Beeline 8MM core and sheath eye splice

Big Kawika

New Member
I'd like to know if theres an eye splice in 8MM yellow beeline. A spliced eye that incorporates both the core and sheath. Sheath in contact with the carabiner, thus no exposed core. Not sewn and core protected by the sheath. Is there such a thing?
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
Yes, it can be done. One eye is very easy, two,as on a hitch cord, is a little harder to form the second locked brummel. Another way to get a covered eye is to put a separate, thin cover over the eyes, and put the Beeline cover on after doing both locked brummels. The cord on the right is done this way.
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Big Kawika

New Member
The middle eye splice is what I'm looking for. Which of the"MANY" instruction videos shows how to do the middle one ? Thanks !
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
I know of three ways to make that type of covered eye. The picture shows how to start the first eye, if making a double eye hitch cord. The core is nylon to hopefully show up better.
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The first method is to pull the core out and reinsert back in the eye only. Make the lock brummel, taper and bury the core into itself. Next bury the tail into the cover, leaving the cover on the outside. Now unravel this cover tail along the strands with the red dots up to the core. Separate the now flat cover into three or four groups. Bury each of these in the cover at different lengths to give a taper. Keep the groups long so the ends can be pulled to tighten around eye, and cut off last.

The second method starts the same, but before burying the core into itself, take the cover and thread it through the locked brummel, and bury in the core tail, shown by the red line. The core tail gets buried, and the core and cover combined get buried into the cover.

The third is to skip going through the brummel and just bury the cover on top of the core buried into itself.

That’s the first eye, the easy one! With the second eye, instead of having the end of the core to make the locked brummel, a loop of core is extracted at the throat. The short section of core goes through the loop and is unbraided,halved to go around the the loop, and rebraided, tapered and buried, then the core is milked into cover.

Those are the basics.
 

Big Kawika

New Member
Nice ! Boy.... a video of these proceedures would really complete this education. "That's my shy way of saying i need more than words and still photos ". I'm not trying to be fussy here. I am as competent as is nessesary for life reliant rope work and splicing. Which youtube videos cover these proceedures? Thanks for the patient, kind, helpful response!
 

Big Kawika

New Member
I'm sure someone out there'll be knowledgeable on the subject of 8mm beeline eye splice videos, Incorporating both core and sheath. Thanks !
 

Big Kawika

New Member
I called Yale, spoke to their arborist rope salesman about the above mentioned splice. He directed me to the written instructions on their "Yale Maxibraid Plus eye splice". The salesman says this is their only best suited method for a Beeline splice incorporating the outer sheath in the eye. It's not a splice they usually do because it's time consuming, difficult and ends up being quite long in terms of used up core in the actual spliced ends. Thus making a shorter eye-n-eye sling would be too bulky for a supple friction knot. TIME IS MONEY. Also that beeline derives almost all of its strength from the core. The sheath is protection only. So the splice they use has exposed core at the eye. I hope any of this makes sense.
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
I'd like to know if theres an eye splice in 8MM yellow beeline. A spliced eye that incorporates both the core and sheath. Sheath in contact with the carabiner, thus no exposed core. Not sewn and core protected by the sheath. Is there such a thing?

assuming your concern is the core being exposed and possibly damaged, have you looked into dipping the eyes? I forget the product used but I have seen that done to protect the core.
 

Big Kawika

New Member
You might be referring to” plastidip" an air dry (cure) liquid rubber dip coating. Nice idea, although it will wear, chafe and rip under the loads seen at a flexible eye. I know this first hand from dipping whole eyes in it and seeing the peeling that occurs at the stress points where chafing occurs against metal. It's a good approach for encapsulation of fraying ends of strap, rope, sewn seams that see little direct impact or rubbing. Thanks for the suggestion though!
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
Typical, the instructions for the Maxi Plus that he gave you are used for standing rigging on sailboats. They need the longer bury because the line is loaded for extended periods of time, not how we use it.
If I knew your splicing experience, we might be able to succeed if we take it a step at a time, rather trying to decode the instructions above, either here or in pm.
 

Big Kawika

New Member
You make a good point Brocky. My goal is to know how to make it, practice making it and have that knowledge in my tool box. I'll still buy and use officially made eyes. I enjoy the process of learning skills that the mere mortal can't fathom. Having more than book knowledge and hearsay appeals to my sensibilities. A one eyed man is king in a world of blind people. Thanks for engaging.
 

MorningStar

New Member
This isn't quite an answer to the question you're asking but maybe a small thimble in each eye would achieve the same result? They have small plastic thimbles at marine supply stores (and online) that work nicely with 8mm cordage.
 

Mowerr

Well-Known Member
Nice ! Boy.... a video of these proceedures would really complete this education. "That's my shy way of saying i need more than words and still photos ". I'm not trying to be fussy here. I am as competent as is nessesary for life reliant rope work and splicing. Which youtube videos cover these proceedures? Thanks for the patient, kind, helpful response!
Then u better hit that "like" button
 

ARLO

Well-Known Member
It is not exactly what you are looking for, but you should check out my videos on how to splice and whiplock 10mm Bee Line prusiks. I splice both 8 and 10 mm Bee Line the same way.


8mm Bee Line is also easy to splice with a standard double-braid splice with a 1 fid bury. I have done several of them and they hold up fine.
 

ARLO

Well-Known Member
Here are double-braid splices in 10mm Bee Line. I have used these types of splices quite a bit and have had no problems. The only concern with these is that the core fibers can abrade on each other and gradually weaken over time. But I generally wear them out long before that becomes an issue.IMG_4239.jpg
 

ARLO

Well-Known Member
Here are double-braid splices in 10mm Bee Line. I have used these types of splices quite a bit and have had no problems. The only concern with these is that the core fibers can abrade on each other and gradually weaken over time. But I generally wear them out long before that becomes an issue.View attachment 58967
Arghhhh! Never mind guys. The pictures I showed in the previous post are Ocean Poly, not Bee Line. I got in a rush and was thinking about double braid splices in Ocean Poly as opposed to Bee Line. Sorry about the confusion.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
It seems that with the 8mm having 75 percent Technora in the cover, that possible added strength isn’t being used in a naked eye splice. The double braid splice would also solve the OP’s problem.
 
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