Hey Crafty Sewing Types!

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
I’m just about ready to put a project under the needle, and have a couple sourcing q’s for those of you acquainted with the materials we often see in the trade. Disclaimer- nothing will be for rated use, only accessory, but needs to be extremely durable. @yoyoman , Casey (forget your handle), and others-

When sewing vinyl, cordura, and poly webbing, what thread type/size should I use? Different types for different materials?

Also, I’m finding that there are many types of flat polyester webbing. Is there one in particular that you find durable enough for regular use, yet thin (or thick) enough to work well with buckles and sliders? Right now I’m using 2” wide, if that makes a difference in your answers.

What are some good suppliers for more vinyl and cordura?

I have some materials through a trade, but don’t know their specs and sources. They are what I want, but I don’t know how to get more.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
I don’t know what’s best, but you are only limited to the machine you have.
Things like the vinyl you want a wide stitch spacing. If it’s too narrow you simply are just creating a perforated line to tear out. The wider the spacing the larger thread you have to use.
Most home machines max out at #69 thread, some complain and others don’t as much. The tricky part is adjusting the bobbin tension.
Just use the corresponding needle often labled for jeans or canvas. Leather needles can work, but they typically have a pyramid style sharpened point that cuts the material to force a hole to form.
Depending on the vinyl you have it should have a backing

Well gotta tend to the baby, there’s more but others will chime in
 

New2trees

Active Member
Got a Husqvarna Viking 6440 machine. Not commercial duty but its supposed to be one of the toughest home machines ever built. Plan to take my expired harness from my racecar (they expire every 2 yrs ) and built a chest harness. Looking forward to following this thread.
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
I don’t know what’s best, but you are only limited to the machine you have.
Things like the vinyl you want a wide stitch spacing. If it’s too narrow you simply are just creating a perforated line to tear out. The wider the spacing the larger thread you have to use.
Most home machines max out at #69 thread, some complain and others don’t as much. The tricky part is adjusting the bobbin tension.
Just use the corresponding needle often labled for jeans or canvas. Leather needles can work, but they typically have a pyramid style sharpened point that cuts the material to force a hole to form.
Depending on the vinyl you have it should have a backing

Well gotta tend to the baby, there’s more but others will chime in
Thanks, evo. I was patient and found a decent machine that will handle the workload. It’s not necessarily designed for it, but is a hardy, older machine in great running order. I just have to take my time through stacked layers.

As far as backing for the vinyl, there will be an insert between two layers, and it has a poly grid reinforcement (normal construction, I assume?).

I currently have leather needles. Think there will be a problem as long as I keep the stitching long (5-7)?
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
Got a Husqvarna Viking 6440 machine. Not commercial duty but its supposed to be one of the toughest home machines ever built. Plan to take my expired harness from my racecar (they expire every 2 yrs ) and built a chest harness. Looking forward to following this thread.
That sounds like a cool machine.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
My 1953 vintage Pfaff will punch through two layers of tubular webbing...slowly. I don't reverse stitch because it's not a walking foot and the layers slip and break needles.

When I was learning about material durability I'd watch how gear was used by professionals...canoe outfitters..dog sledding...outdoor ed programs like Outward Bound, and, of course arbos. My conclusion was that the only places I saw webbing wear was at rub points on stationary metal fasteners.

Also seams blew out because cheap thread from the factory on off-brand gear.

My stash of parts has been culled from discarded gear found on the curb for the trash. The fasteners, clips and clasps are sorted into a three drawer Plano box. Longer pieces of webbing and cordage are sorted too. If I'm making some doo dad I'll probably reuse scavenged pieces. of webbing. If the project is more permanent I use new webbing. Car seat belts have been given a new life too

I bought a spool of 1" flat, single layer, webbing from a vendor in Seattle I think. They have a rep of being the go-to supplier of quality materials.
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
Was the flat webbing compatible with a lot of your hardware? If so, do you have record of the thickness and other specs?
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Yes...same material as the manufacturers use. No specs. I guess I could mic the thickness but it all seems to feel the same. If the flat webbing is going through buckles I make sure that I use the stuff that's stiff and doesn't fold easily. Soft webbing is more likely to fold and cross in a buckle or slider...grrrrr!
 

Burrapeg

Well-Known Member
X2 on what Tom said. Old seat belts from wrecking yards are usually excellent quality webbing. Also, leather needles take more force if using on webbing since they have a chisel point instead of a true point. They cut a hole rather than just force the material apart. Leather requires that type of needle but it works against you on other material. Instead of just slipping in, they have to actually cut a few strands in front of the chisel edge. A tip my late wife showed me once, to hold stuff like that together temporarily while you run it through the machine, is to use tiny spots of hot glue between the parts. The stuff dries instantly and stays rubbery, and a needle passes right thru a thin bit of it, no problemo.
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
My mom uses purple Elmer’s because it washes out once you stitch layers. I have both, so I’ll have to experiment.
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
All the input has been great, thanks! My most pressing issue currently is thread, though.

As for webbing, I have new, 2” seatbelt webbing, but am considering a more traditional webbing, as I know seatbelt webbing is prone to faster edge wear and picking. At least in my experience.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
I'm not an expert...but thought I'd chime in on the thread. I use Coats Art D71

http://www.makeitcoats.com/us/product/coats-outdoor-living-thread-d71/

It is a UV resistant polyester. Thicker than "normal" thread, but not super thick. I've never had a problem with the thread failing. I don't make anything for life support - just accessories.

