Big ole Tree

owScott

Well-Known Member
Found this pretty interesting thought i'd share in case you haven't seen it yet!
Definitely big tree. My question is why do all that rigging to then bring in a crane seems it would have been better to just do the whole tree with a crane. So I get there is less time with the crane doing only the wood, smaller crane bill. But that was 1 day rigging 1 day with crane the trade off is paying the whole crew for two days usually is more than just more crane hours. I look at this equation regularly. Generally bigger crane is more per hour but can do bigger picks, depending on landing of course, and with the right equipment on the ground it goes quicker. 2 days either way except 2nd day should be just wood hauling which requires way less guys. Also why wasn't he on the hook when he was rigging. Some of the rigging was questionable especially the big wood picks. 1 cable on 1 side of the log makes the piece come off wonky and pinches your saw. Wood that big over my head, I want 2 cables 1 on each side and the wood goes straight up. Finally for me when working on a spar on my flip line I want a second tie in. I usually these days would have my climb line chocked on the spar at my knees with my bulldog bone set up single line. 2 reasons if I cut the flipline or it comes off the spar and mainly if anything happens I have a direct escape to the ground for any reason. Amazing tree though worthy of a video.
 
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Finky198

Member
Cool video

Owscott I totally agree the lack of a second tie is important on especially big trees when you can’t always see... of course it’s best to check and recheck your position and cuts, but a backup never hurts.

I don’t do much crane work, but when chunking down big spars I like my 5/8 steel core and I’ll choke my static climbing line with a Grigri or my ID. I have a back up that can aide in position, but I have an instant bail out, as there is zero transition from working to repelling. I swap in a 2n1 lanyard for pines.

Similar methods... I have never need it during a true emergency, but I have practiced coming down on a few occasions to get the feeling.


The balance issue was definitely a little hairy for my taste...
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Definitely big tree. My question is why do all that rigging to then bring in a crane seems it would have been better to just do the whole tree with a crane. So I get there is less time with the crane doing only the wood, smaller crane bill. But that was 1 day rigging 1 day with crane the trade off is paying the whole crew for two days usually is more than just more crane hours. I look at this equation regularly. Generally bigger crane is more per hour but can do bigger picks, depending on landing of course, and with the right equipment on the ground it goes quicker. 2 days either way except 2nd day should be just wood hauling which requires way less guys. Also why wasn't he on the hook when he was rigging. Some of the rigging was questionable especially the big wood picks. 1 cable on 1 side of the log makes the piece come off wonky and pinches your saw. Wood that big over my head, I want 2 cables 1 on each side and the wood goes straight up. Finally for me when working on a spar on my flip line I want a second tie in. I usually these days would have my climb line chocked on the spar at my knees with my bulldog bone set up single line. 2 reasons if I cut the flipline or it comes off the spar and mainly if anything happens I have a direct escape to the ground for any reason. Amazing tree though worthy of a video.
Ow for the win, especially the comments on the less than stellar rigging on the larger logs, and the lack of a second tie in.
 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
I didn't watch yet, but the reason for 2 days, instead of just one big crane day is usually hauling capacity. I know we have done this before cuz it made sense to not put everything on the ground all at once.
 

owScott

Well-Known Member
I didn't watch yet, but the reason for 2 days, instead of just one big crane day is usually hauling capacity. I know we have done this before cuz it made sense to not put everything on the ground all at once.
Their 1st day was chipping and 2nd day was wood handling same amount of capacity needed. Manually or with a crane the branches require the same capacity on day 1. I think what your saying is being able to manage both branches and wood at the same time " all at once" can be tough, I get that. A good crew and a mini with a grapple can chip and stage logs and keep up with the crane if they know what they are doing. Leaving only logs to haul day 2 requiring less guys. An ambitious company could be hauling logs as these other operations are happening. I give that climber props on 1 point he basically did that tree twice. Obviously I don't know all the parameters of the job so I am speculating a bit.
 
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