Gerasimek's Tree-mek

In less than 8 years 50% of tree work will be done with these machines. Brace yourselves as we are about to go through an awkward molting phase over the next few years. Many changes will take place much for the good and some not so good. These machines will change the way all things are done, as Keith at Palfleet Tiffin said " you are doing industrial tree work in an urban setting".
Three questions you will want to ask your builder, 1: What happens after the sale and I have breakdown? 2: What parts do you have in stock for my machine model number? 3: Do you have techs that will come and fix my machine if needed?

These three things have made the difference for us. I don't care about saving $20k when I am out of work for even 2 days let alone 3 months. Understand how these things work, if you have a relationship then they go out of their way to help you. They may even pull a part off a new machine and overnight it to you if they don't have it in parts. While the guys having these problems are not yet speaking socially about, it its happening. Uptime is everything as the future of tree work is about to get even more competitive.
 
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pctree

Well-Known Member
I hope it is a BS claim too.
I was riding my MTB tonight (as I do to decompress) and I had a horrible thought Jerad and maybe this is where your head is already at..... What if some motherfucker does the math and realizes the ROI rate of TreeMecs and buys thousands of these things and drives costs so low to put us under so he has a monopoly on our industry....

Sleep well tree people...
 

allmark

Well-Known Member
I don't think 50% of tree work will be done with these machines. Yes, Certain companies will use these to do the majority of their work with them. There are many more companies out there that focus on more care of the trees than the removals. It is an excellent tool and has its place in the tree industry. To say it is a game changer is marketing in my opinion. It is no different than the rope wrench, GRCS, Blakes hitch, VT, Ergovation, Treemotion, Kbooms and many other tools that have been developed. They will save many injuries both chronic and acute in the industry, but if not used correctly can hurt the industry just as easily. Every tool has a good and proper application.
There are many companies that have a different business plan the kboom and grapple saw or kboom alone don't perform better for them than a stick crane. It is important to realize this as we move forward as an industry.
 
I can see your perspective on that but it is not coming from owning one (treemek). Of course not all tree work will be done with them, I should have been more specific. Why would I come up with this figure and have no evidence? Because pctree is going in the right thought direction, these machines are versatile, nimble and very efficient. We use ours to trim with as well (finish cuts by hand) when the situation calls for it. The reason I know it will be this way is because money will lead it there. No evidence needed as it is a universally known fact. I don't think it can be stopped or managed but just accepted. We will gain much but will lose some too. You can pm on my private thoughts on some matters but here is not the place.
 
I see companies running into trouble with these. To many moving parts to break, to much down time and once they are out of warranty I can promise you that the dealer will make you wish you never bought it with the repair bills.
The monthly payment will be tough if work slows down ( insurance, tax and maintenance) and keeping salt off it during the winter would drive me nuts. $400k is a big nut, that thing will have to be going 5 days a week. Once you invest in this equipment you won't enjoy down time during the winter either. It's also something that wouldn't be easy to sell if you had to.
I don't see it being ideal for lots of trees, the farther away the tree the smaller the piece, and it doesn't pick like a crane so you'll have trouble working pieces around other trees once the piece flips over. It's a big truck that'll have limited access. Yes, there will be lots of trees that this will be ideal for, but $400k I want equipment that can get to every single tree.
These are just starting to enter my market in Fairfield County CT. The big removal companies are starting to buy them, with every other piece of equipment they can think of. The biggest problem I see with these is sending an employee out and taking to big of a cut.
They might work out for some guys, if the economy turns they could get into trouble pretty quickly.
 

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
I see companies running into trouble with these. To many moving parts to break, to much down time and once they are out of warranty I can promise you that the dealer will make you wish you never bought it with the repair bills.
The monthly payment will be tough if work slows down ( insurance, tax and maintenance) and keeping salt off it during the winter would drive me nuts. $400k is a big nut, that thing will have to be going 5 days a week. Once you invest in this equipment you won't enjoy down time during the winter either. It's also something that wouldn't be easy to sell if you had to.
I don't see it being ideal for lots of trees, the farther away the tree the smaller the piece, and it doesn't pick like a crane so you'll have trouble working pieces around other trees once the piece flips over. It's a big truck that'll have limited access. Yes, there will be lots of trees that this will be ideal for, but $400k I want equipment that can get to every single tree.
These are just starting to enter my market in Fairfield County CT. The big removal companies are starting to buy them, with every other piece of equipment they can think of. The biggest problem I see with these is sending an employee out and taking to big of a cut.
They might work out for some guys, if the economy turns they could get into trouble pretty quickly.
I think you could use a little more research on these units. You’re way off the mark on a bunch of points.
 

deevo

Well-Known Member
Thanks Steve! I probably should have specified that I am in Ontario, Canada. Does that change your answer?
Yes depending on the size of your crane you need a license for that size, to start you need your 0-8 ton, then 0-15,then red seal you can run pretty much any sized mobile crane, it’s easier getting a crane license in the US and Bs red tape stuff then here though. Owning a crane gives you better options also, instead of an apprenticeship if your working for someone you can challenge the 0-15 and red seal. Glad to see you on the buzz
Devon
 
Yes depending on the size of your crane you need a license for that size, to start you need your 0-8 ton, then 0-15,then red seal you can run pretty much any sized mobile crane, it’s easier getting a crane license in the US and Bs red tape stuff then here though. Owning a crane gives you better options also, instead of an apprenticeship if your working for someone you can challenge the 0-15 and red seal. Glad to see you on the buzz
Devon
Thanks Devon. Still a long way off from actually owning a crane, but I’m definitely interested in including it in our long term plan. Nice to know which ducks I need to line up when the time comes.

Long time lurker, first time poster


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