Climbing/PPE Gear for Small Bodies

Nish

Well-Known Member
I'm looking for advice on the best climbing gear for a compact female climber. We particularly need help on the items for which fit is critical: helmet, harness, gloves, footwear, chainsaw protective pants.... The helmet should be compatible with the Sena system. It would all be for daily, professional use.
 
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Timber1972

Member
I will be watching this closely too as I just hired a young woman and we have the same issues. She did get the waist sewed in 4 places to get her chainsaw paints to fit with doctored up suspenders but I want to get something better for her. I know clogger makes some women's chainsaw pants but we need something heavier for our 5 months of winter.

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CanadianStan

Well-Known Member
How tall are you? Petite or more muscular build ?

The one thing I have to say is that Clogger will custom tailor a pair of chainsaw pants to your dimensions for a 10% extra

I’ve always found that gloves tend to run small instead of big. Atlas, Showa, etc should cover you

Hard hats is a tough one. Measure your head circumference and compare it to the specs of common climbing helmets

Footwear : are you looking for hiking boots for climbing ? For chainsaw proof, high arch boots for spur climbing ?
 

Timber1972

Member
She will need at least steel toe with chainsaw protection for when she starts climbing. We specialize in pruning so something with a soft sole is crucial. And getting them with enough insulation for our winter work at -20 to -30 C would be nice.

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CanadianStan

Well-Known Member
She will need at least steel toe with chainsaw protection for when she starts climbing. We specialize in pruning so something with a soft sole is crucial. And getting them with enough insulation for our winter work at -20 to -30 C would be nice.

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I’ve used my Zermatts down to about -10c with wool socks and they’ve been lovely. Waterproof, well insulated ... and they come in a US 7. That might work for you (and OP)
 

SRS

New Member
I'm the small new climber mentioned in the initial post-- 5'1" and around 120lbs. I'm only a size 6 in boots, but I've found that boots are the least difficult to find. Finding small enough helmets and gloves (for doing ground work in the past) is often difficult, and I'm anticipating that finding a good harness may also be a challenge.
 

RyanCafferky

Well-Known Member
Keep your eyes peeled for a Petzl Navajo Size 0 harness. It doesn’t have a bridge but it is a great saddle and that size was very small. I have one that I have put on very small women and children with good results. It is an old model so it will be very difficult to find. Another good option would be talking with New Tribe. Because they sew all of their harnesses in house, they could probably work with you to come up with a good option size wise for you.
 

TimBr

Well-Known Member
She will need at least steel toe with chainsaw protection for when she starts climbing. We specialize in pruning so something with a soft sole is crucial. And getting them with enough insulation for our winter work at -20 to -30 C would be nice.

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This might be off topic, but I would be very interested in reading a thread started by you, @Timber1972, or @CanadianStan or @deevo or @Pelorus that details how you folks manage to stay warm in -30 Celsius temperatures, which is equivalent to -22 degrees Fahrenheit. Clothing used, methods used, etc. Thanks in advance to anyone that chooses to start such a thread.

Tim
 

deevo

Well-Known Member
This might be off topic, but I would be very interested in reading a thread started by you, @Timber1972, or @CanadianStan or @deevo or @Pelorus that details how you folks manage to stay warm in -30 Celsius temperatures, which is equivalent to -22 degrees Fahrenheit. Clothing used, methods used, etc. Thanks in advance to anyone that chooses to start such a thread.

Tim
We don’t work in anything below -12 if I can help it! Unless it’s an insurance job. Too hard on the trucks hydraulics and us!
 
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