Experimental SRT climbing hitch

Discussion in 'Stationary Rope Technique-Half the rope, twice the' started by Wood_Dog, Oct 26, 2016.

  1. Wood_Dog

    Wood_Dog New Member

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    Before I go any further, I must say that this is experimental and use of this could be DANGEROUS!

    A friend of mine has showed me an experimental climbing hitch. He called it the "Synergy X experimental." He told me to look it up on youtube but honestly the videos are long and boring. I don't have time to watch every one of them. I have climbed on this (the one my friend showed me, not the original) and it works nicely, results may be different for everyone. My friend is excited about this and has more experience in climbing with it. Best results have been reported by him using HRC hitch cord. I will post links to videos demonstrating how to tie this, as well as original videos. The way I tied the hitch is not like how the guy ties it. If you decide to climb on this, remember it is experimental. Please note that my demonstration is different than whats in the original Synergy X hitch video. I have searched TreeBuzz forums for experimental hitches and came up dry. I thought it was a good idea to share this with the community here. I honestly will use this in the future. Feed back is appreciated, thanks TreeBuzz

    My Demonstration



    Original
     
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  2. Worthaug

    Worthaug Well-Known Member

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    Perty cool man


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. surveyor

    surveyor Well-Known Member

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    Nice. I have been experimenting a bit with a loop cord tied in a distel over a finger trap weave below, but I like the way your knot links keep the rope straight and reasonably compact when weighted. The Votex? would seem to be a good choice also for the climbing line. Is it easy to tend slack?
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2016
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  4. misfit

    misfit Member

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    Interesting. Those knots you are calling '"tie links," if I am hearing it correctly, are actually very commonly used knots in macrame, called a spiral knot. They are used to make spirals in decorative plant hangers and jewelry, etc.
     
  5. Brocky

    Brocky Well-Known Member

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    @SomethingWitty has already posted that video of his friend Steven's hitch in the Friction Hitch Questions thread in the Climber's section.
     
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  6. SomethingWitty

    SomethingWitty Well-Known Member

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    I think this may be someone I know. Nobody else is excited about this hitch yet :risas:
     
  7. SomethingWitty

    SomethingWitty Well-Known Member

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    It is! I didn't watch the video until after i replied.
     
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  8. Brocky

    Brocky Well-Known Member

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    @SomethingWitty have you tried it, tied this other way? If so, is there any difference?

    I have only tried the ordinal a couple of times and couldn't get it to grab. The bottom part wouldn't allow the wraps to squeeze, but couldn't hold by themselves, so it just slid down the rope.
     
  9. SomethingWitty

    SomethingWitty Well-Known Member

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    Once it is loaded to set it, it tends like the runner. Or at least smoother than I have ever gotten a wrench with a holding hitch to tend. I've also been calling the rope bars (tie links. Don't remember if that was what the guy in the original called them) the helix.

    I have never tried the original. The tie video that Eric just posted is what it looks like when I run it, though I admit I haven't tried it on all of my ropes. Stephen (bless his patient soul) was the one who waded through the original videos to find the crucial component (the helix) to take and make something that works out of it.
     
  10. Brocky

    Brocky Well-Known Member

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    I finally had successs in tying the Snynergy X hitch by using a softer cord and tying it correctly. I was grouping the knots of the bottom part together instead of spacing them on either side of the rope. I think a better descriptive term for this part should be a double helix, as it looks like a model of a DNA molecule.

    The only difference between yours and Eric's and the original by Stephen is how the top part is tied. Yours starts with a Distel and Stephen's starts with a Happy Hands hitch. The two are closely related as they are tied the same until the end where the eyes switch functions making them different hitches. I hope the picture below explains it better.
    image.jpeg
     
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  11. Dave82at

    Dave82at New Member

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    I was playing around with the Synergy X hitch as well and it tended to slip with the cord I used.
    The issue was that both the Happy Hands hitch and the Distel hitch stayed in their "open" position and slid down the climbing line. As soon as I would hold the Happy Hands hitch and push it up a tiny bit it would properly clamp down on the climbing rope.
    So I was thinking how to get it pushed up automatically so it would always clamp down on the climbing rope. First I added a spring to the climbing line between the Happy Hands hitch and the Helix. It worked fine first but the cord of the Happy Hands hitch after a while would slip over the spring.
    Looking at different hitch knots I found Cooper's Hitch. This hitch allowed me to install the spring on the climb line without having the hitch cord starting to go over the spring. It works wonder! Now the system would even clamp down even on the most slippery rope I had.
    I am still looking into trying different spring length and forces and machine a system which could get installed mid-line. Right now it still is just a very basic ugly but working home made system
     

    Attached Files:

  12. SomethingWitty

    SomethingWitty Well-Known Member

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    That's an interesting idea. I bet it works very well. What sort of cord is that? Does it wear well?
     
