Fertilizing, not all it's cracked up to be?

Discussion in 'Pesticides and Ferts' started by cody willard, Oct 16, 2017.

  1. cody willard

    cody willard New Member

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    So for the last year and a half I've been studying to gain might be BCMA. I've read a lot of books on fertilization and typical PHC stuff. The more I read about fertilization the more I see how other companies might be miss using it. It really seems like it can be a two edged sword.

    So many companies with PHC programs try to sell fertilization for every single tree, and from what I have studyed, it seems very few trees actually need fertilization. Many articles and books pointed to the fact that mildly stressed tree sometimes are even more disease and pest resistant due to increased secondary metabolites, sap flow or cuticle thicknesses.

    Also where I live storm damage is always a concern due to High winds, from what I've read, constantly fertilizing increases growth rate, but the quick growth generally is weaker then slower growth which can increase possibility of storm damage later in the future.

    One company I know fertilizes every tree on a property, and I know some of the trees had scale and he told the customer fertilization will help keep the tree healthy and ward off the scale. I think few people know that many insects benefit from higher nitrogen content in trees. I read a book on Scale insects, and trees with higher nitrogen content increased there reproduction cycle, extended their life expectancy, and hardened and their shells which could make it more difficult for other predators to attack them.

    I believe there's definitely a reason to fertilize certain trees but only after a proper soil and foliage analysis has been done. It makes sense to the Home owner to fertilize every tree, just like you do a garden, you fertilize it to get better crops. I think it's a really easy sell to people who are wanting it, but many times it sold for the wrong reasons.

    What are your guys thoughts? Am I way off base?
     
    JD3000 and RopeShield like this.
  2. RopeShield

    RopeShield Well-Known Member

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    Low salt index ferts
    Organic ferts
    Compost and mulch and turf removal is 1st choice
    Your right, a lot of soil enviro is being destroyed and along with that tree issues being compounded
     
  3. JD3000

    JD3000 Well-Known Member

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    Nah...just keep blasting every green thing at 6lbs or more of N per 1000. Throw in a bunch of phosphate for all those sloped sites in watersheds too.
     
  4. JD3000

    JD3000 Well-Known Member

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    Most deficiencies and limitations can be overcome with some bed work as Rope mentioned but many are induced by poor fert practices/nutrient antagonism, poor plant selection for the site, or soil degradation. Salt water with no specificity isn't going to help.

    Fun subject, my primary interest of self study usuallym
     
  5. RopeShield

    RopeShield Well-Known Member

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    Infuriating subject here.
    Especially the resources waste in soil injecting.
     
  6. JD3000

    JD3000 Well-Known Member

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    Well if you do it like the Big Companies and never test anything or disregard test results yeah it is infuriating.
     
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