How do you store your gear at-home? (textiles / not tools&equipment)

eyehearttrees

Active Member
I've got very limited space and am storing all of my climbing-gear in my room, I'd initially had everything setup revolving around a hook-system (I've got 5 hooks coming from drywall-studs right now, >half have ropes hanging-down with loops knotted-in to clip crap onto, it's just an array of stuff that I try to keep separated between climbing/rigging lol)

It's too messy, am about to go into the attic so I can hang...something! Hoping to hear what others do, if anyone's gone this route, I'm picturing dropping a couple or several lines (probably use real climb line for the look, unsure if I'll get myself to waste good line like that though :p ) through my ceiling-drywall to suspend either a 2x4" (maybe 6' long?), or a small/medium plywood panel, from the joist right-above the ceiling's drywall. I'd have this suspended just ~6" from the ceiling, I'd drill a bunch of holes in it, and would be able to have a 'vertical closet' of sorts, can have hooks on the board (or 2x4, or bamboo-shoot - thinking that may look good :) ) as well as lines hanging-down that I can consolidate metal-hardwares onto.


Would love to see pics if anyone's got a bedroom-storage setup they're liking, I initially went for just keeping it tight&tidy in a section of my closet but having it all 'tucked away' is a PITB, I need to get at things too-often that it's gotta be 'out' in a sense!

Thanks :)
 

climbstihl

Well-Known Member
This is how I have it set up at the moment, in reality only the saw, helmet and rope bag are where they belong, and most of the stuff you see clipped to the rope bag is on the saddle which ends up somewhere on the ground.
Pictures wouldn't load, I'll do it later when I have wifi.
 
Gear storage is important! I myself like to keep all gear gathered in kits. I store all gear in Rigid Tool Boxes. I have the boxes that are on wheels and on top of each box, I have the open crate type storage bin. They are also made by Rigid Tool. I keep climbing gear separate from rigging gear. It is a easy way to all kit all gear in one place. The Rigid Tool Boxes also make it easy to carry the gear to the job site and from the truck to the work station area.

This box contains all my climbing gear that I use. I have two more just like it that all the rigging gear is kept in.

I know that you asked how do others store their textiles but, like I said, I keep everything that is part of a kit together for easy and quick access. Of course my ropes are all kept in tool bags. They are just flecked into them for easy tangle free deployment.
Marks Iphone Pics 002.JPG
 
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Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
Wire shelving materials come up for free routinely on Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace. I bag or bucket my climbing ropes and shorter rigging ropes. Longer rigging ropes go into plastic suitcases. I've found all of them for free on the curb on garbage day. scavenging saves money for important purchases like________________ .
 

Bango Skank

Well-Known Member
I got 2 big USAF flight bags and my everyday stuff stays in them. One is for climbing gear and climbing ropes, one is for rigging gear and ropes. One of these bags I've been using for around 14 years. They're quite durable and can hold alot of stuff. It's easy to load them with so much stuff that they're too heavy to carry one handed.
Also have a large rope bag that holds another 3 ropes. Can never have too much rope :)
 

climbstihl

Well-Known Member
What I have found to work well for transport is an old roller duffel bag, it doesn’t work well for storage for me, because I don’t have the space for it on the floor. I can fit my rope bag, saddle with everything attached, handsaw, throwline and my saw pants in the main compartement, and I have some more room in there, plus a lot of room in the pockets for first aid etc...
You could use one bag for climbing and one for rigging gear.20190511_215752.jpg20190511_220147.jpg
 

Bob Bob

Well-Known Member
You guys sure are neat and organized.

My current climbing gear is stored in my backpack, it just kinda lives in there. After climbs I'll often sort through the gear and air it out if needed before returning it to it's home. Other gear is rotated in and out as needed. My extra hardware and software is stored in clear totes.

These gear storage shelves sure look nice. If I had the space I think I would go that route.
 

climbstihl

Well-Known Member
Nice! Not just climbing gear but an impressive knife collection, books and some guitars too! I think I see a Mora knife hanging on the upright and a homemade rope wrench peeking out.
Yep, love me some good knives, although most there are pretty cheap. Consolidated my books to the important stuff, that entire shelf was filled with them before. I actually only own the bass you see, I don't really play guitar. What you can't see here is the keyboard which I use to practice my piano and pipe organ playing..
 

Mitch Hoy

Active Member
“The mound” lives in my garage. It consists of over ten filled rope bags, totes of more rope, gear bags, toolboxes, shelves of cutting hardware, loose textiles, and a pile of climbing extrania fallen to the side of the road in my personal climbing evolution. There’s even a running 200 in there that I refuse to put to work.

It’s like my dragon’s hoard. I can’t bear to get rid of any of it. Some of it I use daily, a lot of it I probably never will again. Sometimes I go in there and dote on my precious useless stuff like a model train collector. It drives my wife insane. I’m not kidding when I say this: there is a rope that I found so “pretty” when I bought it that I avoided using it until I bought another length. The first one got its own rope bag, and on occasion I will go to “the mound” and revel in its unblemished dyes and perfect hand, just to get that “new rope” feeling again. I have a f*ing problem.

All the climbing gear I use on a regular basis is organized into smaller bags that nest in a large backpack, which includes two climbing ropes; one bagged, one on the bottom. There is also a mini rigging system in there that fits with 100’ of 3/8 line, a mini POW, and pulley/sling. It is one big, heavy bag. I used to use a duffel, but kept breaking straps. I have four other complete rigging systems, each with their own rope bag large enough to fit both the rope and the hardware/slings. I like things to be both organized and ready to go, so I have a lot of multiples for hardware that are in their own systems. Less thought, less variables, more capabilities, more redundancy.
 

Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
“The mound” lives in my garage. It consists of over ten filled rope bags, totes of more rope, gear bags, toolboxes, shelves of cutting hardware, loose textiles, and a pile of climbing extrania fallen to the side of the road in my personal climbing evolution. There’s even a running 200 in there that I refuse to put to work.

It’s like my dragon’s hoard. I can’t bear to get rid of any of it. Some of it I use daily, a lot of it I probably never will again. Sometimes I go in there and dote on my precious useless stuff like a model train collector. It drives my wife insane. I’m not kidding when I say this: there is a rope that I found so “pretty” when I bought it that I avoided using it until I bought another length. The first one got its own rope bag, and on occasion I will go to “the mound” and revel in its unblemished dyes and perfect hand, just to get that “new rope” feeling again. I have a f*ing problem.

All the climbing gear I use on a regular basis is organized into smaller bags that nest in a large backpack, which includes two climbing ropes; one bagged, one on the bottom. There is also a mini rigging system in there that fits with 100’ of 3/8 line, a mini POW, and pulley/sling. It is one big, heavy bag. I used to use a duffel, but kept breaking straps. I have four other complete rigging systems, each with their own rope bag large enough to fit both the rope and the hardware/slings. I like things to be both organized and ready to go, so I have a lot of multiples for hardware that are in their own systems. Less thought, less variables, more capabilities, more redundancy.
You don’t accidentally call your wife your ropes’ name?
 
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