Arborjet

#26
You may reach out to him again and see if he'll meet you on an injection job. No better place to get training on the equipment than from the source.
 

Tyler Durden

Well-Known Member
#27
One of my biggest issues was that he has no experience with the system I use. I know he is a wealth of knowledge on the products themself, but he only uses the arborair system.

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#28
He may prefer the air system, but i imagine he has to know the ins and outs of all their equipment as part of his job. I'd still get him out there if your having trouble, worst case scenario he treats a tree for you!
 

oakwilt

Well-Known Member
#29
Flu season. Worse yet, an aggressive strain without a viable (+/- <30% effectiveness) anti-viral.
Yet this morning I saw 3 different ads on t.v. for meds to treat rheumatoid arthritis and plaque
psoriasis with immune-system suppressants. "Can cause lymphoma or other cancers". In the least.
Rainbow Tree Care is pushing the same shit on trees.
 

JoshR

Active Member
#30
Airspade that shit, backfill with composted wood chips and perhaps add some myro. Don't forget to water, and cross your fingers and toes.

Fertilizer will just feed the fungi more...
Good point on the fertilizer feeding the fungi. You reminded me of something whenever I took a cultivation class once and the teacher mentioned that nitrogen will cause the hyphae to “grow” quickly. I think he said that too much can cause the fungi to basically explode. He was taking about growing in a controlled environment for the most part so, I wouldn’t think that excess nitrogen would actually kill off the fungus in a natural setting. I’m thinking too many variables.
Anyways, been thinking about getting an Arborjet system myself. I think it could be a good offering as part of my business structure. Just reading through JD3000’s posts makes my head swim about what all has to be taken into consideration to do a good job. It’s a totally different avenue than removals and pruning.
 

JD3000

Well-Known Member
#31
Excess inorganic fertilizers (salt...) Can absolutely kill some soil microorganisms. Most of which we have little to no understanding of.

Another posibility is the the soil becomes so fertile that the tree no longer has a mineral need for symbionts such as mycorrhizea and the relationship is ended. This can open up the tree to potential root rot pathogens as the fungi are no longer there to out-compete the bad guys. Another negative could be increased drought damage as I believe at least some mycorrhizael fungi also have a role in water uptake

Feed the soil, don't "feed" the plant.
 

JoshR

Active Member
#32
Excess inorganic fertilizers (salt...) Can absolutely kill some soil microorganisms. Most of which we have little to no understanding of.

Another posibility is the the soil becomes so fertile that the tree no longer has a mineral need for symbionts such as mycorrhizea and the relationship is ended. This can open up the tree to potential root rot pathogens as the fungi are no longer there to out-compete the bad guys. Another negative could be increased drought damage as I believe at least some mycorrhizael fungi also have a role in water uptake

Feed the soil, don't "feed" the plant.
Are there any known root rot pathogens besides fungi? Just wondering.
 

JoshR

Active Member
#35
I can think of a few parasitic plants like the coral root orchid, and what about nematodes?
I forgot about nematodes. I remember them being mentioned in the soil section of the arb cert study guide book but, I don’t remember their specific role.
 

JD3000

Well-Known Member
#38
Yeah I see boxwoods and some perennials that get them but wouldn't even know what to look for on most other plants
 
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