blackwall carabiners

Bango Skank

Well-Known Member
Interesting.

If there's any chance of the piece getting caught up on another tree, branch, stub, crotch or any other obstacles on the way down, I think one could lose control.

They could have a place though.

Without a gate I'm not sure they meet the definition of a carabiner.

Thanks for sharing that, Papadirk. Never heard of it before.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Interesting

I wonder if he's deliberately obscuring the bite on bite configuration or just poor video making.

It might have merit.

I poked around and found this page...clever stuff!

Blackwell
 
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Jehinten

Well-Known Member
Is there a load rating on these? It's kind of unfortunate that it will not accept a 1/2" rope but I'm sure you could tie a 1/2" to a screwlink to this hook. I use a similar setup with an open hook and have not had any trouble with it unhooking early on static rigs. My setup does not require that the rope stay in those little grooves either, so it'd be interesting to see how these work out.
 

surveyor

Well-Known Member
Is there a load rating on these? It's kind of unfortunate that it will not accept a 1/2" rope but I'm sure you could tie a 1/2" to a screwlink to this hook. I use a similar setup with an open hook and have not had any trouble with it unhooking early on static rigs. My setup does not require that the rope stay in those little grooves either, so it'd be interesting to see how these work out.
Are you saying that you can use a regular screwlink to make this bight through a bight work also?
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
Are you saying that you can use a regular screwlink to make this bight through a bight work also?
No sorry. I was saying instead of feeding a 12mm or smaller rope through the attachment hole, that you could add a screwlink and then tie a 1/2" rope to that.


This is the setup that I have been using, it works very well and with a little shake once it's on the ground it comes right out.
Screenshot_20190314-092519_Photos.jpgScreenshot_20190314-092735_Photos.jpg
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
@Jehinten

YOu dangled the bait...then...didn't let us bite!

Can you share more about your screwlink system? Clear step by step pics maybe?

I was posting pics as you commented. My previous comment wasn't clear, I do not use a screwlink in my system, just thinking outloud that you could with this system for a wider variety of ropes.
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
Neat idea for solo rigging, may have to give it a try.
I have been using it for a while, as most of my rigging is solo. It works very well, but you have to know when to use it. I do not use it for negative rigging and if the angle of the rope gets too severe I sometimes will clip the sling with the carabiner instead of the hook for a more secure connection. You will then have to go down to unhook it. I plan to soon splice up a different sling for this use instead of what is pictured as the rig-saver is way over built for this purpose, I just used what I had available at the time.

Also you will notice that the hook is connected by a steel carabiner instead of tied straight to the rope, I find that the extra weight helps with flipping the rope to release the limb and there is always a carabiner available for the rigging that requires a little more security.
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
Do you like that better than Double-whip tackling with a sling and biner?
I do like it better. Double whip involves twice as much rope, and once you start to get some brush building up on the ground it's easy to get your rope tangled as your pulling it through the sling.

I haven't yet, but I'm planning on using 2 slings like this one on each end. Solo rigging without pulling the sling back up each time.

Double whip does have its place if your rigging a little bigger on small anchor points or if you need the mechanical advantage to lift, but for light rigging I'm really liking this setup. I tend to run it natural crotch and move it around the tree with me a lot too in broader trees
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
I like it.

I am reluctant to have an open hook.

I DWT'ed something in a stub, not a full branch, natural crotch, not sling & biner, and broke a fence panel. Similar to the possibility with an open hook, mostly fine, but...

So, each trick has its place.
I'll try your method.
Thanks.
 

dsptech

Well-Known Member
I watch some more videos of this Blackwall Carabiner and it doesn't appear that the spring gate and cutout is even necessary.
He added the spring gate to prevent the rope from slipping through the opening.
I don't see the point of the opening.
 

NailerB

Member
No sorry. I was saying instead of feeding a 12mm or smaller rope through the attachment hole, that you could add a screwlink and then tie a 1/2" rope to that.


This is the setup that I have been using, it works very well and with a little shake once it's on the ground it comes right out.
View attachment 58144View attachment 58145
I believe I would trust this method a hell of a lot farther than the Blackwell system. I do have a question about this method. Is that ring really needed? I'm not seeing where the retrieval rope really needs to slide. Would a pc of rope tied to the ring and hitched in place above the hook due the same thing?
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
I believe I would trust this method a hell of a lot farther than the Blackwell system. I do have a question about this method. Is that ring really needed? I'm not seeing where the retrieval rope really needs to slide. Would a pc of rope tied to the ring and hitched in place above the hook due the same thing?
Im not sure that either ring is necessary, although the steel ring may help with retrieval as it prevents cordage on cordage friction. The aluminum ring is not necessary as it is just a way to connect the sling to the rope. I was just using what I had available. It does not slide on the rope , but rest against the termination knot.

You could possibly do away with the red sling by using a midline knot for the carabiner and hook a few feet from the end, and then tying the steel ring on the end. If you were trying to eliminate links in the system.
 
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