Hauling purchased trailers across states

CutHighnLetFly

Well-Known Member
#1
Gotta go pick up a trailer from.a private sale in PA from Mass. Where do i find the info i need to figure out how to legally transport it back? Not really sure how to approach this, im not registering it in my state before going incase i travel out to see a buttered up POS.
Thanks for any input
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
#3
I'd just call your DMV and explain it to them...

If they aren't helpful...do you have another trailer that you own and can take the plate off of that for the day?
 

CutHighnLetFly

Well-Known Member
#4
Im worries about being pulled over in another state if i used a different trailer plate.
Ill look into a trip permit but i (knowing nothing about this) thoufht if i went to me dmv in MA it wont help in like jersey or ststes inbtween my trip
 

JeffGu

Well-Known Member
#5
Get a bill of sale, dated... all 50 states give you some time to plate a new purchase, and since none of them require liability insurance on carry-on type trailers, you usually have about 10 days or so before you have to have plates on it. Just be sure your tow vehicle is legal and there's no weed in the glove box. The only thing that's likely to get you pulled over is the lights not working if you'll be driving at night. Well, that and driving 100 MPH while drunk.
 

CutHighnLetFly

Well-Known Member
#6
Get a bill of sale, dated... all 50 states give you some time to plate a new purchase, and since none of them require liability insurance on carry-on type trailers, you usually have about 10 days or so before you have to have plates on it. Just be sure your tow vehicle is legal and there's no weed in the glove box. The only thing that's likely to get you pulled over is the lights not working if you'll be driving at night. Well, that and driving 100 MPH while drunk.
Thank you Jeff, once i read it, it seemed so obvious. Thats pretty simple.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
#8
What is the likelihood of:
A) Getting pulled over?
B) Somebody recognizing the the wrong plate is on the wrong trailer even if they do pull over?

I don't think that is a desirable option to bring plates from another trailer...but if they don't give you any other options, it is probably what I would do.

Certainly less likely to get pulled over than if you have no plate on the trailer. Again, easy to explain with the bill of sale and copy of title if they do ask more questions. HOWEVER, if no plate is, in fact, the legal way to go as @JeffGu says, than that is certainly what I would do...but I'm surprised they are OK with no plates, even for a day or two. Again...call the DMV.

Of course, keeping current plates on the trailer is an option too if the current owner is OK with that (I wouldn't be if I were the one selling it).
 

rugger01

Active Member
#9
The no plate option is only allowed in some states. I bought a trailer from a dealer in RI last fall and they said no plate was fine but not so much in MA. I went with a plate off another trailer and dont act like a rabbit and the fox wont chase.
 

JeffGu

Well-Known Member
#10
Yeah, this stuff varies from state to state... Nebraska is a no-plate state, making your own "in transit" sign will actually attract their attention. But, the cops generally don't make trailers a high priority. Last year, I forgot to put the sticker on the plate on one of mine. Finally got it put on there the other day... with one month left before I need to get a new one. Been dragging it all over the state, and nobody noticed. I brought it back here from the east coast when I bought it, with no plates, and never got stopped.
 

CutHighnLetFly

Well-Known Member
#11
What is the likelihood of:
A) Getting pulled over?
B) Somebody recognizing the the wrong plate is on the wrong trailer even if they do pull over?

I don't think that is a desirable option to bring plates from another trailer...but if they don't give you any other options, it is probably what I would do.

Certainly less likely to get pulled over than if you have no plate on the trailer. Again, easy to explain with the bill of sale and copy of title if they do ask more questions. HOWEVER, if no plate is, in fact, the legal way to go as @JeffGu says, than that is certainly what I would do...but I'm surprised they are OK with no plates, even for a day or two. Again...call the DMV.

Of course, keeping current plates on the trailer is an option too if the current owner is OK with that (I wouldn't be if I were the one selling it).
All i can think is if there was some reason to pull me over or aomething, having a false plate is going to give me zero credibility on conversation. Thanks for giving me some direction guys
 
#12
In Ohio you can legally use any current plates on vehicles / trailers for up to 45 days. Same rules as a state issue temp plate but no extra trip to the BMV and no extra fee. Just have the dated bill of sale on yoy and make sure the plates are good.
 
#14
also if it's something like a chipper/stump grinder/sawmill/etc that isn't designed to haul a load. You technically don't need plates in most states
As long as your not hauling a load on it.
Same with a truck here in Michigan, but put a trailer behind a truck like that or a load on a trailer and you'll get a fat ticket if they catch you.
Most officers have their pet tickets, they specialize in writing only a few tickets. Have you ever gotten pulled over and it was as if the guy wasn't sure what to write you up for, it's because he wasn't and that's why he let you go. Most likely even if the OP gets pulled over without a plate they will only check his registration/insurance/drivers license and send you on your way, that is unless it's DOT.
The only state I'd be concerned with is MA myself, find out what they say and roll with that.
What kind of trailer are you looking at.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
#15
Just a little side track here...this doesn't apply to your situation

In Minnesota any trailer under 3k# load limit gets a permanent registration. Pay once for the registration and that's it. A small sticker goes on the tongue, no plate

A few years ago someone in finance at Capital found that it cost more to title and plate the small trailers than they could collect in fees. Instead of raising the fees to make it a for-profit operation they changed to permanent.

What a treat to see government operate like that! What other state would de-fund a revenue stream to benefit itself and its constituents?

Back to the regularly scheduled broadcast
 

evo

Well-Known Member
#16
Just a little side track here...this doesn't apply to your situation

In Minnesota any trailer under 3k# load limit gets a permanent registration. Pay once for the registration and that's it. A small sticker goes on the tongue, no plate

A few years ago someone in finance at Capital found that it cost more to title and plate the small trailers than they could collect in fees. Instead of raising the fees to make it a for-profit operation they changed to permanent.

What a treat to see government operate like that! What other state would de-fund a revenue stream to benefit itself and its constituents?

Back to the regularly scheduled broadcast
Round here our counties bus system is free. They did the math, and the cost of collecting fairs, installing machines etc didn’t pencil out.
 
#20
Just a little side track here...this doesn't apply to your situation

In Minnesota any trailer under 3k# load limit gets a permanent registration. Pay once for the registration and that's it. A small sticker goes on the tongue, no plate

A few years ago someone in finance at Capital found that it cost more to title and plate the small trailers than they could collect in fees. Instead of raising the fees to make it a for-profit operation they changed to permanent.

What a treat to see government operate like that! What other state would de-fund a revenue stream to benefit itself and its constituents?

Back to the regularly scheduled broadcast
Reports of gov't doing this help restore my faith in humanity.
 
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