echo

viewscaping

New Member
How do you feel about echo chainsaws. I have a 365 and am looking at upgrading to a 372 for more balls. A friend loves echo - i had a top handle echo when I first started but now have a 200T which I love. Any insight?
 

rfwoodvt

Well-Known Member
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husky or stihl for pros that use a saw regularly. echo is for part timers.

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Oh how we taunt... /forum/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I'm only going to limit my discussion to the bucket saws as those are the only echos I've really used on the job.

I'm all for the Echo tophandles, the 30 and 34 cc models.

They have lasted as long or longer than all of my husky top handles and are available at just over half the cost of the Husky.

We do our own maint and service. Since echo parts readily available and many at the local big box for far less than anything from husky we're in good shape expense wise.

Some Echo shortcomings are: The older Echo top handles don't have dogs, just little useless nubs but the newer models have steel dogs like those found on the husky. And the handle could be a bit sturdier. This is a common weak point on my saws.

The husky performs much better out of the box but the husky tophandles have several bothersome quirks, not the least of which is a sparkplug cover that disappears within the first week of ownership. And, I have found that they are strong and powerful for about the first year or so then they just don't run well and become very easy to bog down. They also tend to be finicky about the weather and how they run. In the winter they tend to get carb freeze like the old high cfm automobile carbs did.

All I can say is try using a husky on a hot sweaty day, have that plug cover missing and just get it near your body while it is running and you'll get several thousand jolts you'll never forget! /forum/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

I've only occasionally used a stihl bucket saw but have never given it a fair trial to be able to comment.

But given the amount of time any of these saws lasts and the cost of each, my cost per year is ALWAYS much lower with the echo than the Huskies.

You aught to check out the new rear filter echo bucket saws...looks like they've improved on the design tremendously and still kept a great price!
 

jimmyq

New Member
not taunting at all. The only chainsaw I own is an echo top handle (330T) and for what I need its a great saw. I just think that the Stihl or Husqvarna saws will hold up better and perform stronger when moving into the larger categories. From what I have heard and discussed this seems to be the strong opinion of many pros.
 

Mange

New Member
I have: CS2900EVL, CS3900EVL, CS4500EVL, CS4610EVL, CS4510EVL, CS330EVL.

I use the 4600 sometimes, it is a noce saw, feels alot like HVA, but is easyer IMO to tinker with.
 

rfwoodvt

Well-Known Member
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not taunting at all. The only chainsaw I own is an echo top handle (330T) and for what I need its a great saw. I just think that the Stihl or Husqvarna saws will hold up better and perform stronger when moving into the larger categories.

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Absolutely! When it gets to the bigger saw I hesitate to look at the Echos for 2 reasons. first I have worked with a guy that uses Husky/Jonsered for carving and his saws last forever! In fact I did some work for him and bartered one of his 670's.. Darn thing is still going and it is at least 10 years old.

The second reason is that my only experience with an echo was while I was a structural firefighter. We bought an echo and it seemed the plastic they used in the construction of the saw was...well it didn't look or feel right and we were always afraid of it busting.

Again, tho, to be fair I've never given a 60 or 70 cc class echo a serious try. But the bigger the saws the closer the prices come to each other...

The big 3 Hus/Jons & Stihl have been at it for quite a long time. Can't beat longevity
 

Norm_Hall

Active Member
I would opt for the best servicing dealer. Around here, Husky parts can take along time to get (up to 3 weeks). Whereas Echo and Stihl are usually there the next day. Can't do much if your chainsaw is on the shelf awaiting repairs.
 

cory

Well-Known Member
I think the Echo climbing saw (3400 I think)has legendary reliablity but just doesn't have the power/chain speed to be productive enough in day in/day out treework.

The Husky 335 is ergonomically awesome, and when it's running properly is a cutting fool. But it is so unreliable that I won't use them anymore. I just traded in 4 of them which all had low hours (e.g. original chains on 2!) and only got $25 bucks apiece but I was happy to get rid of them...put the money toward an another 0200 which are pretty reliable, pretty ergomomic, and cut well.

It's amazing that Husqv., a company which makes such great larger saws (372 has got to be one of the best saws ever sold) makes such a piece of junk climbing saw...and its been that way for a few years now...they haven't fixed the longstanding 335 problems as far as I know.
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
As far as longevity is concerned, I have a bunch of 200T's that are 3 and 4 yrs. old and get worked everyday. I would say that is more than what I feel is necessary for me to buy them.
 

