HELP!!! Rigging and Backups (Newbie here)

#1
I need some affordable suggestions on what you guys are using in tree for rigging and backups for safely lowering branches/limbs/trunk sections. Photos, weblinks, youtube video links, books/dvd's any and all lol. Any photos or videos of the hardware in use would be great as well.

Im a fairly new climber, with 8 years rigging experience non-tree based. I worked offshore oilfield prior to this new career path. So i have a very good grasp/professional training on the rigging subject just not so much knowledge of the hardware used, whether it be homemade or store bought I want to see what you guys are using and what works best for y'all.


Thanks in advance for the help and information guys and gals.
 
Last edited:

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
#2
Welcome to Treebuzz

Take some time to read through the archives. There is 16 years of shared knowledge there

The most important part of rigging and climbing in trees is to learn how to determine the strength of the rigging/ tie in point. Trees are much more variable than industrial scenarios
 

JeffGu

Well-Known Member
#3
These subjects are covered heavily on the forums, but it's my personal opinion that a new thread on the subjects already covered isn't a bad thing... rather cool to see where everybody stands after some time has passed, and perspectives change over time.

Although I have rigging ropes/equipment for the big stuff, I'm not alone when I say that folks new to the tree business (especially if they work solo or with small crews) would be better off spending their money on light to medium rigging gear. I am amazed at how many guys and gals who toted 3/4" ropes and gear around for years have switched to doing most of their rigging on 1/2" ropes/gear. Unless you are in a fast production environment on a tight schedule, on really big trees, it just makes sense to slow down a bit and take smaller chunks. From a safety standpoint, you're a lot less likely to damage property and humans or get in way over your head. The equipment is much cheaper. There is a lot less wear and tear, and you can afford more equipment at startup when you go light.

1/2" rigging lets you use several things that save you money. First, any 1/2" climbing line works great for light rigging... this lets you try new climb lines and put the old ones to good use immediately. You can use the 12-strand climbing/rigging ropes... which are very affordable and do a great job. You don't need monster friction brakes, or huge blocks for your rigging. There are also in-tree, aerial friction devices that allow a climber to lower branches themselves from in the tree.

My personal favorites are:
The Stein RC-1000
The Stein RC-2000
Very tough, well built and durable. Although it's heavier, I use the RC-2000 the most because the bend radius is larger (easier on the ropes).

Omni Block 2.6
Best thing for light rigging to come out in a long time, as far as blocks go.

Notch Ogre 12-strand
Yale XTC 16-strand
Both are affordable and work great. The 16-strand climb line works especially well in the aerial friction devices.

AFB
Rig 'N Wrench
I like both of these, up to about 300 lbs. for the RnW and up to about 500 lbs. with the AFB. They'll handle more, but that's where I feel safe with them.

There's a lot of good stuff out there. If I had to start all over today, that's the stuff I'd buy all over again, right off the bat. I'd probably just get the RC-2000 for a friction brake, and just the RnW for aerial friction to start... but I don't regret having the overkill. If something does break, I'm not done for the day... it's just a minor delay to grab another device and keep going.
 
#6
I have been switching most of my rigging over from pullies to rings. Don't get me wrong I love my OmniBlocks, like JeffGu mentioned, but for speed and productivity the ring and ring rigging points and beast rings on a ultrasling make fast work of a canopy.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
Can you list some examples of "Rigging Rings/Beast Rings" dumb it down for the newb not familiar with all the hardware lingo yet lol
 

Tyler Durden

Well-Known Member
#8
Same principal as a friction saver for climbing use, just beefed up for rigging. Like the guys are saying, as long as you are cutting safe, half inch gear should handle most things you get in to.
Also, don't over complicate things, never underestimate some 12 or 16 strand and a natural crotch.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 
#9
I need some affordable suggestions on what you guys are using in tree for rigging and backups for safely lowering branches/limbs/trunk sections. Photos, weblinks, youtube video links, books/dvd's any and all lol. Any photos or videos of the hardware in use would be great as well.

Im a fairly new climber, with 8 years rigging experience non-tree based. I worked offshore oilfield prior to this new career path. So i have a very good grasp/professional training on the rigging subject just not so much knowledge of the hardware used, whether it be homemade or store bought I want to see what you guys are using and what works best for y'all.


Thanks in advance for the help and information guys and gals.
 

