crane work

Fairfield

Well-Known Member
Was looking to see if any of you have used SRT when doing crane work? Any tips or tricks to share? I used SRT on my last crane removal, it did go smoothly. Just had to keep reminding myself of what I was doing.
 

chris_girard

Well-Known Member
Crane work is the one thing that I don't use SRT on. Haven't found an efficient way to do it yet.

I'm interested to hear about your setup. What are you using and how?
 

Fairfield

Well-Known Member
I would say I am in the testing out stages also.... I will put a vid or some pics of my setup on and see what you think. I would say at this point my setup is more of a hybrd of SRT and Dbrt. I will put something together this week for show.
 

Muggs

Well-Known Member
I am always intrigued by the descriptions of tying into the ball on crane work in the States. The tales of being lifted into the tree over and over and then zipping down after one cut, man does that sound fun, a little repetitive, but fun. Here in Canada we can't do that. We just pick one lead to tie into like regular tree work and then remove the rest of the tree with the crane from the top down. Then we go back to the t.i.p at the end, hook it up and cut it somewhere down the spar. SRT works mint for this. Like I say, its just like normal tree work for us except we can take huge chunks and they go up instead of down. For some reason we can't tie into a crane, don't ask me why, its obviously a bomber anchor point, way safer than tying into a tree. Ah, the nanny state, useless regulation to protect us from ourselves.
 

jomoco

Active Member
I use the same method in large crane removals Muggs, but the difference is that I get an elevator ride to my optimum TIP, saving me considerable energy.

One of the more subtle drawbacks of free crane rides to your TIP is not getting a good look at the trees wood structure for possible faults, cracks and other factors affecting the tree's integrity you intend to tie into and shake about.

I like to have the CO drop the ball down the middle of the tree's structure to its base, then ride up from there doing an inspection of the wood up to my optimum TIP.

Wide trees need to be removed in a balanced manner as well, to assure it doesn't get subjected to novel forces unknown to it before. In other words a little off oneside, then a little off the other, in a balanced manner.

Crane use has its own subtle dangers for sure, and they can be quite lethal unless precautions are taken.

Personally I think the ANSI Z Committee has done a fantastic job lately at making crane assisted removals much safer and productive for the working arborist.

This is best illustrated by the sections that allow the climber to remain tied into the crane while taking small picks from a tree too hollow and unstable to tie into at all, even four foot up the base!

And yes, those trees exist, and someone has to remove them one way or another. I suspect more than a few EAB kill ash trees fit that category of dangerous removals. And thanks to the guys on the Committee, we have an ANSI approved means of dealing with them in relative safety.

jomoco
 

deevo

Well-Known Member
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I am always intrigued by the descriptions of tying into the ball on crane work in the States. The tales of being lifted into the tree over and over and then zipping down after one cut, man does that sound fun, a little repetitive, but fun. Here in Canada we can't do that. We just pick one lead to tie into like regular tree work and then remove the rest of the tree with the crane from the top down. Then we go back to the t.i.p at the end, hook it up and cut it somewhere down the spar. SRT works mint for this. Like I say, its just like normal tree work for us except we can take huge chunks and they go up instead of down. For some reason we can't tie into a crane, don't ask me why, its obviously a bomber anchor point, way safer than tying into a tree. Ah, the nanny state, useless regulation to protect us from ourselves.

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We do it as do a lot of other companies around here inlcuding some of the big ones won't name them. If done the correct way our crane op has no problem letting us ride the ball. He is an amazing operator 60 ton grove he rolls in!i haven't done SRT for crane work though.
 

deevo

Well-Known Member
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Very true jomoco.

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Second that! I still want to go the to crane workshop this year if time allows to get some better training and persepectives. We do 10-20 crane removals a year, mostly with the same Op
 
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