Bought it at Hobby Lobby, JoAnn's, or Walmart as those are the only places in town that I know of selling thread and probably listed in order of where I'd go looking.
 

39Buick

Active Member
Great Topic!! One never knows what will show up in a tree cutting/climbing forum!! This will be one that I will follow.
I modified my suspenders to hold my chest roller and eliminated the extra harness originally used when I first started using the device. The added 2" webbing and buckle also keep my shoulder straps from separating and makes the whole system much more comfortable!
If I recall this place has a lot of options for webbing and threads!
https://www.strapworks.com/default.asp
I second what @ATH mentioned about accessories only for me!
 

Bango Skank

Well-Known Member
https://www.ebay.com/itm/S-Lon-Superlon-TEX-400-Heavy-Macrame-Twist-Nylon-Beading-Crafting-Cord-1-of-3/222262988582?hash=item33bfe80f26:m:mfZU5lqKTBYVcTIbyhZQjcw

This stuff is pretty tough. It's .9 mm nylon 3 strand. I've made a foot loop for a homemade knee ascender, and played with sewn eyes on rope and sewn loop runners. I haven't been entirely satisfied with my results yet, but I keep practicing with my speedy stitcher. Webbing is easy to sew, rope is much harder to make pretty looking eyes.

1" tubular nylon webbing can be bought bulk in 10 or 20 yards. Suitable for life support. Thus far I will trust a beer knot more than my sewing.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
My 1953 vintage Pfaff will punch through two layers of tubular webbing...slowly. I don't reverse stitch because it's not a walking foot and the layers slip and break needles.

When I was learning about material durability I'd watch how gear was used by professionals...canoe outfitters..dog sledding...outdoor ed programs like Outward Bound, and, of course arbos. My conclusion was that the only places I saw webbing wear was at rub points on stationary metal fasteners.

Also seams blew out because cheap thread from the factory on off-brand gear.

My stash of parts has been culled from discarded gear found on the curb for the trash. The fasteners, clips and clasps are sorted into a three drawer Plano box. Longer pieces of webbing and cordage are sorted too. If I'm making some doo dad I'll probably reuse scavenged pieces. of webbing. If the project is more permanent I use new webbing. Car seat belts have been given a new life too

I bought a spool of 1" flat, single layer, webbing from a vendor in Seattle I think. They have a rep of being the go-to supplier of quality materials.
The old school Paff's are bomber for most home gear tasks. Around here they are highly sought after with the boating crowd. Their downfall is the belt drive, once it breaks it's done.. Keep all oil off the belt as it will break it down over the years.

I agree often there is no need to reverse stitch, just rotate the piece being sewn for a back stitch.

Leather needles will work, and can be dulled. A fine sharpening stone and the needle in a drill works well.

What machine are you working with? I am personally looking for a hand crank for my setups. When I'm doing webbing the stitches are only a few inches long, and I would rather work on perfection over speed. I am unclear on what 5-7 for spacing is on your machine. Some a metric, some not, some out of adjustment. Run a sheet of paper through and then measure the spacing. IF I remember correctly #69 thread has about 10lbs strength, in a stitch it works out to 16lbs derating for the thread on thread bend (just like a knot). Do the math for how many stitches you need (think 5K lbs for tubular webbing) run in slightly diagonal lines for full strength. I get your not doing life support, but make it bomber!
 

evo

Well-Known Member
I make my own rope bags.. On a Paff with zigzag. I use the zigzag to get wider spacing, and leave ample material between the stitch and cut edge. I also use thin 2" webbing for handles which also reinforces the seams.
I haven't got my new National walking foot set up yet, but just playing around it will sew two layer of thick belt leather!! up to 3/8 thick! Just can't seem to find my #138 thread...

This is a good source of thread, needles, and the such.. https://www.sailrite.com/boat-canvaswork
 

B Dietrich

New Member
I use bonded nylon thread with a weight of Tex 70. I think that's the heaviest recommended thread for a home sewing machine. It works great for webbing, 1000 denier Cordura, leather, and the like.
 

yoyoman

Well-Known Member
....Leather needles can work, but they typically have a pyramid style sharpened point that cuts the material to force a hole to form...
This bears repeating like a hundred times. Don't even try to sharpen them or change them, you will damage the fabric. Sew leather with leather needles and sew fabric with fabric needles. Probably 138 or 207 min for life support.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
This bears repeating like a hundred times. Don't even try to sharpen them or change them, you will damage the fabric. Sew leather with leather needles and sew fabric with fabric needles. Probably 138 or 207 min for life support.
I’ve done it. None for life support, and with a super fine ceramic stone it works great. Even looked at the finished product with a hand lense. Would I do so in a life support situation? HELL NO! Context my friend, we are talking gear bags and chest tenders
 

yoyoman

Well-Known Member
I’ve done it. None for life support, and with a super fine ceramic stone it works great. Even looked at the finished product with a hand lense. Would I do so in a life support situation? HELL NO! Context my friend, we are talking gear bags and chest tenders
Good point, I get a little obsessed with not mixing those needles.
 
Top