Figure 8 as top anchor when rescuing a climber

yoyoman

Well-Known Member
I believe it is by definition set from above the victim. This is a very specific scenario, pick off an injured/disabled climber off a spar with the rescuer using a DdRT system. The original post did not detail the overall scenario but from the looks of it the rescuer spikes up the spar (or swing/traverses) from a nearby tree if available and efficient) and installs the anchor above the victim. The F8 does the friction mediation job simply and with inexpensive gear that most climbers have at hand. I like it.

I imagine most trained arb rescuers would think in terms of installing an anchored/redirected lowering rope, belayed from the ground with any of the "whistle test" belay devices rated for the use. This approach allows a simple solo rescue for example in a two-person crew where a third person is not available on the ground to perform the belayed lowering and there are only two lines in play, the victim's and the rescuer's. Assumption is the victim's line is damaged or not trusted. Another tool in the mental kit.
-AJ
Probably how I would do it given the scenario with the gear that is normally in my bag. Photos below. In a single configuration I use the anchor cinch as my lanyard on the way up, or in conjunction with my lanyard. If I have to pass the victim's lanyard to attach above I can do that. Using my prototype added friction for The Hitchhiker X I can hard connect with the victim and bring us both down on that single line. If I want to do it in a double rope configuration, I use the ring to ring I have, using it as a lanyard, spiking up the tree and or in conjunction with my lanyard, once I reach the victim we can both come down on the doubles moving rope as it is the added friction on The Hitchhiker X. If mechanical advantage is needed two lists the victim I can do so with a 3:1 on the single rope or a 5:1 with the addition of a single prusik or rope grab.


20190326_123247.jpg

20190326_123341.jpg

20190326_123424.jpg

20190326_124354.jpg
 

peder-d

Member
I believe it is by definition set from above the victim. This is a very specific scenario, pick off an injured/disabled climber off a spar with the rescuer using a DdRT system. The original post did not detail the overall scenario but from the looks of it the rescuer spikes up the spar (or swing/traverses) from a nearby tree if available and efficient) and installs the anchor above the victim. The F8 does the friction mediation job simply and with inexpensive gear that most climbers have at hand. I like it.

I imagine most trained arb rescuers would think in terms of installing an anchored/redirected lowering rope, belayed from the ground with any of the "whistle test" belay devices rated for the use. This approach allows a simple solo rescue for example in a two-person crew where a third person is not available on the ground to perform the belayed lowering and there are only two lines in play, the victim's and the rescuer's. Assumption is the victim's line is damaged or not trusted. Another tool in the mental kit.
-AJ
You are spot on :)

The idea is to teach a simple and not gear demanding setup. To learn the students to use what they already have on their harness.
Rescue scenario is a pickoff rescue (injured climber with a damaged climbing system) on a spar. Rescuer is on a DdRT System.
We tested the prusik loading on the rescuer system. Rescuer weight was 90 kg and the casualty was 100 kg.
Normal load on rescuer prusik in a standard DdRT System through a teufelberger fimbl Climb was 30 kg. After adding the injured climber (90 kg + 100kg) the load on the prusik was 70 kg (too much for it to perform safely).
After adding the figure 8 as the top anchor, the prusik load was 30 kg again.
 
Top