Basic Gear Needed for ddrt

efritz588

New Member
I’m trying to get into climbing and have been watching videos and researching like crazy but it seems everyone has a different opinion on needed gear. I was considering climbing ddrt but do not know the gear I need. A friend has given me a saddle, climbing spikes
, 75 ft of 3 strand rigging rope and a chainsaw lanyard. I was considering buying a 2 in 1 adjustable lanyard, 150 feet of 16 strand firefly rope(for climbing), pruner, handsaw and a couple steel locking snaps. I was going to climb using Blake’s hitch because I’m trying to spend as little money as I can.
My question now what other gear do I need for rigging/climbing? And is the gear I selected a good choice? Thanks.
 

Bob Bob

Well-Known Member
I’m trying to get into climbing and have been watching videos and researching like crazy but it seems everyone has a different opinion on needed gear. I was considering climbing ddrt but do not know the gear I need. A friend has given me a saddle, climbing spikes
, 75 ft of 3 strand rigging rope and a chainsaw lanyard. I was considering buying a 2 in 1 adjustable lanyard, 150 feet of 16 strand firefly rope(for climbing), pruner, handsaw and a couple steel locking snaps. I was going to climb using Blake’s hitch because I’m trying to spend as little money as I can.
My question now what other gear do I need for rigging/climbing? And is the gear I selected a good choice? Thanks.
Work climbing or recreational climbing? Probably work climbing since you mention rigging, right?

Peter Jenkins' Tree Climbing Basics is a classic DVD that is still worth a view if starting from scratch with the Blakes, but it's geared towards recreational climbing. http://treeclimbing.com/index.php/hikashop-menu-for-categories-listing/product/1-dvd-tree-climbing-basics
 

Burrapeg

Well-Known Member
Check out the free videos at climbingarborist.com. There is a huge wealth of instruction and info there. And I second the mention of The Tree Clilmber's Companion. Best book for the money, packed with information, drawings, etc. and not very expensive. Good luck!
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
Do you know how to manage trees (rigging forces and proper pruning if you are doing tree care instead of removals)?

60' up is not the place to learn.

Otherwise the piece of equipment you didn't mention is a friction saver.

An eye and eye is only $30 and MUCH nicer than a Blake's.

I'd also get Al snaps instead of steel...

And another vote for tree climbers companion.
 

oldoakman

Well-Known Member
To be very basic, all you need is a rope. A saddle can be formed using a bowline on a bight or a French bowline leaving a tail long enough to tie your friction hitch.
 

Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
I’m going to say this right now so you don’t kill yourself. If you are not 100 percent proficient with a saw on the ground, do NOT take it into the tree! And I don’t mean starting it. I mean how to properly make cuts- all of them. And the consequences of making a bad one! Do not just start in the tree what needs mastery on the ground.
Once you pass that phase of enlightenment, find someone to teach you the ropes. While some things can be learned ONLINE, this ain’t one of them. This is a very dangerous sport! You can die and many do. You can severely hurt yourself. My suggestion would be to learn spurless technique first, then after you get the hang of that, make holes in trees. Only make holes in trees you intend to kill.
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
I’m trying to get into climbing and have been watching videos and researching like crazy but it seems everyone has a different opinion on needed gear. I was considering climbing ddrt but do not know the gear I need. A friend has given me a saddle, climbing spikes
, 75 ft of 3 strand rigging rope and a chainsaw lanyard. I was considering buying a 2 in 1 adjustable lanyard, 150 feet of 16 strand firefly rope(for climbing), pruner, handsaw and a couple steel locking snaps. I was going to climb using Blake’s hitch because I’m trying to spend as little money as I can.
My question now what other gear do I need for rigging/climbing? And is the gear I selected a good choice? Thanks.
Welcome. I was in your position a few years ago and went through some training/climbing clinics, did a lot of reading, researching all the gear and as much as I could get my hands on. I've since developed an online resource for rec-tree-climbers and offer consulting services for interested people who are looking to intelligently and mindfully acclimate into the recreational tree climbing world. Sorry if this sounds like a self-gratuitous promotion, but I'm around if you're interested.
 
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rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
The best way to start work climbing is to work for an experienced climber that will let you do easy stuff/supervise. Harness and rope and biners and lanyard will get you climbing, but there is tons of little stuff about cutting in trees that is not money see, monkey do. Make good decisions!
And expert supervision really is the best option, however you can get it.
Good luck and welcome.
 

efritz588

New Member
I should’ve added in the initial post that I’m haveing a retired climber(friend who gave me the gear) show me how to climb. He hasn’t climbed for 20 or so years so the gear he used is different than a lot of the Gear out there now which is why I’m asking these questions about gear. I appreciate the feedback from you all.
 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
Great stuff, mentorship is ideal for beginners. Plenty of gear heads to interview around here, but just as many opinions, too. A basic 16 strand rope is an affordable place to start.
Learn slowly and practice a lot so that you have confidence and comfort at height before attempting complicated, serious work. Steven is right to warn you, figure it out BEFORE you go up.
 

swingdude

De' Island Buzzer
Leave chainsaws out for a while. Get proficient in rope access and moving through the crown. Learning ideal TIPs that allow you to work where needed comfortable as possible. Many climbers suck at two important things finding good TIPs and creating good work position. TIP= Tie in Point. Try to gain a TIP which creates good rope angles....at position of cutting. Climb safe bud.
 
