Carbon engineered fuel

surveyor

Well-Known Member
#1
I have a friend who is in the petrochemical industry, who lives in Singapore, who has shared this video on facebook. This seems like a good idea to me. especially if a modular unit could be installed at each gas station, thereby eliminating, or at least reducing, the need for massive refineries subject to disruption, and also eliminating or reducing the need to burn fuel in order to deliver the fuel to each station.


 

ATH

Well-Known Member
#5
I have seen other proposals to capture atmospheric carbon called "artificial leaf". Here is one such example:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/liquid-fuels-from-sunshine/

There are even ways to make hydrocarbon fuel (in addition to ethanol) from wood. I heard a guy from the USFS research lab in Madison talking about this 11 years ago... By his estimates, the difference between the wood that is available (so, not counting what is grown in National Parks, for example) and that which is harvested could supply 1/3 of the Nation's fuel needs. Here is a quick example of liquid from wood: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...oil-in-two-simple-steps-idUSTRE79H6SL20111018 (wouldn't it be nice if we could sell our waste!?!)

In their simplest form, the OP and these 2 are the same thing...using the energy of the sun to drive a system that pulls carbon (as CO2) out of the air - then combines that C with H to make hydrocarbons.

When I searched the artificial leaf term, also found an MIT article (from 2011) describing a device that splits water into Hydrogen and Oxygen. That would certainly lead to cleaner fuels, but storage would be more difficult and usage would require drastic changes in our current engine technologies... http://news.mit.edu/2011/artificial-leaf-0930

I guess I might call myself skeptical for the short term, but I don't know of a theoretical reason why these kinds of technologies wouldn't work with more brain power pushing them along over the decades.
 
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