Roger_Barnett

Well-Known Member
I beg to differ with ya cory, tho I was not enamored with the 338. All of my 2nd/3rd generation 335's run well...the 2 Cali's are underwhelming, as the motor is just too large for the small carb and port sizes. But they start easily and cut with a 200T and have more torque. My 338, even modded as much as it is possible with the saw, is just OK. But, my 2nd generation 335, which has a dual port muffler, blows away my 200T with the screen out of the muffler, and is still fairly reliable starting and idling after 18 months of use.

Of my 3 first generation 335's, one was bone stock and would outcut a 020. The other two were problematic from the start, both starting, idling and oiler issues--all long solved. I had a 2nd generation 335 done by Walker's and it ran well for 18 months till it crapped out. The only problems now are the flimsy spark plug cover, but some tape every few months takes care of that issue, tho it would be better if they'd redesign it with a screw or two to hold it on. And sometimes the brakes go bad, tho mine are all working well of late.
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Roger, I have to come out there and work with you. Besides wanting to do some of the jobs you post and work in that beautiful scenery, I wanna see your 335's and 338's. That just doesn't seem to be possible to me at all.
 

cory

Well-Known Member
Sounds like you've had much better luck than me with those saws, Roger. I agree that when they work right, they are at least a match for the 0200s, but I just couldn't get mine to run right long term. My dealer doesn't like them either...he says he stocks them because some people ask for them...He sells both Husky and Stihl, and he prefers the 0200.

You reminded me about the chainbrakes...slightly annoying when they go off every time the saw is revved up!!!
 

richhoffman

Member
I just picked up a new Echo CS-360T Top Handle saw. The muffler is quite clooged with a catalytic converter and tight baffles. I removed all this and the saw cuts well. I didn't bother cutting with it stock...........didn't see the point too!!!
 

jimmyq

New Member
Rich, so what all did you remove? I have the 330T and figure I might as well yank out what isnt necessary. just the spark arrest or is there more screens than that I could/should remove?
 

rfwoodvt

Well-Known Member
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I just picked up a new Echo CS-360T Top Handle saw. The muffler is quite clooged with a catalytic converter and tight baffles. I removed all this and the saw cuts well. I didn't bother cutting with it stock...........didn't see the point too!!!

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Been looking for a 360T to check out but none are around here yet.

Whats your initial assessment Rich?
 

richhoffman

Member
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Rich, so what all did you remove? I have the 330T and figure I might as well yank out what isnt necessary. just the spark arrest or is there more screens than that I could/should remove?

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There is a spiral foil type catalytic converter housed in a steel tube ( I should have taken pics ). I cut 3 sides of the muffler on a band saw and spread the muffler open enough to remove the steel baffle tube the holds the converter. I cut the sides of the tube to remove the converter and open up the tube also. the tube acts as a baffle and is restrictive also, The tube has to be used as it keeps the muffler from collapsing when the nuts are tightened down. I also opened up te outlet hole about 100%. I then cleaned/deburred all the cut edges and tack welded the tube inside the muffler. I closed the muffler back up and made sure the mufflers studs passed thru and welded the muffler back up. It was well worth it. The only drawback is needing a mig welder to do it!


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Been looking for a 360T to check out but none are around here yet.

Whats your initial assessment Rich?

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Initial assessment is good! Could be the saw to have after the 020T/200T.
 

Steve_Hansen

New Member
I bought the little top handle echo saw about two years ago (thought I couldn't afford a 200T). The dang thing never would run correctly, it would either idle so fast that the chain was always moving or it would die at idle. Plus it never had much power. I took it back 6 times in one month. I didn't buy it from a saw shop it was a large farmer co-op and I finally got to talk to the manager one day and he asked me what it would take to make me happy on the deal and I said "take the saw back and credit my account". I have a echo pole chainsaw that my father gave me and it works pretty good. Other than that I'm a stihl guy and am hooked now. Buying that echo was a big waste of time.
 

rfwoodvt

Well-Known Member
First thing I did with all my ECHO Tophandle saws was pull the carb adjustment limiters off. then I adjusted the carb to idle just a hair rich and set the high speed so at WOT it just start to get that "4-cycle" sound.

I need to change or adjust the carb with major changes in the weather. This is someting I've had to do with all of the smaller saws using the tillotson or walbro carbs. Including the 334/335/338 huskies.

Its something I do every day when I touch up the chains before starting work. I'll fire them up and see how they run. Adjusting as necessary. Sometimes, like in summer, I'll go weeks without needing an adjustment. But right now...warm and wet one day, bitter cold the next...its a daily adjustment.
 
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