Hey Look at My Crud...

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
The green stuff, to me, is classic Trichoderma viride. Need to see a microscope slide, to be sure. Now, there likely are many other Trichoderma species that it may be, but when I did my MS thesis in Shigo's Forest Service unit, that's what we would likely call it. Common soil-borne hyphomycete that pops up on above-ground sources of goodness, such as the "bleeding" branch stub which has associated "black yeast". I wouldn't be especially concerned unless I had an awfully large amount of paid free time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: evo

evo

Well-Known Member
The green stuff, to me, is classic Trichoderma viride. Need to see a microscope slide, to be sure. Now, there likely are many other Trichoderma species that it may be, but when I did my MS thesis in Shigo's Forest Service unit, that's what we would likely call it. Common soil-borne hyphomycete that pops up on above-ground sources of goodness, such as the "bleeding" branch stub which has associated "black yeast". I wouldn't be especially concerned unless I had an awfully large amount of paid free time.
Ha! Thanks much, so my hunch was right? Yeast infection on the branch stub, then the trichoderma colonized?

Here are a few more shots. 0C82EC84-EFDC-420E-B387-DEA0DC186BE5.jpegBBF02265-87C7-4909-81EE-7F26B4159056.jpeg
 
Last edited:

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
Yes, that sounds right. Species of Trichoderma are common on dead wood in ground contact. Those are big colonies aboveground, but readily believable. Some (most? all?) Trichoderma have mild exo-cellulytic activity. That mean they can break down purified cellulose in cell walls slowly, from the ends of cellulose microfibrils. They can't detectably break wood (cellulose and lignin and more in a complex relationship) down that would result in loss of wood strength.
 

guymayor

Well-Known Member
My input is to scrape away the dead stuff so you can monitor woundwood growth. And not to worry unless woundwood is colonized.
 

oldoakman

Well-Known Member
Kinda what I was thinking but I have never had my eyes on a positively id'd sample. Btw, congrats on the rose bowl win.
 

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
Definitely a good enough image for the genus. You and JD have it right as Hericium. As for species...this is what I think of as the tightly packed, short spined one. Distinct from the more apparently branched H. americanum, which we all were taught as H. coralloides at the time. And some have really long spines! The genus as monographed in the 1970-1980s is pretty clearly polyphyletic according to modern genetic studies.
 

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
You bet, I learn a lot here. I'm tuned in right now as a simple civilian. I'm a furloughed federal employee right now, and am enjoined from working. So this is not work!
 
  • Like
Reactions: evo

evo

Well-Known Member
You bet, I learn a lot here. I'm tuned in right now as a simple civilian. I'm a furloughed federal employee right now, and am enjoined from working. So this is not work!
Shitty time of year for lack of a paycheck, but hope you enjoy your vacation
 

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
Once again, I'll be foolish enough to hazard a guess. Assuming that these feel tightly attached, I suggest that this is an immature robust bracket. The big kids would say Fomitoporia robusta with a lot of others calling it Phellinus robustus. I say "immature" because young'uns lack an obvious and distinct upper pilear surface.
Now, if they are readily detached, I have no idea.
 

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
Yes, when the foliage is off, the knots are much more visible. They provide a certain gloom in silhouette against a grey sky on a winter afternoon.
 
Last edited:
I haven't seen 3 different fungi growing in the same spot like this before. I believe I see Inonotus dryadeus, Grifola frondosa and... maybe pleurotus ostreatus(?) I'm not sure on that last one, it's the one on the left of that bunch. Maybe @KTSmith knowsfile-94.jpeg
 
Last edited:
Top