Hey Look at My Crud...

JD3000

Well-Known Member
Ganoderma on a declining pear. 20181008_184601.jpgI'd say G. sessile/lucidum but read about a few that all look pretty similar from afar.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Don’t know? Ganoderma applanatum and a strip of dead wood on the main stem. Loctus.436AA56C-E0F5-4E3D-AA43-C5F138AF98BA.jpeg
 

JD3000

Well-Known Member
Funny you should mention that. Just ordered my folks a salad bowl of spalted boxelder
 
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KTSmith

Well-Known Member
Lovely bowl! What does "salted" mean in the above sense? Are the black dots Ambrosia beetle tunnels? I reckon they may be the induction stimulus for the red discoloration. I'd be interested in knowing if the red staining will stay red!
 

JD3000

Well-Known Member
Lovely bowl! What does "salted" mean in the above sense? Are the black dots Ambrosia beetle tunnels? I reckon they may be the induction stimulus for the red discoloration. I'd be interested in knowing if the red staining will stay red!
Woops, autocorrect strikes again.
Spalted
 

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KTSmith

Well-Known Member
Sorry, I should have recognized "spalted" in there. I usually limit that to wood that is bleached and/or containing zone lines. But I don't know precisely how ace woodworkers use the term.
Thanks for the Morse article, I reviewed an early draft of that one. I have no quibble with it. I've spoken with coauthor Bob Blanchette on that, a real giant in wood decay research. They did isolate specific fungi in the streaks, but they were more the effect than the cause of the staining. Sure, their statement on "nonspecific wounding" is patho-speak for that all sorts of wounding agents induce the same colors. No problem there! I was just seeing those black bits that looked like ambrosia beetle tunnels.
Indeed lovely woodworking!
 

JD3000

Well-Known Member
Yeah wood workers seem to throw around spalting as any kind of discoloration.

I'm told one should get that wood worked and finished quickly as the red can fade rather quickly
 

evo

Well-Known Member
This is one I’m trying to figure out. I find it only on western hemlock somewhat commonly. I also associate it with stem failures 10-40’ or so. Nearly always occurs on branch stubs or pruning cuts.

I’m leaning that it’s some type of yeast wet wood, perhaps associated with some sort of brittle stem decay.

ANY input is very welcome. @southsoundtree @guymayor @Evan Sussman @KTSmith42D9AB97-C5DF-4079-A4C0-4A6FEEA6972C.jpeg
 
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