NE Tree

Well-Known Member
#15

colb

Well-Known Member
#17
I would start out with a safebloc, which can also be used as a ring, a cheap base friction device like a portawrap, and 5 speedline clips. Use the safebloc as a terminal rigging point with aerial friction for busting tops out, then use the portawrap for the larger wood. Natural crotch rigging does also provide aerial friction, for free, but choose your rope construction so that it is suited to the abuse. Some guys use the safebloc as an aerial friction device while also using the portawrap for base friction, but I think there is discussion (that I don't understand) on whether that is a good idea.

Use the speedline clips whenever you can, before taking out other kit, and also use them for rigging redirects. Unweighted speedline can come off the log, so put them downstream of a branch union or avoid negative blocking configurations with them. I tried to speedline 300lbs of sweetgum spar on an x ring sling once and ended up replacing a few patio tiles because the girth hitch went slack and fell off...

1/2 rope is the way to go, but a short 130-150' hank of 3/4" is better for most of the larger logs you'll meet - particularly low spar crotches which are generally wider than the adjacent trunk, of greater density, and harder to rig in shorter chunks without some serious rope slot carving... Get lines with high elongation to give yourself a safety buffer while getting started. Low elongation lines are nice in close proximity to roof lines, and for speedlining. You can make a high elongation line behave like a low elongation line (or even as a positive bungee) by applying mechanical advantage to tighten it. I shot a piece sideways out and around an adjacent tree last week on a tightened high elongation speedline before having it go back the opposite direction towards my brush pile. Make sure you understand side loading forces vs. vertical trunk loading forces before going too crazy with the speedlining (I was, pragmatically, not on the rigging spar for that shot, lol).

Mechanical advantage: bumper pull with hitch cord to secure line and capture progress, cmi rope jack, 5:1 pulley system
 
#18
I would start out with a safebloc, which can also be used as a ring, a cheap base friction device like a portawrap, and 5 speedline clips. Use the safebloc as a terminal rigging point with aerial friction for busting tops out, then use the portawrap for the larger wood. Natural crotch rigging does also provide aerial friction, for free, but choose your rope construction so that it is suited to the abuse. Some guys use the safebloc as an aerial friction device while also using the portawrap for base friction, but I think there is discussion (that I don't understand) on whether that is a good idea.

Use the speedline clips whenever you can, before taking out other kit, and also use them for rigging redirects. Unweighted speedline can come off the log, so put them downstream of a branch union or avoid negative blocking configurations with them. I tried to speedline 300lbs of sweetgum spar on an x ring sling once and ended up replacing a few patio tiles because the girth hitch went slack and fell off...

1/2 rope is the way to go, but a short 130-150' hank of 3/4" is better for most of the larger logs you'll meet - particularly low spar crotches which are generally wider than the adjacent trunk, of greater density, and harder to rig in shorter chunks without some serious rope slot carving... Get lines with high elongation to give yourself a safety buffer while getting started. Low elongation lines are nice in close proximity to roof lines, and for speedlining. You can make a high elongation line behave like a low elongation line (or even as a positive bungee) by applying mechanical advantage to tighten it. I shot a piece sideways out and around an adjacent tree last week on a tightened high elongation speedline before having it go back the opposite direction towards my brush pile. Make sure you understand side loading forces vs. vertical trunk loading forces before going too crazy with the speedlining (I was, pragmatically, not on the rigging spar for that shot, lol).

Mechanical advantage: bumper pull with hitch cord to secure line and capture progress, cmi rope jack, 5:1 pulley system
Speedline clips? Portawrap??? Newbie here
 
#20
speedline is just a zipline, the clips are caribiners with a round sling on them, you girth hitch the branch and clip it to the zipline then when u cut it it zips down to wherever you have the other end, saves time and $ since ground guys dont have to drag branches all that way. you can easily make your own set with some cheap steel biners and some loop runners, i got 1 24" runners for 45 buks and 1 steel biners for not much more, saves a ton of time. a porta wrap or porty or wrap is a device u put at the base of the tree that u wrap the rigging lines around to create friction so 1 guy can hold alot more weight safetly than he could without it. get the largest porty u can get, dont go small u will only need another one later. there are lots of great informative videos on youtube, when i first started arborpod was great for learning different techniques. i suggest learning your cuts first and foremost, being able to control the direction the wood goes is key to everything
 
Top