Fate Lanyard prototype

moss

Well-Known Member
#1
My climbing style has evolved to a cinching anchor for my positioning lanyard, I still use it doubled but majority of the time cinched. Even on a spar a cinched lanyard can help a climber counter lean when you're running a saw on spurs. I've received enough grief cinching an alloy carabiner I started doing drawings of a device that would allow me to cinch in a way that doesn't violate industry norms.

Before I start attempting an expensive process of milling prototypes I decided to test using an F8 sewed to the end of a lanyard. Used it working yesterday, was pretty damn good, not as easy to cinch as a carabiner in certain situations where for example you're holding on with one arm while cinching a lanyard with the free hand, still workable for that scenario.

I've done intensive ground testing trying to shake it free when slacked, it doesn't come out. For additional security you can twist and cross the bight over the "horn" but it's more peace of mind than anything else, the bight doesn't come off the horn. A slightly more compact F8 with a round large opening would be best, looking to pick one up, the Black Diamond 8 is one I had laying around, works fine.







-AJ
 
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evo

Well-Known Member
#7
If you’re looking at fabbing something, what about three holes?
One small for the sewn splice,

One tight for the biner so it won’t rotage (slightly offset so it makes the large stick out proud)
And then one bigger one for the girth

This would allow for the larger one to second for tending, or other uses when configured in Ddrt. I don’t see why it couldn’t be used on a climbing line for a base tie, canopy anchor, or even a redirect
 

moss

Well-Known Member
#8
If you’re looking at fabbing something, what about three holes?
One small for the sewn splice,

One tight for the biner so it won’t rotage (slightly offset so it makes the large stick out proud)
And then one bigger one for the girth

This would allow for the larger one to second for tending, or other uses when configured in Ddrt. I don’t see why it couldn’t be used on a climbing line for a base tie, canopy anchor, or even a redirect
Excellent. I'm working on drawings for an optimized device, all ideas welcome. Main thing is keep it simple, quick on/off, secure.
-AJ
 

evo

Well-Known Member
#10
Excellent. I'm working on drawings for an optimized device, all ideas welcome. Main thing is keep it simple, quick on/off, secure.
-AJ
What about a little finger? You know the kind, one to trap the girth? I know you said it's bomber, and I believe you, but everything needs a proud finger to stick it to the man
 

SoftBankHawks

Well-Known Member
#11
That’s novel and I think that most lanyards serve just a couple of functions when actually there are loads of potential applications and ways to rig them. I’ve added a video showing my spur climbing hard/soft hand lanyard with a novel take on the working end.
For the cinch setting it can be trapped with a biner or a bight for remote release.

 

moss

Well-Known Member
#12
That’s novel and I think that most lanyards serve just a couple of functions when actually there are loads of potential applications and ways to rig them. I’ve added a video showing my spur climbing hard/soft hand lanyard with a novel take on the working end.
For the cinch setting it can be trapped with a biner or a bight for remote release.

I like it, thx Paul
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
#15
I on occasion will use my lanyard in SRT as well. Most times I am ok with choking a carabiner around the limb, but a quick way to avoid that is to clip it like this. It will not cross load the carabiner, in fact most times there is no weight on the carabiner at all due to the end of the lanyard being pinched into the tree, and it can be remote set and cinched.
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
#17
I on occasion will use my lanyard in SRT as well. Most times I am ok with choking a carabiner around the limb, but a quick way to avoid that is to clip it like this. It will not cross load the carabiner, in fact most times there is no weight on the carabiner at all due to the end of the lanyard being pinched into the tree, and it can be remote set and cinched.
I forgot to mention, when remote setting it you do have to flip it a little for it to cinch down. The rope on rope does not slide quite as nicely as a carabiner would.
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
#18
I just tried out something different for choking my lanyard that is easy to do, chokes easier than my last configuration and seems like a great option for not cross loading. Please let me know if I'm putting forces on my lanyard snap that I shouldn't. 20181104_142100.jpg

This also allows for a versatile lanyard setup. 20181104_141935.jpg 20181104_141958.jpg 20181104_142131.jpg
 
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#20
My climbing style has evolved to a cinching anchor for my positioning lanyard, I still use it doubled but majority of the time cinched. Even on a spar a cinched lanyard can help a climber counter lean when you're running a saw on spurs. I've received enough grief cinching an alloy carabiner I started doing drawings of a device that would allow me to cinch in a way that doesn't violate industry norms.

Before I start attempting an expensive process of milling prototypes I decided to test using an F8 sewed to the end of a lanyard. Used it working yesterday, was pretty damn good, not as easy to cinch as a carabiner in certain situations where for example you're holding on with one arm while cinching a lanyard with the free hand, still workable for that scenario.

I've done intensive ground testing trying to shake it free when slacked, it doesn't come out. For additional security you can twist and cross the bight over the "horn" but it's more peace of mind than anything else, the bight doesn't come off the horn. A slightly more compact F8 with a round large opening would be best, looking to pick one up, the Black Diamond 8 is one I had laying around, works fine.







-AJ
 
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