Battery Saw Onsite Charging

ArborEthos

New Member
I'm looking into getting some battery powered saws in the near future. I was wondering if anyone had a good solution to easy on-site charging of batteries between uses. I was hoping to start with 4 batteries and 2 saws and it would be nice to charge on site just in case. I'm looking at the 36v stihl or husqvarna so I don't think a typical power inverter for my truck would suffice.
 

ArborEthos

New Member
Don't have a chatging solution for you, just wanted to say to not get the Stihl. The Husqvarna's are much better. And this is coming from a Stihl fan.
What's your reasoning? I've read swapping out the husqvarna 3/8 sprocket for the 1/4" might be the way to go. But I haven't found many the t536 is straight up better than 160t.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
I've used customer outdoor outlets to charge batteries for drills. Of course I'll ask if they are home, but just do it if they aren't...kinda par for the course if contractors are working on site to use power...
 
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southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
You don't expect electricians or carpenters to bring a power supply when the house is wired, or to not use the outside water faucets.

KISS
 
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NailerB

Member
Good point. But if you were working in a cemetery or large park how far do ya want to have to go to get to power? I would think that your going to have some pc of equipment running that can power the inverter.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Plenty of inverters around. No need to get one that puts out more power than you need for charging. It isn't hard to calculate power needs. Just be careful you don't discharge your starting battery with chargeing. Then you'll have to jump start your charge battery

Just lug into house with a good cord
 

NailerB

Member
Not to change the subject but ya might want to think about a cooler to put the chargers and batteries in while charging. I've seen the time when building bridges that the battery was so hot it would not charge, we went the cooler route with some ice to solve the problem.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Or...wait to see if four batteries is enough for a day of work. Hold off on field charging until you see how long the batteries last. I have Dewalt cordless. The 20v on my fast charger charge so fast! I don't know about the larger ones though
 

BooRad

New Member
I see Husky has a vehicle 12V charger.

I use outdoor outlit from HO when I think I'll need, but away from power source (outlet) no solution besides a generator. Haven't ever need that.

Only use power pruner/trimmer to date.

Looking for top handle real soon, was hoping sthil would come through, but from what I see Husky is the way to go.
 

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climbstihl

Well-Known Member
What's your reasoning? I've read swapping out the husqvarna 3/8 sprocket for the 1/4" might be the way to go. But I haven't found many the t536 is straight up better than 160t.
It's not even about power, battery life or weight, it's about it's features, some of which are a safety concern with the Stihl.
1. The Husky has an on/off switch with an indicator LED. The Stihl only has the option to partially remove the battery to turn it off. The Husky also has an indicator light for the chainbrake. All you have to do with the Hisky to safely store your chainsaw one-handed is turn it off. You don't even have to touch the chainbrake. And, as soon as you take it in your hand, you know exactly what's going on, whether it's switched off, or the chainbrake is engaged.
(2. The hole for clearing sawdust on the Stihl is too small, it will get bogged down quickly, especially with soft, wet wood.) This has been enlarged, I don't know how much.
3. The battery slot on the Stihl is only open at the top, dirt and sawdust will be in there all the time. The Husky has a flowthrough design.
4. The Husky has an Eco mode, if you're just cutting small limbs you can save battery life.
5. The Husky's oil tank lasts longer than the battery, the Stihl's oil tank with certain battery sizes (not just the largest) will run out before the battery.
Not saying the Stihl is a bad saw, it's just not as technologically matured as the Husky.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
DW is not likely up to competing with Husky in long term pro use. That's not my expectation. For what I need its fine...and...it uses the same batteries that the rest of my DW fleet use. It'll travel nicely in my camper without the hassle, and smell, of mixed gas. I've used it on a few small tree jobs and cut up some 7" mulberry. Not as fast as my Husky 338...but good enough.

My left hand still makes a move for the recoil to start the saw! 45 years of muscle memory.
 

Bucknut

Well-Known Member
My left hand still makes a move for the recoil to start the saw! 45 years of muscle memory.
I was thinking about that. I know I would do the same thing probably for weeks.

Saw a video where the guy brought up a valid safety concern about electrics, specifically the Milwaukee. He was uncomfortable with a saw that was in effect always “on” but silent. Experience has conditioned us to know that a running or idling saw is a dangerous saw. But electrics are just as dangerous when they are silent. (The Milwaukee apparently does not have any indicator lights.). Just gotta be vigilant about using the brake I guess.
 

Benjo75

Member
We use an inverter. It's not a huge one it's the one from wal mart for about $50. It has been working great for a couple years. If we're going to be using it all day it will either be in the bucket truck or the brush truck whichever is running the most. I do have a 3,000 watt inverter in 2 of the bucket trucks which works great too. It also runs a shop fan in the summer and anything else needed. I wanted to see what it would do one time the power was out and it ran the fridge, microwave, lamp, tv, satellite and coffee pot. When I turned the stove burner on it dimmed the lights a little so turned it right back off.

Obviously we will use the customers outside outlets when available and close. I keep a 100' extension cord in most of the vehicles too. You can buy the little 300 and 400 watt generators from harbor freight or other places that work well and burn very little fuel. The last one I bought still runs great. It's a 2 stroke and came with and extra ring for the piston. I think it came fron Northern Tool.
 

climbstihl

Well-Known Member
I was thinking about that. I know I would do the same thing probably for weeks.

Saw a video where the guy brought up a valid safety concern about electrics, specifically the Milwaukee. He was uncomfortable with a saw that was in effect always “on” but silent. Experience has conditioned us to know that a running or idling saw is a dangerous saw. But electrics are just as dangerous when they are silent. (The Milwaukee apparently does not have any indicator lights.). Just gotta be vigilant about using the brake I guess.
Yeah, that's what bothered me with the Stihl too. No way to turn it off, except to take out the battery one click, but who does that. The Husky has a switch right on top of the handle, plus indicator lights. Of course you still can't hear if it's on, but I'm sure you'll adjust to that quickly.
 

TallTreeClimber

Well-Known Member
I don't know if anyone had said yet, but most inverters that I have and have used are not nearly big enough to supply my dual battery Makita charger. My charger needs 460w at 120v.

But I can get hours of use out of a single set of batteries. I've never even used my back up battery set yet... but I don't do this for a living.. ymmv.
 

treebing

Well-Known Member
You have to get a feel cycle marine battery that is charged by the vehicle while driving with a relay that stops it from drawing from the vehicle battery. You could also supplement with a solar panel on the roof.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
I was thinking about that. I know I would do the same thing probably for weeks.

Saw a video where the guy brought up a valid safety concern about electrics, specifically the Milwaukee. He was uncomfortable with a saw that was in effect always “on” but silent. Experience has conditioned us to know that a running or idling saw is a dangerous saw. But electrics are just as dangerous when they are silent. (The Milwaukee apparently does not have any indicator lights.). Just gotta be vigilant about using the brake I guess.
I forget to fill up the bar oil on my milwaukee because the gas never runs out...

The milwaukee has a double action trigger. I still have to focus on the double action to get it going. Is that not enough? Do you need a second stop button in case you accidentally press the go button? Agree about the overall issue of gas vs. battery saw safety - you definitely can't get cut by a saw that is off.
 
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