How to be an Excellent Climber---from the Groundie

96coal449

Well-Known Member
I hate when a groundie proceeds to tell you what HE would do if he owned climbing gear. Few years ago, when this happened before, I rocked to the ground. I then ripped my gear off and through it at him, then yelled "you think you got this go ahead.''
 

96coal449

Well-Known Member
We are still talking about being a good climber FROM the groundie's perspective?

By engaging my ground crew in the aerial component we work better as a team. They feel their input is valued and better understand where I may be coming from when I do things a specific way. Learn and grow.
My post was referencing a 3 month old green groundie. He pinched my nerve in the wrong way. End of the day and I was on the 6th or 7th removal in 90 deg humid heat. I had had enough. I usually make everything a team effort and show my guys appreciation, especially when well deserved.
 

treehumper

Well-Known Member
Hard when it's a trying day and we just want to get things finished. I just try to count to 10 or whatever gives me the chance to rethink how I handle someone like that. I may use it as a teachable moment by walking through what they think is the "right way" to do it. This gives them my perspective and where I see a shortcoming relative to my approach. Even if my approach is only better insomuch as that's the way I want to do it.

I'm the one in the tree and I've got to be comfortable with how things go.
 

TimBr

Well-Known Member
We are still talking about being a good climber FROM the groundie's perspective?

By engaging my ground crew in the aerial component we work better as a team. They feel their input is valued and better understand where I may be coming from when I do things a specific way. Learn and grow.
This is where the ability to communicate using those Sena headsets would really be invaluable. Being able to give the groundies a play-by-play as to what you're doing and why could really help them learn quickly. Just my humble opinion.

Tim
 

96coal449

Well-Known Member
This is where the ability to communicate using those Sena headsets would really be invaluable. Being able to give the groundies a play-by-play as to what you're doing and why could really help them learn quickly. Just my humble opinion.

Tim
Tim, I like those headsets. They are heaven sent when needed. In the incident I was referring to, there was no communication barrier. Neither the chipper or the saw was running. Just the groundie's mouth .... and all day at that .... :tonto:
 

Drumbo

Active Member
Sena's are beautiful.
The ground guys I normally work with have heard my what I have to say about how to run my ropes enough times that I don't have to say anything anymore, but still do.
Unfortunately I was working with some guys that have never ran my ropes before so my normal tricks were a little harder to explain to them. Which ends up with me frantically trying to dodge butts to the face.
I know my fault really oh well, we live and we learn.
Or you just get hurt I suppose.
 

JustinK

Well-Known Member
Speak up. It's always quieter in the tree than on the ground, unless you're above a building or fence that's blocking a louder noise. Don't get pissed and be a diva bitch when the groundie can't hear you.

Establish a plan on the ground and communicate it, and if the groundie is affected and the plan changes after leaving the ground, let someone know, so they can adjust what they're doing, to set up/clean up/ etc, so that every thing goes more efficiently.
 

treehumper

Well-Known Member
To further the communication concepts, always confirm with your groundperson what you're going to do, agree on the size and approach to the piece. There may be something they are able to see that you don't. It may be just to keep them engaged and feeling a part of the decision making process given that they are the ones who have to deal with whatever you're sending their way.

Acknowledge their good work! I've found it keeps them upbeat.
 
I recommend a "Stop Work Protocol" where anyone on the crew, with any type of experience, at anytime, has the authority to stop all work taking place if something doesn't look right. Key to this is not being a prick to the groundie when he stops you...one of two things will happen (maybe both):

(1) he will save your life/prevent an accident
(2) you will have an opportunity to teach him something/learn something for yourself
 
Sena makes blue tooth-headsets. They cancel noise, play music you can take calls. Beside all that you can put them in your ear defenders. I will not work without them in the trees. Why people don't use them is beyond me.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

CutHighnLetFly

Well-Known Member
Sena makes blue tooth-headsets. They cancel noise, play music you can take calls. Beside all that you can put them in your ear defenders. I will not work without them in the trees. Why people don't use them is beyond me.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Ah dude stop it I've been pushing back purchasing two sets for me and my buddy I sub with. The smallest stupid little thinks keep coming up making me holster my wallet whenever I'm about to pull the trigger on it
 
Groundies perspectives are every bit as valuable to the climber, they see the tree in its entirety, they see lean, limb weight bias, they see the new guy walking into the drop zone with his head down, they see how far the spar has to come down before we can flop it...list goes on. I'm big on getting everyone to contribute with feedback, opinions, solutions, etc. Climbers aren't fucking gods, despite what a lot of us act like. My old boss used to wait angrily 3 ft in the air for me to unhook his climbing saw before he hit the ground, then he'd drop his gear at the base of the tree, get in his truck and drive away...
 
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