Important landscape tree

treebear

Member
We were sent out to fell this old pollarded elm because it was too near a 22kV line. The old tree grows about 500mtrs above sea level and have been pollarded by the local farmer for generations. The branches have been used to feed his sheep during the winter. We felt bad about felling this old beutiful tree. After an inspection we found no evidence of rot and decided to pollard it instead of felling. It grew so far from the conductors that it would not be a problem of growing to near within a normal cycle. We hope this is ok with the utility giving us the job.
How are your procedures in such a case?
Svein
www.hogstogrydding.no
 

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Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Good for you! That tree has energy in it from the care over the generations. You made a connection to that energy.

The world is a better place now. Keeping old trees alive is important.

It seems like you have the discretion to make prune/remove decision without input from the utility. Is that so?
 

treebear

Member
For this particular utility we very much decide what to fell and what to leave, within the rules that is. For 22kV the distance between vegetation and conductor must never be closer than 3mtrs.
Svein
www.hogstogrydding.no
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
The power co. here used to say 6'-8' for that voltage. Now they want 10'. It is a new company to the area. They have given us the authority to decide what clearance needs to be given depending upon species. That is the greatest power (in the right hands) to give. Now we are leaving dogwoods, cedars, hollies...that are 20' tall under 230KV lines instead of blindly clear-cutting. /forum/images/graemlins/cool.gif It feels good to make a difference.

Some trees and areas will never be treated right , but this will help a bit.
 

jerseywild

Member
A little help here guys.
I thought when you pollard cut a tree you could only cut back that years growth, the pictures I remember seeing the ends of the branches looked like balls because you never cut into them just the new growth. I hate to say it but that tree looks like heck! It looks topped and chopped from the pic.
A little direction here would be greatly appreciated.

By the way those cars were parked on the wrong side of the street.
/forum/images/graemlins/ahhhhh.gif
 

treebear

Member
Ooops! big mistake. The first picture is from low voltage clearance in Bergen city where we had to take down some branches over a parked car. This is the right before picture. We cut back the new growth to the base but the new growth was 9 years old. If we prune the tree at cycles of four growh seasons it will stay outside the tree mtr border. The tree might look like heck as a tree but it is to be looked at as a memory of a way to farm that no longer exists. Actually farmers in Norway who has such old trees on their land are government funded to keep on pollarding the trees like in the past.
Svein
www.hogstogrydding.no
 

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rborist1

New Member
Thay last pic looks like the winter wonderland we were just working in.........Next week I am off to the far north where there is 3ft of snow on the ground still.
 

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BUK

Member
Who gets to shake the snow off that tree before you cut it /forum/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 
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