Dead oaks

baumeister

Active Member
I am removing some dead oaks in a month with a crane. I am going to have to ride the ball and am a bit nervous. Have some crane experience over the past 7 years maybe used them a handful of times but never rode the ball. I would like to know if there are books, videos, and pics out there I can bone up on. My nerves are twofold.

1. I have not risen the ball and am not sure how I would tie in.
2. I am not sure how long the trees have been dead. ( 1 to 5 years possibly ) black and red oaks died of oak wilt most likely but not confirmed. They are in a very tough spot on a steep dune.
 

craneguy1

Well-Known Member
There are many threads on here regarding riding the block... tying into the block i believe is the title of one of them...you can also order the best management practices for crane operations manual from tcia.
 

deevo

Well-Known Member

Get a good friction saver this one I've been using the last 2 years is from American Arborist supply in PA I got it at the crane course. Then out your lanyard through the hook as a backup until you get where you need to be.


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Z'sTrees

Well-Known Member
Never really understood the lanyard thru the hook thing unless you're cutting while tied in to the crane.
I made a friction saver with two steel rings that I triple-fisherman'd with some tritech. Super tough and maybe cost $30 to make. The knots actually keep the ring out off the ball a little. Before that I just used two shackles, tightened with pliers.
Sometimes on really dead trees you can slash out the tops so you can sling the pick in stronger wood and still have the piece be balanced right without having to go too big on the bottom.
 

deevo

Well-Known Member
Never really understood the lanyard thru the hook thing unless you're cutting while tied in to the crane.
I made a friction saver with two steel rings that I triple-fisherman'd with some tritech. Super tough and maybe cost $30 to make. The knots actually keep the ring out off the ball a little. Before that I just used two shackles, tightened with pliers.
Sometimes on really dead trees you can slash out the tops so you can sling the pick in stronger wood and still have the piece be balanced right without having to go too big on the bottom.
It's a second tie in while being hoisted and has been best practise for the last 2 or more years. Better have a rated and stamped friction saver if OSHA ever shows up or heaven forbid something happened
 

Z'sTrees

Well-Known Member
Good point on the friction saver.
It's funny we can climb all over a tree with unknown/unrated attachment points but when we tie into a crane that's good for thousands and thousands of pounds the rules change.
 
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