Buttcatch log lowering video

Oxman

Member
Here's a doug fir in tight quarters being dismantled with a portawrap and pulley to lower the fat ol logs. 14 minute film clip with a little slo-mo when one of the logs is cut loose.

Buttcatch

Here's a shot in the slo mo sequence.

 

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jomoco

Active Member
Nice work Mike.

Methodical and conservative with no mistakes.

Except that big saw and long bar!

jomoco
 

Bixler

Well-Known Member
Your a soldier Ox, that saw looks like a toy. Love the old school video, thanks for sharing.
 

theXman

Well-Known Member
maybe the video isn't showing things accurately, but looks like there was some rope running that could have/should have been happening, especially in the beginning.

I know it was 2002 but we were all running ropes way before then.

I just thought on that first log, it looked jaring, nasty, shockloading.

I didn't see it all, maybe later.

I did see the part where the house was near and you showed no good drop zone, except that truck bed, where you could have had another truck use a drifting speedline to guide the lowered peices into the bed instead of guys pulling.

yeah, I know, could have, should have... bla bla bla. Oh well, it's a forum for discussing things.

Thanks for sharing the video.
 

Rickytree

New Member
Only used a porty a few times and noticed that the rope seemed to pinch in the curved outside part or maybe pinched is the wrong word. Just didn't like how it grabbed.
 

TC

Well-Known Member
what's this video about?

it's really weird, it's like a 'how not to' guide to lowering vertical sections of timber from a spar.
 

TreeCo

Well-Known Member
Looked good to me Ox.

Good to see you hanging out. That's an interesting collection of videos you've got there at UTube.
 

theXman

Well-Known Member
I hate to say it, but yeah, keeping in mind that new climbers might not know what they are looking at; this is NOT how to safely lower logs.

Large diameter rope and rope stretch is the only thing that kept a break from happening. That rope is severely compromised after that job. No roping skills used on the half of the video that I watched.
 

jomoco

Active Member
So you've never had to snub off a log and not let it run to avoid a target X?

Funny, I've had to do just that lots of times!

That's what big bull lines and blocks are for at times!

Yes letting it run to a soft sop is very nice each time there's room for it.

But there always comes a time when letting your load run is not an option.

jomoco
 

theXman

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Looked good to me Ox.

Good to see you hanging out. That's an interesting collection of videos you've got there at UTube.

[/ QUOTE ]

Well, this is indeed an interesting thread to see who's skills stayed back in the mid 1980's and did not advance over the years.

You guys can't just keep doing stuff the same way you did long ago. Not when there is so much more known these days. So much information shared on how to advance!

Reminds me of a tree company just a mile away from me. They almost never use a block. They use crotches and have been doing this for maybe 30 years now. They do trunk wraps. They lock the rope off and there is almost no run except for the slack that gets pulled out and the rope stretch.

A year or two ago, they totalled their bucket truck. A 5/8" bull rope, run through a crotch of course, broke when they cut a limb. The rope snapped and the limb fell on the cab of the truck and destroyed it.

They can't understand how it happened, in his words, "we've done it that way a 1000 times before and the limb wasn't excessively big. So, we fixed the problem, today I went a bought a bigger rope".
 

jomoco

Active Member
But that's the point I'm driving at!

Do you guys really put yourselves as climbers into a position where if your rope man screws up, you're totally screwed?

Or do you go conservative enough that you're covered whether he screws up or not?

What do you do without an experienced roper, go home?

jomoco
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
Ox was in a stable position for that first piece... groundie coulda, shoulda, woulda, but either way, its nice to be stable and set for the ride, be it big or small... Noticed he went with smaller pieces after that... IMO too small, but that's just me...

There were a lot of other issues besides the groundie. I'll let it go at that..
 
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