I Figured Out My Uneasiness Climbing

Birdyman88

Well-Known Member
Okay, I don't want to overplay any climbing fear here. To the casual observer, and even to my groundie, I probably look perfectly at ease and have no issues accessing even difficult parts of the tree. I may not be the fastest climber out there, but I also try to measure myself against a higher standard. Nonetheless, I still have moments in the tree when I slow down considerably and operate at a slower pace to which I am more comfortable. I always thought it was just my experience level, and that things would get faster with time, but I am now totally convinced my discomfort is actually attributable to something else - my peripheral vision, or lack thereof.

I've been at height since I was 7, whether it was sitting in deer stands, climbing ladders in the family painting business, putting on roofs with my brother, doing tree work with my bro-in-law, or jumping off cliffs at the local river. No fears, no worries, no accidents.

Yesterday, I was cleaning the roof of my rental property getting it ready to list. It is not a steep roof, heck I'm the one who put it on in 2004 - solo - but I felt uncomfortable yesterday. Much the same sensation I get in the tree sometimes. I was constantly looking to make sure I didn't step off the edge, and thinking to myself " geez, you're a tree climber, get over it". I had no feel for the boundaries. This was definitely something new for me. That's when I realized what it was. It's no mystery that my sight is not what it used to be, but I never considered my periphery to be an issue.

Well, at least I know what it is now, so maybe I can figure out a way to adapt. I have the blood pressure of a 25 year old, but damn, sometimes being 53 sucks.
 
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Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Good for you. Our body usually does know best - and at the least is worth taking very seriously.

Now I bet there is a solution out there for you, lenses that expand PV, an operation, or something. At the very least just having a good reason can make it comfortable to go along at a safe speed.

Good job, thanks for sharing.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Bravery is not the absence of fear but the mastery of it..


One thing I’ve noticed for my self is I’m shit after lunch. Shaky leg less likely to go out to the tips, to climb as high, the bendy tip tripping me out more etc... something worse with a semi full belly, a quick snack about 1/4, 1/2. 3/4 is much better than a actual lunch break. Still don’t get it but I know the cure?!
 

Birdyman88

Well-Known Member
The problem I run into is movement backwards/sideways while I mind my foot position which is on the opposite side of my body from the direction I'm moving, such as with a lean when heading out a limb. I know we all deal with this, but I literally have to watch my feet into position, then turn my eyes to find another foothold or limb to grab. I've always had excellent peripheral vision and spent my life doing moves like that with one eye position. I think it really boils down to the fact that I am watching my feet more than when I was younger. That pretty much syncs with the revelation on the roof.

The new reality is upon me. Maybe its time to spend some money and buy those bright red clip n step boots.
 
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Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
Before making too many new commitments, maybe try Bilberry supplements? Has quite a few antioxidants that target the eyes, and works for a lot of other eye complaints...

Maybe eating more organic carrots too?
 

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain."
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain."
Thanks Muad'dib.
 

Birdyman88

Well-Known Member
Maybe time for a visit to the eye doctor?
Yeas, it's time again. I usually go every 2-3 years. Funny, every time I go I keep expecting them to tell me I finally need glasses, but they always say everything is great, except for some age related presbyopia. Got some prescription readers, but that's it.

Before making too many new commitments, maybe try Bilberry supplements?
I think I will do that.

I'm pretty sure glaucoma can cause loss of PV.
Will it cause problems driving at night? It's not bad by any means, but I have noticed a slight change in my night vision.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Bravery is not the absence of fear but the mastery of it..


One thing I’ve noticed for my self is I’m shit after lunch. Shaky leg less likely to go out to the tips, to climb as high, the bendy tip tripping me out more etc... something worse with a semi full belly, a quick snack about 1/4, 1/2. 3/4 is much better than a actual lunch break. Still don’t get it but I know the cure?!
Food can have a profound effect on your hormones, emotions, and moods. The best way I have found to power through life is to start the day with a cup of bulletproof coffee and No Carbs for breakfast and lunch. Just tons of protein, fat, and veggies. Then at dinner you load up on everything including mountains of carbs. Keeps your endocrine system singing and works with your circadian rhythm giving you loads of energy and also creating a better quality and quanity of sleep.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
I have glacoma on my dad's side of the family and am checked each year as a result. A good eye doc appointment is very affordable and abundantly worth it. I would go to someone who when I read off my list of symptoms could tell me, "Oh, it's this or it's that. And this is what you do for it."

Then if my research showed that I could deal with it in some less invasive way while monitoring results I may well do that instead.
 

Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain."
Got any of that Spice to share around?
 

Jemco

Active Member
I get alotta blowback about my firm belief that if you are genuinely scared up there, you don't belong up there, period.

Having said that, many of my own brothers started out climbin real shaky, but overcame their fear to become proficient commercial climbers, and tree co owners.

It ain't easy to find good climbers for a number of very good reasons.

Physical ability and coordination being just one. If you can't do a pull-up, you probably shouldn't climb. If you can't do a muscle up, you probably shouldn't be on a rope rescue team.

Jemco
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
In my opinion he has clearly stated he is not afraid. He was uneasy.....and now he clearly knows why.

My car was once pulling a little to one side. I checked the steering a time or two at hwy speed. Then I pulled over and discovered a 16 penny nail in a tire sidewall. I guess I could have sold the car but instead googled the nearest tire store and had the tire replaced.

Ribbing you a bit Jemco. :)
 

Jemco

Active Member
Believe me Merle, I've been stone cold terrified aloft a few times over my long career.

Early 80's, Balboa Naval Hospital, Big euc prunes, I'm up about 85 feet prunin away, guy in the bucket prunin the next tree to mine, drops a leader that bust a giant beehive in the bottom of my tree in half!

Naturally they go after me above them, not him what done it!

So I'm gettin swarmed n stung, tryin to burn down to the ground, but the three strand coiled beneath my monkey fist, leaving me stuck just a few feet off the ground, being stung mercilessly.

Lucky for me, the owner of the outfit, along with a climber on the ground, heroically ran in and lifted me up enough to unclip and run for my life. Both heroes were stung 5-6 times themselves.

It was a pretty surreal situation as I ran shedding my gear n clothing as the bees attacked each inanimate item I shed, saddle, shirt, didn't matter, they were in full bore kill mode.

So they kept after me runnin this way n that, saw a nearby swimming pool, and dove in, having been stung over 100 times, I floated under the water looking upward, amazed to see a carpet of bees floating on the surface above me, forcing me to the shallow end to surface in un infested water to breathe.

As fate would have it, they had just chlorinated the pool.

The feeling of having snorted grams n grams of cocaine kept my heart rate pounding for hours. And after the climber that helped me pulled all the stingers out of my scalp and face n upper torso, I drove myself to a nearby ER, though I did have to pull over n puke once.

Welcome to the commercial treebiz Jonny!

Another absolutely terrifying moment occurred just across the street in Baboa Park, in a huge euc, I'd just dropped down about fifteen feet to prune the next lateral, but looking up saw that I'd missed a large piece of deadwood on the leader I'd just finished. Somewhat ticked with myself, I made a power move backup the doubled line to the leader, didn't take the slack outta my line, steeped out on the lateral, started my 020, was about to cut, when crack! The whole leader snapped off the trunk behind me, leaving me free falling face first towards the ground, with a running trimsaw in my hand, for fifteen feet before my bodyline whipped me back around towards the sky so violently it's a wonder it didn't break my back, or make me drop the saw.

So I came down real slow in sheepish like, and announced an early lunch!

It was pure fuggin terror for a long drawn out few seconds there tho!

Jemco
 
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