Basket Hitch

TimberJack

Well-Known Member
Is a basket hitch acheivable in tree work? Long ago I was showed a technique utilizing two slings to create a chocking basket. When the slings get too short for traditional choking you can run one of the slings around the trunk put a shackle in each end then take the second sling and run it through each shackle and connect both ends of second sling back to crane hook. Today was one of the rare occasions that I deployed the chocking basket hitch and the crane operator was not impressed. His take on the technique was that it was not a basket at all and that i over loaded his slings and went onto explain that a basket hitch is not acheivable doing tree work.
 

chiselbit

Well-Known Member
What if you take 2 slings (A and B) sling A goes on one side of the log, B on the other. Take sling A eye and pass it thru sling B eye then to hook. Take the other end of sling B, run it thru eye of sling A and to hook. Would be similar to what we call a “Bridle” when setting chokers in the logging industry. Seems more basket like to me
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
I think I have done that without the shackles just running the second strap through the eyes. It was a long time ago. As I recall, it was used in a lift of a log from the ground as opposed to a pick from the tree. I remember the choke being less tight than a regular choked sling. The shackles would get a better choke. As long as the strap that wraps the tree doesn't wrap more than 2/3rds of the way around, I would feel comfortable with testing it low and slow. I think it should work fine, as long as the wrapping strap is short enough. If the shackles get too close, it will lose cinch tightness.
 

TimberJack

Well-Known Member
Oh it just fine but the sling rating 4200 choked, 5300 straight, 10600 basket, the crane operator stated that the basket numbers and straight pull numbers dont apply to tree work every thing we do is chocked
 

chiselbit

Well-Known Member
In retrospect my way isn’t a basket. Just a way to get a log that’s too big for a single sling. And I don’t know if it even works on a crane pick, I’ve only done it skidding logs. We have some long damn slings for the crane so I’ve never had to try it.
 
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Reach

Well-Known Member
We use this method all the time, our crane guy loves it and it works great. It’s especially nice for vertically lifting logs where there’s no space for the log to tilt like usually happens with simple choked slings.
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
We use this method all the time, our crane guy loves it and it works great. It’s especially nice for vertically lifting logs where there’s no space for the log to tilt like usually happens with simple choked slings.
2 slings, one on each side. Makes for no tilting. Might be what you mean, not sure.
 

Mowerr

Well-Known Member
2 slings, one on each side. Makes for no tilting. Might be what you mean, not sure.
I think they cant do what your saying because the slings didn't have enough length to choke the log... if im understanding the OP correctly
When the slings get too short for traditional choking you can run one of the slings around the trunk put a shackle in each end then take the second sling and run it through each shackle and connect both ends of second sling back to crane hook.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
2 slings, one on each side. Makes for no tilting. Might be what you mean, not sure.
It is two slings, and on opposite sides, but instead of the slings being choked like normal, the slings are attached to each other. It may have a slightly higher chance of slippage than normal chokers, but as long as there is something above to stop any sliding it’s completely safe.

If you’re real worried, put a little notch in each side of the log so the slings have something better to bite into. We do that with Tulip Poplars all the time, as the bark tends to slide right off the log. I have a friend who saw a Tuliptree log slip it’s bark and drop through the roof of a three story house. It punched through the roof and landed in the basement...
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
It is two slings, and on opposite sides, but instead of the slings being choked like normal, the slings are attached to each other. It may have a slightly higher chance of slippage than normal chokers, but as long as there is something above to stop any sliding it’s completely safe.

If you’re real worried, put a little notch in each side of the log so the slings have something better to bite into. We do that with Tulip Poplars all the time, as the bark tends to slide right off the log. I have a friend who saw a Tuliptree log slip it’s bark and drop through the roof of a three story house. It punched through the roof and landed in the basement...
Ok I get it. The log through the roof is nuts. I hope no one was hurt. That would be a terrible day.
 

treebilly

Well-Known Member
I’ve heard it called the “secret handshake” and I recall correctly @Steve Connally did have one slip off. I prefer to slightly notch the log even in a normal choked situation.
 

craneguy1

Well-Known Member
Yes...that was the nomenclature. It was a long time ago, but i asked what the technique was because i didn't know. Seems to me he/somebody also mentioned bridle. There is a pick here somewhere. I think he made a vid also.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
It’s all about scale. One thing might work great for lighter to mid sized work. When really pushing the limits you can’t mess around.

I tripled checked with the crane operator when setting up some climbing poles. He insisted on two choked slings well below the top end of the Log’s. All he was doing was picking up the tops while the butt was slid into a hole. Big 130’ Doug fir logs about 20” on the small end.
He got the first one about 70 degrees up in the air and the bark slipped. This shock loaded the crane, causing it to slip again and again. The whole crane was walking around on it’s out riggers like a crab, resting about 6’ off to the side as he wired down as fast as he could.
Two sections of boom bent, and cracked welds in the lower boom.
Point being, most the time this works just fine. Shackles instead of choking directly would have helped, rigging in a different manner, being open to input, all these elements come into play.
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
It’s all about scale. One thing might work great for lighter to mid sized work. When really pushing the limits you can’t mess around.

I tripled checked with the crane operator when setting up some climbing poles. He insisted on two choked slings well below the top end of the Log’s. All he was doing was picking up the tops while the butt was slid into a hole. Big 130’ Doug fir logs about 20” on the small end.
He got the first one about 70 degrees up in the air and the bark slipped. This shock loaded the crane, causing it to slip again and again. The whole crane was walking around on it’s out riggers like a crab, resting about 6’ off to the side as he wired down as fast as he could.
Two sections of boom bent, and cracked welds in the lower boom.
Point being, most the time this works just fine. Shackles instead of choking directly would have helped, rigging in a different manner, being open to input, all these elements come into play.
Could you have cut notches in the logs to hold the straps or would that have messed up the finished product? Or pound in spikes or screw lags in just above the straps that could later be removed if necessary? I wouldn't have anticipated that happening. We don't have 130' logs of anything around here, but the same thing could happen with something shorter if the bark isn't strong enough to hold. I'm glad you shared this story. It's information that could come in handy to me or others.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Could you have cut notches in the logs to hold the straps or would that have messed up the finished product? Or pound in spikes or screw lags in just above the straps that could later be removed if necessary? I wouldn't have anticipated that happening. We don't have 130' logs of anything around here, but the same thing could happen with something shorter if the bark isn't strong enough to hold. I'm glad you shared this story. It's information that could come in handy to me or others.
If production notches and shackles would be bomber. But notches would have messed up the poles for the climbers.
Shackles would have been enough. Steel chokers maybe? Spikes would work if substantial
 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
Theres always the option to wrap twice with longer slings choked.
I don't like the 2 slings choking each other because you lose redundancy.
 
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