Can someone please identify this possible fungus?

Discussion in 'Bugs and Crud' started by Brian Pottieger, Nov 1, 2017.

  1. Brian Pottieger

    Brian Pottieger New Member

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    Whatever this is has spread from the trunk throughout all of the branches. It's about a 65 ft oak in a center island of a community we currently maintain. While I have my arborist cert....it's one thing to pass a test, it's impossible to know everything in a six month period. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you.
     

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  2. TCtreeswinger

    TCtreeswinger Well-Known Member

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    You're going to need a Lot more detailed pictures. Even then it won't be a guarantee. Looks like a Sapwood fungi. Pluck a few off and send it in for testing your extension should have treatment protocol once diagnosed if there is anything you can do.
     
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  3. Brian Pottieger

    Brian Pottieger New Member

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    Thanks for your reply and my apologies for not thanking you sooner. I'll definitely take your advice and see where to go from there. Thanks again.
     
  4. KTSmith

    KTSmith Well-Known Member

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    TC is right of course, some sharp, crisp, closeups of both upper and lower surfaces would help. Critical points are: Are the pores on the underside so small that they are not visible with the naked eye? Can you see them with a handlens? Is the upper surface covered with dense or sparse hairs? Also would likely need a handlens to see the latter.

    I will, however, throw caution to the winds and suggest that the OP start with Stereum complicatum. Easy call. Might not be correct, but if I needed to know the fungus name, I'd start there. This is one we commonly see on the sapwood of broadleaved trees, both living and on stumps and wood in ground contact.

    I suspect, however that Brian is more interested in what it means rather than on the current and soon-to-be current revisions of that genus. TC is right, this is a sapwood rotter. Not a super pathogen, but it does indicate dead tissue beneath the fruiting bodies, which are pretty extensive.
     
  5. Brian Pottieger

    Brian Pottieger New Member

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    Thank you guys and my apologies for not getting back to this thread sooner. I have taken this to our local extension in Charleston and they are going to send it to the lab for testing. It really blows being a "newbie" in this business because there's so much to learn. I wish I would've started this 20 years ago!! Thanks again.
     
  6. TCtreeswinger

    TCtreeswinger Well-Known Member

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    Gotta start somewhere!
     
  7. Brian Pottieger

    Brian Pottieger New Member

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    So very true!
     

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