  13. Brocky

    Brocky Well-Known Member

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    Welcome @Dave82at, great first post and very helpful. I was having the same trouble getting the hitch to grab also. Your description was way better than mine above.

    I was trying to get it to work on 9mm HTP and finally had success using a marine type polyester double braid cord.

    Great idea of using a spring to push the wraps up.
     
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  14. Dave82at

    Dave82at New Member

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    I was using a Mammut 8mm Nylon cord. It wears ok but I really want to try the Teufelberger HRC.
    So far the spring setup is working great and never lets the coopers hitch slip. A slipping hitch is a absolute no-go for me - I want to be able to rely on my system and not have to worry that it would slip.
    Going forward, since reading Kevins Bingham blog, I will add another backup line with a petzl asap. In case anything happens to my climb line the asap will catch me.
     
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  15. castanea

    castanea Member

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    Hey this is Stephen, the other guy they keep referencing who has spent some time climbing on this.

    HRC is good along with any firmer rope. Sterling HTP, New England KMIII, Yale Kernmaster, Samson static line, All Gear Cherry Bomb type lines were good by memory. Stuff like the Yale 24 strands (Poison Ivy etc) are too soft. The sheath squished under the helix. I spent a little time with Sterling RIT's, Epicords, Beeline and did not get the same results. Beeline was close but as I recall I never got the super smooth release like HRC. But I did most of those tests on new rope with new hitch cord, not sure if breaking in would make a huge difference. I also think the lack of polyester in the HRC sheath is ideal, it won't glaze. If you grab the HRC as he does in the video above, hand on the wraps and palm manipulating the top of the helix, its super smooth. Never jams and tends really easily.

    @Dave82at If the top part is not engaging, tie it tighter and add another wrap. Try 5 solid wraps up there (6 before its arranged) and 5 repetitions of the helix. Tie the helix decently snug but don't overdo it. If that cordage is pure nylon I would be really worried about it glazing. I could definitely smell some of the hitch cords on moderate descents, the ones that have at least some polyester in the sheath.

    Its pretty quick to tie and would easily take less than a minute if you had spliced eyes. Fiddling with those takes more time than anything, and the bulk of pre-tied ends is annoying. And until you're good at tying it, or use pre tied ends, it tends to pull just enough slack out to be more leggy than youd like it.

    One bit of trivia I noticed was that about double, around 24" inches of the hitch cordage was engaging with the rope, compared to a standard hitch that you would use with a wrench or in double rope technique.

    I deactivated my facebook a long time ago and literally threw the password away, but I did a big write up in the "I Love SRT" group there a year or more ago. It could still be there. Probably worth searching 'synergy hitch' in there if you need more information. Maybe someone could even paste it into this thread, although everything has probably been covered by now.

    I'm hoping to see more people come up with variations on the helix part. Its dead simple but there have to be more interesting iterations of this principle.

    If anyone has any questions about this, ask here or via private message, I don't want to read about anyone falling on this.
     
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  16. Brocky

    Brocky Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone tried, or are using the above hitch?
     
  17. danhallen

    danhallen New Member

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    I used this hitch on a couple of pruning jobs this week. I used just under six feet(after termination knots) of 8mm beeline on 11mm sterling htp. I used a five wrap distel over five or six helix links. Five vs. six helix links did not seem to make a difference. I weigh about 185 lbs, but have not yet tried this hitch when carrying much extra weight. Tended very reliably after a small amount of dialing in. I did experience more setback than I would prefer, but I don't find this to be a huge issue when climbing srt. The top of the hitch is a little farther away than on my wrench setup. This was not an issue for me, but could be for others, perhaps depending on saddle/ rope bridge setup. I wrap my hand around the top of the helix and manipulate the distel with thumb and forefinger. I like the feel of it better than the rope wrench. I feel like hitch response is more intuitive and more natural feeling. I could imagine this replacing my rope wrench as my go to.
     
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  18. Brocky

    Brocky Well-Known Member

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    Welcome danhallen to the conversation, great first post. I recently got a wrench and hadn't realized that all the friction is on the hitch when you start to descend until the Wrench rotates from the neutral position to being engaged.
     
  19. Muggs

    Muggs Well-Known Member

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    I love the idea of this, but my main concern is using it with a floating bridge ring, like on a Sequoia. When I am turned real hard away from my rope with a 'normal' setup, I can barely reach the top of my hitch to adjust it. Seems to me like anything that puts the top of my hitch even further away from me is going to be a detriment. What are your thoughts?
     
  20. Brocky

    Brocky Well-Known Member

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    Good point, that could be a problem for some harness configurations. One work around would be to put a pulley, with a runner or short cord attached, on top of the hitch.
     

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