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I believe the best climbers are those that spend the time to thoroughly learn all the ground work before throwing a harness on. If you are looking to be a decent climber, I suggest learning the ground first. You will literally learn the ropes and understand what is happening on the ground. Being able to be on site and watch another climber perform all the essential tasks will also help you to get a better understanding of work positioning and TIPs. Maybe you could try a ground position at a local tree service. Not trying to discourage you from climbing. I've seen many climbers jump right into climbing and end up struggling with the TIP's and Rigging.
 

Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
One common thing that happens to beginners is they freeze up when in small wood really high up. Let me be clear here, this is really dangerous! When you get 150’ off the ground in wood that is as wide as your forearm it can be really spooky. I’ve been doin this game for many years and it still gets me spooked sometimes. You will need to be in control so panic does not cloud your judgement. You will also need to understand loading forces because many of these tops will need to be hung in the same spar your tied to. Looks easy from the ground, I assure you it’s not the same in the tree. You will have to abandon the mission if the weather decides to get ugly and know when to call it. I hate to say this but if there is a positive side to Humans videos- you get to see what can happen even to a guy that thinks he’s got it going on. Bravado? Maybe? Lucky? Definitely! Always better to learn from the mistakes of others.
If you want to play, maybe try a season out with a local certified tree service. You will likely learn all you need to know as long as they let you try. Don’t work with Utility arbs, not that they don’t know how, because they do, but because they spend many of their hours trimming back trees and chipping, not as much in the climbing dismantling side of things. Try to find a good residential arb company that does repairs and maintenance as well as removals especially with cranes! Seems to be the wave of the future?
 

Scheffa

Active Member
Stephen I agree with everything you said except the utility arb part. I do both and find that a lot of lines climbers are far more efficient than residential ones. Here in aus it is mandatory for us to spike trees when climbing on lines, you won’t find many residential climbers who climb the amount of trees a lines guy does in a day.
The residential guys a certainty more proficient in rigging, cranes etc. but there isn’t much more incentive than 66kv a bit over a metre away to make sure you get your technique both climbing and cutting spot on.
 

Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
Stephen I agree with everything you said except the utility arb part. I do both and find that a lot of lines climbers are far more efficient than residential ones. Here in aus it is mandatory for us to spike trees when climbing on lines, you won’t find many residential climbers who climb the amount of trees a lines guy does in a day.
The residential guys a certainty more proficient in rigging, cranes etc. but there isn’t much more incentive than 66kv a bit over a metre away to make sure you get your technique both climbing and cutting spot on.
Yeah I get that, but here in my neck of the woods, line arbs are forever trimming and chipping. Your area is likely not as thick with forests. I’m not sure what the OPs area is like with trees. We are smack in the conifer belt here, very low population and miles of 3 phase and single phase. My buddies that work for Asplundh mostly work out of the bucket all day long. They get some ( side jobs ) where they get to do some climbing. And sure they climb on occasion durin their regular work but the majority is trimming 2 meter all day long. Of course there has been some storm clean ups! Normally 3 or so a year. The Utility Arb is a really good cert to have though. There are many jobs that can’t be done without it.
Oh here almost all the work around power lines here is done from bucket truck. BC Hydro crew sometimes shadows us and neutralize the power in some cases. Our company is not a line clearance one though, we don’t have thar man power to service those contracts too. So we rarely do hot work.
 

Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
There is a few Ut Arbs here that fell trees near transmission lines though! And a crew that does rig and pulls almost exclusively. Remember we are low population here so very often property is not developed so trees that are dead, dying or diseased or simply too close to power can be choked and pulled back into the woods via truck. Very often Asplundh will have a pulling crew do a stretch like that.
 

Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
Stephen I agree with everything you said except the utility arb part. I do both and find that a lot of lines climbers are far more efficient than residential ones. Here in aus it is mandatory for us to spike trees when climbing on lines, you won’t find many residential climbers who climb the amount of trees a lines guy does in a day.
The residential guys a certainty more proficient in rigging, cranes etc. but there isn’t much more incentive than 66kv a bit over a metre away to make sure you get your technique both climbing and cutting spot on.
Do you work for Asplundh in Aus? Good company to work for!
 
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