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Actually a great way to get to know your Akimbo... my adjuster broke, so the akimbo was next man up today, on a 40" oak removal. It was amazing. I tried a rec accent/decent yesterday and needed more time to dial it in, but it was instant vida on the lanyard. My rope bridge pushed on the top at one point, which was fine in this case but could have been awkward...
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
I was ready to retire whatever I owned if you named it. I won’t talk about the broken cable on my microcender ;)
 

colb

Well-Known Member
I was ready to retire whatever I owned if you named it. I won’t talk about the broken cable on my microcender ;)
Yeah, so many of these devices (including my new adjuster...) depend on a slight spring action to function. With the micrograb, it slid all the way up the lanyard when I had both ends clipped to my right d. I was trailing 10 feet of lanyard everywhere I went and needed two hands to lengthen it when I got to my tie-in point... Then, I had to keep tension on it after I set it. Can you imagine working a 40" oak down, dealing with that all day? At one point I had to limb walk a low limb out 40 feet in some crape myrtles with my line about 30° below horizon, cut off some 3-5" diameter fluff, cut and drop 10 small chunks, then winch 15' of 9-14" diameter log up out of the crape myrtles. I almost got blown off by a 15mph breeze, lol. Adjusting that micrograb would have been a pain in the as*. If you look close, you can see a smudge of blue in this pic, from the end of the day.
58960
After using the Akimbo yesterday I'll have a tough time switching to something else... It spoiled me, possibly forever. Thanks Jaime - I know it's not what you intended, but it sure is slick. And, not my idea, originally, so everyone can blame @Mark Chisholm. :paloma:

@JMerritt
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
Lanyard yes. MRS yes, but not as well without a hitch tending pulley. SRS is probably pushing the envelop a bit, but I bet it runs pretty well with a Rope Wrench. Depending on the climber-hitch cord-climbing rope variables, I may be overly optimistic, but for some it may even perform like a simplified Hitch Hiker, at a fraction of the cost.
[/QUOTE]

Your last sentence describes how it works for me, on SRT. With long enough eye legs, it can be adjusted to be so loose that it won’t grab anymore. Or with the ring moved up next to the wraps, hard to move. As the picture shows, to adjust, first push down on the wraps and take slack out by pulling on the twist. For less tension, hold the wrap and pull down on the ring. For more tension, hold the ring and pull on the eyes.
It also acts like the HH on SRT, if it is added to the bottom of another friction hitch, like the 6 wrap Prusik below.
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When used with the Rope Wrench, it is easier to push the hitch down for that short distance it takes the Wrench to rotate and engage the rope.

On top of the HH, the hitch only made it slightly easier to descend, not much difference.
 

climbstihl

Active Member
I find the sticht hitch to work very well for me with my combination to descend SRT, it does tend to bind up sometimes when tending though.
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
I find the sticht hitch to work very well for me with my combination to descend SRT, it does tend to bind up sometimes when tending though.
When I push the legs with the plastic coated sewn eyes into the ring, it loosens nicely. I don't yet know how to splice eyes onto prusiks and I don't think I have an eye-&-eye long enough for a six wrap stitch hitch to try in place of a Hitch Hiker, but I'm curious to test it on SRT, using a self-anchored lanyard. For a Lanyard adjuster using an 8mm prusik cord, it's the nutz with regard to rope grabs, but tending or adding slack when the line is weighted isn't so smooth.
 
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climbstihl

Active Member
When I push the legs with the plastic coated sewn eyes into the ring, it loosens nicely. I don't yet know how to splice eyes onto prusiks and I don't think I have an eye-&-eye long enough for a six wrap stitch hitch to try in place of a Hitch Hiker, but I'm curious to test it on SRT, using a self-anchored lanyard. For a Lanyard adjuster using an 8mm prusik cord, it's the nutz with regard to rope grabs, but tending or adding slack when the line is weighted isn't so smooth.
I mainly use tied 10mm, so I can't pusk the eyes in the ring. I'm using a 4 wrap most of the time. This also doesn't work with my sewn e2e, because the eyes finish flush with the hitchclimber, which I always use with the sticht hitch.
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Yeah, so many of these devices (including my new adjuster...) depend on a slight spring action to function. With the micrograb, it slid all the way up the lanyard when I had both ends clipped to my right d. I was trailing 10 feet of lanyard everywhere I went and needed two hands to lengthen it when I got to my tie-in point... Then, I had to keep tension on it after I set it. Can you imagine working a 40" oak down, dealing with that all day? At one point I had to limb walk a low limb out 40 feet in some crape myrtles with my line about 30° below horizon, cut off some 3-5" diameter fluff, cut and drop 10 small chunks, then winch 15' of 9-14" diameter log up out of the crape myrtles. I almost got blown off by a 15mph breeze, lol. Adjusting that micrograb would have been a pain in the as*. If you look close, you can see a smudge of blue in this pic, from the end of the day.
View attachment 58960
After using the Akimbo yesterday I'll have a tough time switching to something else... It spoiled me, possibly forever. Thanks Jaime - I know it's not what you intended, but it sure is slick. And, not my idea, originally, so everyone can blame @Mark Chisholm. :paloma:

@JMerritt
Sorry for that :loco:
 

WaitakKauri

Well-Known Member
For rec climbing, I use up to three lanyards, sizes, 15', 30' & 55', depending on the tree and my climbing objectives. The 15' & 30' lanyards are used primarily in a MRS lanyard configuration connecting to my saddle's side Ds. The 55' and sometimes the 30' lanyard is used mainly as a secondary climbing system attached to my rope bridge's swivel, usually with a throwing hook or a self-mounted anchor point, so for that, I use the MadRock Safeguard, similar to the Petzl GriGri. Both the Safeguard and GriGri are mid-line attachable, so either one works well in an SRS or MRS lanyard configuration and a RAD setup. For my shorter primary lanyard, I use the Petzl Micrograb, which works great too for a side-Ds lanyard using a doubled rope configuration. I acknowledge the warnings about the fact that the Safeguard and GriGri can slip when unweighted, but that's just something I am mindful of and it's not a deal breaker. I'm also mindful about using my breaking hand, when adjusting the Safeguard or GriGri.
Slight off topic. @John@TreeXP , are you regularly carrying 2 of those large lanyards? I'm asking as that's some heavy load. I (rec climber too) have some similar lenghts, but wouldn't carry all three, probably only the 15 and my 45 (10mm with hook). Mind I, normally climb srt so my tail becomes ddrt, or for conifers it's ddrt on ascent. Just curious
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
Slight off topic. @John@TreeXP , are you regularly carrying 2 of those large lanyards? I'm asking as that's some heavy load. I (rec climber too) have some similar lenghts, but wouldn't carry all three, probably only the 15 and my 45 (10mm with hook). Mind I, normally climb srt so my tail becomes ddrt, or for conifers it's ddrt on ascent. Just curious
I prefer to pack light so I only ascend with the short 15' on my harness. I either pull my other 30' or 55' lanyard to my canopy tie in point, from the ground. That way, I can set it up with all the necessary hardware and have it ready to use, as soon as I reach the height when I'll want to use it.
 
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