Bulge On Cherrybark Oak

Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
#46
Haglof is a good brand; I've got 2--but rarely use them! JD's got the right idea.

I'll be up there in September. I did some work for the Great Falls folks a while ago; remember?

It sounds like both trees can be pruned and kept low risk indefinitely. Focus on the load, not the "defects". http://www.historictreecare.com/wp-...ve-Dendro-The-Case-of-the-Deathly-Hollows.pdf
I seldom use mine either, but when a client has a tree that is in quite poor shape or questionable safe condition, it's often answered many questions that would otherwise be invisible. This device has saved many trees from being cut down. Sadly it has proven that many were far too dangerous to remain standing.
 

Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
#48
I seldom use mine either, but when a client has a tree that is in quite poor shape or questionable safe condition, it's often answered many questions that would otherwise be invisible. This device has saved many trees from being cut down. Sadly it has proven that many were far too dangerous to remain standing.
And Guy that was trolling! @guymayor
 
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ATH

Well-Known Member
#49
Have somebody with experience in tree risk assessment look at it with you. Sounds like you have an offer from Guy. A few hundred so you can feel confident in purchasing .35 acres or a few hundred to save several thousand if they do need to come down. Sounds like a good investment either way.
 

guymayor

Well-Known Member
#50
How does one calculate via that a tree is "far too dangerous to remain standing"?

That sounds oxymoronic--unless the tree is laying down, it is able to remain standing. This "Keep or Kill" paradigm is hard to understand. Who do we think we are? "What are reasonable mitigation actions" might be a more helpful paradigm. We need to help the tree owner decide, not decide for them.

Here's a tomogram of a tree that was managed by pruning. Is there legit science that says it "needs to come down"?? NE Hollow.png
 
#51
Have somebody with experience in tree risk assessment look at it with you. Sounds like you have an offer from Guy. A few hundred so you can feel confident in purchasing .35 acres or a few hundred to save several thousand if they do need to come down. Sounds like a good investment either way.
Well ... I already had 2 certified arborists come out and look at the big oaks last fall. I was clear with each that I wanted a risk assessment done and why. Both came from reputable companies that do a lot of business in the area. One is from a large business that probably claims most of the work around here; the other is well known and highly respected in these parts and was recommended to me by our city. Verdict? One said take both oaks down - cavities, defects, hypoxylon canker. The other said prune/balance both and just keep an eye on the vertical lesion of the southern red. The second guy never mentioned the bulge on the cherrybark, but I really don't recall if the first guy did.

That's how we roll down here in my area, lol.
 
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#55
I had an opportunity to go onto a neighboring property today and look at a large southern red oak located about 40 yards from this cherrybark. I noticed that the southern red it is starting to exhibit the same bulge as the cherrybark. It is also more prominent on the same eastern side. The southern red is located on a milder grade than the cherrybark. There is another southern red about the same age between the two trees that is not showing any bulge at all. Looking at both of the trees with the belt, the belt appears above the root collar just where the root flares fade into the trunk. Like the cherrybark, the wood in the bulge area is harder when sounded. Thought it was interesting. No increment borer yet.
 
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