Crane slings

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
Are you secret handshaking this setup...or just straight choking both sides of the spar/chain individually?

I like the looks and thought behind this system...make it easy and idiot proof.

Grrrr, and I just bought 2 endless eye slings last night at Gap Arborist (to finally get away from using eye to eye slings on trunk wood)
The pics that dropped were secret handshake. Gotta tell you, I haven't used it since. Each leg does its thing.
 

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
What's "secret handshaking"?
Hard to explain but Ill try. The slings are basically pulling against each other in tandem. sorta like a girth using 2 slings. It allows you to preset the joining of 2 slings and has it partially pre rigged so you don't have to chase slings around a huge trunk twice. You then take the other leg of the pair and hook it to the hook. A pulls on b and b on a and they keep each other tight working together as one choker Maybe somebody has a pic? @deevo @TheCraneManInc
 

deevo

Well-Known Member
Hard to explain but Ill try. The slings are basically pulling against each other in tandem. sorta like a girth using 2 slings. It allows you to preset the joining of 2 slings and has it partially pre rigged so you don't have to chase slings around a huge trunk twice. You then take the other leg of the pair and hook it to the hook. A pulls on b and b on a and they keep each other tight working together as one choker Maybe somebody has a pic? @deevo @TheCraneManInc
I looked and don’t have one Steve, I don’t really like my guys using that either.
 

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
I don't wanna say it was the secret handshake. There are some real pros who use it every day and have never had an issue. I know of 2 of us who have. I choose to not use it based on personal choice. I will say do not use it with flat slings. Don't its not gonna hold.
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Here's my take on the sling options. I lean towards the Wesspur Quantum X Crane man slings and here is why. Although I like Mark's slings, there are a few issues with them. After repeated use they have to be unwhipped, milked, and re whipped again because the core fibers lump up under load. Mine look like the core is made of golf balls. They are also super stiff out of the box. They need to get a few hard days of work before you can get them malleable. Don't get me wrong, I still use them and have for a few years. They work better for me depending on the set up because they are shorter than the Quantum X. I do personally prefer to use the QX whenever possible because of the length, soft hand, weights in the tail, and mine are spliced onto a ring so there is no issue with angles on the hook. The beauty of the 2 is I can choose what the best is for the current application. I'm not poo-pooing Mark's slings. I just feel like the others are superior, albeit his are more wallet friendly. My major gripe is the lumps in the core. I don't have time to go through the process to fix that frequently.

So my initial post was written when I really didn't have time to write an indepth review. I hope this will serve the OP a little better with some pros/cons instead of my original post that basically said absolutely nothing. @Mark Chisholm better?
No problem from where I stand. The first time I had that happen was using the same material as a rigging line to support a whole tree. I got nervous and called NE Ropes and they said to send a hank. They tested and it had no strength loss, just a weird look.
 

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
Nice Guy Dave says the sling needs to be unwhipped, milked heavily under tension and re whipped. I just haven't had time to do it. It's really quite lumpy.
No problem from where I stand. The first time I had that happen was using the same material as a rigging line to support a whole tree. I got nervous and called NE Ropes and they said to send a hank. They tested and it had no strength loss, just a weird look.
 

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
I didn't have time so far this week to mess with pics. Just tough when you are on someone elses dime. I should be able to get something tomorrow.
 

climbhightree

Well-Known Member
OK I'm sure Steve will get actual pictures but I threw this together to give the general idea. Obviously in actual operation the purple straps would be round slings, and carabiners would be properly installed steel shackles

20181128_171427.jpg

 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Nice Guy Dave says the sling needs to be unwhipped, milked heavily under tension and re whipped. I just haven't had time to do it. It's really quite lumpy.
I personally don't like hollowbraid slings since the grab, pick, get stuck on bark and tend to be slippery to the touch which makes them cinch really aggressively. That makes them harder to untie than a more round, firmer material.
 

allmark

Well-Known Member
I don’t see how the chart applies to crane slings, since each sling is terminated at the branch and at the hook. There is no multiplication of force by pulling midline. I can see how it would relate to a branch, except there is always a central line tied straight downward, negating the forces against branch slings, which then become mostly stabilizers. That may be the thought behind the team’s practice, as they always emphasized the need for the central anchor. Sure, there is some load on the branches, meaning load on the hook- not denying that, but it is considerably less than it would be without a center, vertical leg.
There is multiplication of the force to the sling as well.
if the force on the load at the attachment point is 1.25x then the sling will have to hold that 1.25 x as well as the hook.
 
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