High Cribbing - Best way to be stable??

rypie37

New Member
Anybody got any tips? We have loads of 6x6s that we will jenga stack to go under our wider outrigger pads, but once the stack goes up beyond 2 to 3 layers I've been quite concerned with stability. For our rear stabilizer we have another jenga stack that goes even higher too. Last time I tried it, using all of our Cribbing essentially just slightly jerking the boom made the whole crane rock, so I canceled the job.

This was with Cribbing on asphalt, having done my damdest to get the outriggers centered over the jenga towers.

Anybody have good practices to reference, or outrigger pads? We're in the market for new ones anyway.
 

deevo

Well-Known Member
Anybody got any tips? We have loads of 6x6s that we will jenga stack to go under our wider outrigger pads, but once the stack goes up beyond 2 to 3 layers I've been quite concerned with stability. For our rear stabilizer we have another jenga stack that goes even higher too. Last time I tried it, using all of our Cribbing essentially just slightly jerking the boom made the whole crane rock, so I canceled the job.

This was with Cribbing on asphalt, having done my damdest to get the outriggers centered over the jenga towers.

Anybody have good practices to reference, or outrigger pads? We're in the market for new ones anyway.
Are you doing this on a regular basis or occasionally ? Or do you live in a really hilly area ? I’ve never really had to go more then 3 layers, and if we did my cranes still stable, haven’t had any rocking moments.
 

flyingsquirrel25

Well-Known Member
I’ve run with cranes on square cribbing and I personally don’t like it. They are seldom as stable as bigger dunnage. The rental company we work with now had 4x12’s in multiple lengths (3’, 4’ And 5’) on every crane as the main cribbing. Then some 3” and a few 2” only for leveling a stack. We have gone pretty high and it’s still extremely stable.
82D22725-EADE-43DC-BCFC-3D42B868C6CF.jpeg
From last year98A00389-C18E-4011-A3E2-0D7F1A618C40.jpeg
Today21EF3C45-D5FB-45AD-A8B4-3FEAF25B1840.jpeg
Last summer
 

pctree

Well-Known Member
We roll with 6x6s 3' and 2' and on occasion have had 5 or so layers which got me thinking about having holes drilled in them at regular dimensions so we could insert rebar. Slewing off a stack would be a bad day. I really like the idea of 4x12s but have to consider if I have room, seems like twice the storage area but the stability is appealing.
We also have 3'x4' mats which I think really help and don't forget the sand bags
 

flyingsquirrel25

Well-Known Member
We roll with 6x6s 3' and 2' and on occasion have had 5 or so layers which got me thinking about having holes drilled in them at regular dimensions so we could insert rebar. Slewing off a stack would be a bad day. I really like the idea of 4x12s but have to consider if I have room, seems like twice the storage area but the stability is appealing.
We also have 3'x4' mats which I think really help and don't forget the sand bags
Yea they take a lot of space but if you are creative you sure can get a hell of a lot on a truck. This truck was designed by the owner for tree work when he bought it now. It showed up and the spent the time needed to get it right before burying it with work.
Blocks under the bed both sides, off the rear and a small stack on front of the deck for particularly unlevel set ups.43139B89-C6CD-4280-8DD1-6D7D4207B078.jpeg
 

flyingsquirrel25

Well-Known Member
Do you have a close up of how he attached the ropes to the ends?
I’ll look. When green they drill through each end and add threaded rod to prevent splitting. There have been several iterations of how to attach the rope some are drilled, counter sunk and knotted. Others I think may be inserted and a deck screw sent through to the top to hold it in place. The guy that milled the last batch put a ton of thought into it. Chose sweet gum for its strength, flexibility and durability. And routered all the edges to make them fancy looking. Much lighter thank the red oak 5’ers they got :risas2:.
 

flyingsquirrel25

Well-Known Member
i would think gum would rot too quick, never milled it before....
I think the idea is it has the opportunity to dry out after getting wet... and it doesn’t stay in constant contact with the ground. So gar they have held up alright but they are really only a year or two old so time will tell. I certainly like moving them around over the oak dunage.
Sorry no pict7of the ropes up close. I’ll have to try and remember to grab one next time we have a crane out.
 

rypie37

New Member
Are you doing this on a regular basis or occasionally ? Or do you live in a really hilly area ? I’ve never really had to go more then 3 layers, and if we did my cranes still stable, haven’t had any rocking moments.
Regular basis - 1-3 times per week, but rarely does slope come up to this degree.
 

rypie37

New Member
I’ve run with cranes on square cribbing and I personally don’t like it. They are seldom as stable as bigger dunnage. The rental company we work with now had 4x12’s in multiple lengths (3’, 4’ And 5’) on every crane as the main cribbing. Then some 3” and a few 2” only for leveling a stack. We have gone pretty high and it’s still extremely stable.
View attachment 52382
From last yearView attachment 52383
TodayView attachment 52384
Last summer
Yeah those pads look real sweet - I'm gonna have to track some down
 

flyingsquirrel25

Well-Known Member
Yeah those pads look real sweet - I'm gonna have to track some down
They are custom sawn. You won’t find them at Home Depot. But they are well worth the effort to find someone that will make them. It’s a great way to get rid of some shorter timber on a portable mill. Many can cut as short as 4’ and that’s pretty much junk for us unless you want to make firewood or you got a furniture maker locally.
 

Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
Theres a guy that cranes around here that has timbers for cribbing- 6x6. He drilled 1 inch holes in offsets in the timbers on each end. he inserts 12" lengths of rebar to lock each successive row. I thought it was pretty clever. there ain't no way the timbers will slip, but it is still required that the surface be reasonably level.
 

Chuck Diesel

New Member
I use 6x6, 4x6 and 4x4 then topped with 2 or 3 1.5"x12" laminated beams then the float pads. 85% of the time I sit on a 4'x4' cribbing.
For the extra time it takes to get out all the lumber is worth it to be stable.
 
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