Info on sea kelp microinjection?

MATT_MAYO

New Member
Has anyone micro/macro injected trees with concentrated sea kelp. What concentrations are you using and what results are you seeing?
 

TProsser

New Member
I killed a tree doing that about 25 years ago.
A burr oak - not very healthy - but it fried it.
I didn't use that much. I was doing one of my crazy experiments.
I'm not sure what benefit it could possibly provide.
 

Chum

New Member
The idea is to supplement the soil/root rhizosphere, where the action takes place...not bypassing this important reality.
 

MATT_MAYO

New Member
This is one of my crazy experiments. We add Sea Kelp to the soil along with humic acid and a variety of other products. What do you do when the tree is not responding? What do you do when the root system is compromised? Why have companies created specific nutrient injectables? This seems like such unexplored territory, guess I'll be happy to do the research. Thanks!
 

Chum

New Member
Applications here need defining - are you considering literal injections into the vascular system...or root zone/feeding?
 

Chum

New Member
There's quite a bit of physiology doing it's thing between when moisture and elements enter the roots then transport up the vascular cells. The second problem I see is an induced tylosis response to vascular loading, and even one more problem could be blockage of the vascular cells by compound viscosity.

This isn't to say I haven't tried forced feeding - have had success when combining a wetting agent to certain free elements like iron and zinc.

When injecting in the old days, we could stimulate uptake be spraying a saline mix (Bicarb of soda) on the canopy, dissicating moisture from the leaevs and forcing a sponge-like translocation of the treatments. Kelp however, has not only necessary DNA/RNA stimulant factors (which is probably what effect you're zeroing in on), but it's also loaded with high nitrogen levels and several agents that work like coagulators.

Perhaps if you adjust the pH to match the sapwood (less phytotoxicity), centrifuge the solution to separate solids, and reduce liquid tension by adding a adjuvant...it might pass-on some interesting benefits.
 

MATT_MAYO

New Member
The current liquid kelp that we are using is extremely filtered, not like the gooey mixtures of the old days that would clog a filter every few hours. I'm not sure what the PH is but that would be pretty easy to find out. What woul be added as an adjuvant. I am not sure exactly what will happen but I will be sure to let you know.
 

MATT_MAYO

New Member
Why do you think that kelp that kelp would need an adjuvent? I am planning on using concentrated kelp on a cottonwood tree on my property(which eventually will be removed) Then diluting using water only. I also would like to see what would happen using products like superthrive in conjunction or on there own. Could anyone recommend a good biology guide to study.
 
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