Cranes, trees and common usage locations

Mangoes

Well-Known Member
An interesting though occured to me.

My sense is; from the pics and videos posted, that very few are employing cranes in the city environments. Generally i observe cranes employed by Arbos in suburban areas with wider streets and more utilities underground.

Any thoughts or experience on downtown usage where you may have 15-20 communication wires under a single tree, plus all the hydro service on the road?

Seems to me that a Kato MR130 would be awesome in these areas, however being albe to land the picks would still be onerous.

I know Bigwood has tons of experience in these types of areas. And my perception (generated by the practices of one of TO's contractors) is that trees in these areas are better brushed out via climber/bucket then the only the wood is picked as it is easier to land.
 

dylanclimbs

Member
Generally in that situation, it is exactly as you describe. Brush it out by climbing or lift truck, then pick the wood. I would think a knuckle boom might be more maneuverable in these situations, however. Sometimes a power pole saw is a great way to help one 'fit' the pick.
 

MarquisTree

Member
We use cranes in tight urban situations regularly. I have found making videos of city work to be much more difficult. Often times your picking over buildings and many obstacles blocking good camera angles. Just a thought why there may be less videos of that type of work out there.
I have seen people brushing out trees then using a crane to pick out just the wood , we rarely ever do that, seems like a waste of time in most situations
 

Norm_Hall

Active Member
I've done some tree removals in the city of Chicago using 70, 150 and 200 ton cranes. A total nightmare. The crane would have to stay in the street. So, in order to block the street, you need a permit from the city. Then, you had to have an "Emergency back-up plan" in case Fire/Rescue needed to get onto the stree you have blocked off.
Most of the time it was a bigger crane to get the reach. Eight foot X 8' pads were required on any crane 70 ton or larger. Had to maintain the 10' clearance from energized lines.
The biggest concern was cutting the brush small enough to land in the street surrounded by parkway trees.
 

BigWood

Active Member
Comm. lines aren't normally a problem. Pole pruner takes care of them, as Rogers and Bell put them back up FREE!
 

cory

Well-Known Member
Wow, Classic, that is a radical crane, never seen one like that, must be the cat's azz on the right job, super fast set up too. Nice!
 

marlinspiker

Well-Known Member
I agree with Norm. We have had crane jobs in the city and it takes months of planning to get anything going. Sometimes its more cost effective to go manual even if it means cutting the brush into tiny pieces and going through someones house.

attached is a picture of a recent job in philly. We were able to get a 35 ton crane snuck in the alley. We were competing against another company that wanted to use a 60 ton crane from the main street and we were able to beat their price.
 

Norm_Hall

Active Member
[ QUOTE ]
We use our mini crane in the downtown area all the time, it's 7'10" wide, 53' of boom, rated at 5 ton and can carry 2 ton while traveling.
http://treedoctor.ca/photogallery2.html
These pictures are from the first job we used it on, doesn't look like a difficult job but there was only about 20' between the house and the three phase power line.

[/ QUOTE ]

How much does the machine weigh?
 

Jman

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
approximately 30% of our work sites look just like that.

(big ginkgo?)

[/ QUOTE ]

Actually that was just a street tree. The tree we removed was a Siberian elm (I'm pretty sure that's what it was, elm of some type) I got one or two photos on my crappy cell phone I could post but I'm sure mike has a few more of the actual stem. tight tight tight.
 

classictruckman

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
We use our mini crane in the downtown area all the time, it's 7'10" wide, 53' of boom, rated at 5 ton and can carry 2 ton while traveling.
http://treedoctor.ca/photogallery2.html
These pictures are from the first job we used it on, doesn't look like a difficult job but there was only about 20' between the house and the three phase power line.

[/ QUOTE ]

How much does the machine weigh?

[/ QUOTE ]

slightly more than 10 ton.
 

welltree

Active Member
Come on Kevin you know there are lots of trees coming down everyday in your area with cranes,We generally don't brush out just have to use right equipment and right operator.Rear mount buckets are awesome on crane removals gives you way more options on set up.And if tight on space climber and crane.I think big wood might have seen it done a few times,lol
 

BigWood

Active Member
Yeh, once or twice! Only time trees get brushed out separately is due to contractual obligations or municipal stupidity. Normally, if the crane will go up, there's somewhere to put the brush down.
 

BigWood

Active Member
Funny you should mention the BO irritation factor. Thursday mine had to climb and remove a 70foot full spruce and I showed up just in time to pick up the last 15 foot log. He can't figure out what he did wrong, I haven't either but I'm sure there's something he isn't telling me about.
 

hl_tree

Member
I'm normally using cranes to make up for labor in terrible locations. Rather than carry logs up 10+ stairs just get the crane in. A few years ago I put together a trailer which goes to the site behind the truck, it carries 40 assorted pieces of cribbing, from 6x6 - 8x8. I think so far the worst I've ever had was 30 pieces to get the machine level. I have a variety of challenges, very rarely does everything work out. Either we have a terrible spot to put the crane in, or we have a terrible spot to put stuff down in, sometimes both, between the wires, and the grades, it's rarely fun.
 

Mangoes

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Come on Kevin you know there are lots of trees coming down everyday in your area with cranes,We generally don't brush out just have to use right equipment and right operator.Rear mount buckets are awesome on crane removals gives you way more options on set up.And if tight on space climber and crane.I think big wood might have seen it done a few times,lol

[/ QUOTE ]

Of course perception is always less accurate the further you are from the source. I would agree WT there are lots of trees being removed. Proof of this would be that the contractor has 5-7 boom trucks about near every day. My question was more as a residential only contractor. I don't do any tree removals within the municipal road allowance. So my inquiry might be better defined to non- municipal and/or back yard projects.
 
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