Job specific first aid kit, and AR list

#1
I'm working on putting together more robust kits for our trucks. The issue I have with many off the shelf kits is that they can't handle a likely scenario for us.

My list of additions:
- SAM splint
- Israeli trauma compression bandage
- antihistamine in packets not bottle
- medical tape 1"
- laminated kit list, with emergency response protocol on back.i.e. scene size up, 911, AR flowchart, etc
- write in rain pad for accident notes

What else do you all recommend? I would like to compile a list.

Added later with edit:

- asprin - heart attack
- self adhesive bandages
- eye wash kit
- all weather pen
- headlamp
- bandage sheers
- c spine collar
- bandage sheers
- triangle bandages
- electrolyte drink mix
- CAT tourniquet
- vetwrap self adhesive wrap bandage
- tweezers - see Uncle Bill's
- celox - blood stopping powder
- beesuit
- aerosol insect poison
 
Last edited:
#3
Thank you. I'm going to go over that.

I'm pretty sure the basic kits we bought meet that, however I feel like there are some items that should be added considering we deal with a relatively high likelihood of severe lacerations, and crush injuries from swinging objects or falling.
 
#7
I'm also adding
- asprin - heart attack
- self adhesive bandages
- eye wash kit
- all weather pen
- headlamp
- bandage sheers
- c spine collar
- bandage sheers
- triangle bandages
- electrolyte drink mix
 

Limb It

Well-Known Member
#8
Every first aid kit should contain Vet Wrap. Its a self adhesive tensor bandage that is great for a multitude of things aside from just aplying pressure to a joint. Any time I need to apply a bandage to a limb, i use it. Keeps gauze in place much better than tape, and doesnt hurt when it comes to removal. It isnt effected by sweat or moisture either.
 
#12
Every first aid kit should contain Vet Wrap. Its a self adhesive tensor bandage that is great for a multitude of things aside from just aplying pressure to a joint. Any time I need to apply a bandage to a limb, i use it. Keeps gauze in place much better than tape, and doesnt hurt when it comes to removal. It isnt effected by sweat or moisture either.
That's more or less what I meant by "self adhesive bandages" but I can see how that doesn't distinguish from a bandaid type bandage. It was meant to mean a self adhesive elastic wrap type of bandage.

A friend had said coban (there are off brand substitutes), would you recommend vetwrap ( or off brand) over that? Possibly more rugged since it's marketed towards horses?
 

Limb It

Well-Known Member
#13
I have always had vetwrap in the house for my horses, so thats what i bring with me. I know that i have never had it come lose or fall off. Plus, you can get it in hot pink. The threat of me patching my groundies up with hot pink bandages keeps them from hurting themselves.
 
#16
Who in your crew knows how, when, or why to apply a c-collar?

I dont do tree work. That being said, Tourniquets would be #1 on my list. But does your crew know how to use them?

Do they know basic CPR?

If you're going to stock an antihistamine for minor seasonal and environmental allergies, I'd go for something like claritin. Benadryl can be sedating for some. Not I'd want that when fatigue and chainsaws are already a possibility.

SAM splints are great.

With anything you put in the kit...Make sure it's something people know how/when/when not to use, otherwise you're wasting time and money and potentially making things worse.

Emergency contact info, medical history, medications prescribed, and allergies are useful pieces of information for first responders if the patient is not responding. Not everyone would want all that info going to their employer so not sure how that would be handled.

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#17
Who in your crew knows how, when, or why to apply a c-collar?

I dont do tree work. That being said, Tourniquets would be #1 on my list. But does your crew know how to use them?

Do they know basic CPR?

If you're going to stock an antihistamine for minor seasonal and environmental allergies, I'd go for something like claritin. Benadryl can be sedating for some. Not I'd want that when fatigue and chainsaws are already a possibility.

SAM splints are great.

With anything you put in the kit...Make sure it's something people know how/when/when not to use, otherwise you're wasting time and money and potentially making things worse.

Emergency contact info, medical history, medications prescribed, and allergies are useful pieces of information for first responders if the patient is not responding. Not everyone would want all that info going to their employer so not sure how that would be handled.

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I want to do an intake form with new employees allowing them to disclose medical information at their discretion. This would be printed and kept in binders in the trucks, updated annually at minimum.

Currently I am the only one on my crew who has practiced/been trained in using a c spine collar. We were taught to use them as well as using backboard harness at a 2 day advanced AR class we attended.

The rest of our crew will attend that class when it comes around in summer again.

You do have a good point about training for the tools. That's something we will incorporate. I would like to send the team through WFR certification. Currently all of our full time crew is CPR/FA certified.
 
#18
I have a generic antihistamine in my Amazon cart right now selected only on it containing the main active ingredient listed on benedryl "diphenhydramine". Is there some reason you would recommend clariton over a generic?
 
#19
It looks like claritin contains "loratadine". Does anyone know if that is effective at preventing the body from accepting venom from bees as I understand benedryl as I assume "diphenhydramine" is?

It was explained to to that while Benadryl doesn't counteract the effects of bee venom, it does stop further absorbtion? of the venom. Does that sound correct?
 

Magnum783

Well-Known Member
#20
Vet wrap, Coban same thing vet wrap is cheap as it is "not for human use". Conban is "for human use" both come out of the same plant and are the same thing. Just FYI.

A thought Evan the collage here provides first aid cpr for $80/hd or you can purchase the whole class (20 seats) for $400. Just a thought I often forget to make use of the local community collage.
 
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