Do u have a better way to carry ur silky when u wear ur sour? This is how I do it

erwin

Active Member
I know I just have to strap it only leg when I’m not wearing spurs. But sometimes I wish I have a handsaw with my on spurs. This is how I do it and it worked perfectly with the buck Velcro pads. It still work when I changed to the big buck pads, just the angle is a little off. Any other ideas?41C8F689-664C-44BC-8602-E2489A1C24A4.jpeg
 

dsptech

Well-Known Member
I use velcro straps through the scabbard loops and around my leg.
I then put on my spurs with the Big Buck style pads.
I keep the saw on my left leg with the handle pointing forward.
When I wore it on my right leg it tended to get caught up behind my knee.

59422
 

Tony

Well-Known Member
Just get a sawpod.

I have had mine for well over 15 years. I get new velcro straps about once a year. Fits any and every handsaw.

What Tom didn’t allude to is the standard requires a handsaw when ever rigging, climbing or lift. For me it’s no so much a “just in case,” but more of feeling silly using my chainsaw on that few mm branch thats gotta go because it’s poking me in the face!

Hand saw is also often how I finish tricky cuts.

Tony
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
Don't get me wrong, I know the usefulness of having a hand saw. It just doesn't seem like a safety factor to me, therefore should not be required by z133. But I am open to learning new things if someone can point out why it should be required other than for convenience.
 

climbstihl

Well-Known Member
Don't get me wrong, I know the usefulness of having a hand saw. It just doesn't seem like a safety factor to me, therefore should not be required by z133. But I am open to learning new things if someone can point out why it should be required other than for convenience.
I could see it being required when climbing with a chainsaw, incase that gets stuck, but it's still not relevant to safety.
 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
I always think of that last back cut when you run out of gas. How far did you get thru the wood, maybe you can't push it over? Does your ground team need to come under a wobbly top that might get blown over by the wind to fill you up?
I know I have made plenty of cuts with a handsaw because I wanted to be safer than holding a powersaw when the reaction forces start.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
are you familiar with the Z133? @Ent Lots more than just PPE. It has to do with safe work practices.

I just re-read my comment and see that I should edit... what I should have written is:

...was A reason...not the reason

There have already been a few reasons to have a handsaw shared in this thread.

I can't see any good reason not to have a handsaw all of the time...mine goes with me on cat rescues.
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
I always think of that last back cut when you run out of gas. How far did you get thru the wood, maybe you can't push it over? Does your ground team need to come under a wobbly top that might get blown over by the wind to fill you up?
I know I have made plenty of cuts with a handsaw because I wanted to be safer than holding a powersaw when the reaction forces start.
The running out of gas thing I agree with. The reaction forces thing not so much. I think if you are doing something that causes a reaction force so great that you can't safely have a chainsaw in your hand, there is a better way to do it. But everybody's style is different. Everybody's comfortable is different. I'm not saying your wrong.
 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
The running out of gas thing I agree with. The reaction forces thing not so much. I think if you are doing something that causes a reaction force so great that you can't safely have a chainsaw in your hand, there is a better way to do it. But everybody's style is different. Everybody's comfortable is different. I'm not saying your wrong.
You are right and I usually am fine holding the saw when things go ka-sproing. A lot of the times I switch to the handsaw to finish cuts b/c I want to hold on to the skinny thing I'm on or my rope or push or pull. We have a 2hands policy for chainsaw cuts and I am usually good at making myself follow it.
It's not like flailing around a silky is safer than a ms200
 

Ent

Member
are you familiar with the Z133? @Ent Lots more than just PPE. It has to do with safe work practices.

I just re-read my comment and see that I should edit... what I should have written is:

...was A reason...not the reason

There have already been a few reasons to have a handsaw shared in this thread.

I can't see any good reason not to have a handsaw all of the time...mine goes with me on cat rescues.
Yes Tom, I have, and have read Z133. I don't see any of these reasons as enough, personally, to clog up space on my harness or figure out some clumsy way to attach it over my spurs when I'm doing a take down. I won't get into the reasons I think so. If you want to carry a handsaw on your cat rescues and big removals, feel free. It's none of my business, nor do I care really. The guy asked how to carry his handsaw and I replied. Feel free to lecture others.
 
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