Arborists in da nort

Merak

New Member
So what do arborists do all winter in the Great White North? Do you cut and prune all thru the 1-3 feet of snow and below 30 degree F weather. Or do you plow snow or something else to pay the bills.I'm here in Wisconsin wondering about how you sustain your business during the slow months.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
When I was in MN I still worked. The crew was down to closer to 20-30 hours/week though. Temps were not a factor. You're saying that 30 is a threshold? I thought that New Richmond was in Northern, well maybe Middle, Wisconsin. You're talking like someone from IL :)

Deep snow got to be wearisome. I'd bring my snowblower to the job and cut paths from the driveway to the trees. Then I'd spiral out with paths about 5' apart. All debris could be accessed from the paths. I'd offer two prices to my clients. One price to cleanup the best we could in the deep snow. The other if we came out after snowmelt to rake up like a summer job. It was rare that we had to do rerakes. Instead of hiding the cost in a phony price I liked to be upfront and offer ala cart pricing. Why pay for the salad if you're not going to eat it?

After working seasonally for so long it felt good to have things slow down a little. It takes financial discipline to make it though.

Last week I talked with Jeff Jepson. He's up in north central MN, about an hour north east of Brainerd. He said that they have three feet of snow and lots of work. It takes a different person, mentally and physically, to make a living outdoors in the true snowbelt.
 

Merak

New Member
Hey now! No reason to be insultin! I just threw 30 degrees out there. How bout minus 30. I was just fishing for some info out there. I'm still working on a career change and would like to know if I will have work year round in this field. Still have to get over to that outfit in Roberts you told me about. THE Jeff Jepson eh. That book is the most ut.
 

Zac

Active Member
I've worked in the frozen tundra of Green Bay since the end of December. We tend to call it when the temps get colder than -10, when the trees are holding a lot of snow or when we just want to stay in and play video games or something. This winter hasn't warranted a snowblower for us yet but we have shoveled paths through the snow. We're one of the biger companies in the city, so we have enough work to keep busy. Raking snow is gettign old though....


Zac
 

jerseywild

Member
[ QUOTE ]
Come on up here if you want frozen tundra.

[/ QUOTE ]

I’ll pass on that one. I will stick it out in good old South Jersey. Not much snow but plenty of winter mud.
/forum/images/graemlins/iconcan.gif
 

Mangoes

Well-Known Member
Cold is good. Last Saturday I did some selective 'vista' removals at a waterfront property on Lake Simcoe (Roches Point for those fetching maps) Mostly all small cedars and ash to get some more views of the water. But the job included the removal of a 60' white pine in severe decline. Tree would have been an all day job in the summer, humping cookies of wood and brush up a 20' bank from the water's edge. Instead I layed it out on the ice, then drove my 'baby' chip truck from a boat launch down the road. Chipped the brush, went to dump and then came back for the logs. Full load tipped the scales at 4890kg.....on the ice. No worries though, the lakes got over 24" of the stuff. Its nothing to see 10-12 pickups congregating around a village of fishing huts.
 

TreeJunkie

New Member
Mangoes,

/forum/images/graemlins/shocked.gifThat must take some balls! I can see an unloaded pickup however, chipper and a full load would have me nervous. What if?

Not that i've ever seen 2 feet of ice around these parts.
 

Colin

Administrator
[ QUOTE ]
Come on up here if you want frozen tundra.

[/ QUOTE ]

I was waiting for you to say sumptin...
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
I've chopped/drilled through four feet of ice up on the MN/Ontario border. As the chopping went deeper the ice changed color and texture. Very pretty.
 

samT

New Member
I've seen a swinger go through the ice. not pretty. The ice was thick in the morning, not so thick by noon.
 

RGus

New Member
I worked one winter in MN. Spent a few days doing a job removing a large amount of Buckthorn on a hillside and at the bottom of the hill there was a lake. We made a large sled out of PVC pipe and pulled the sled across the lake with an ATV. We parked all of the trucks at the landing and did all of our chipping there. It worked out great, and let me tell you it was much nicer pulling the bruch down the hill and not up.
 

Rich_O

Member
Yes you do. We were very glad the ice was nice and thick for this willow that failed. I did have the waders with me just in case, but I would much rather walk on the ice. /forum/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 

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Rich_O

Member
As you can see the brush is already gone. The real fun was tossing the logs over that sea wall and not falling on your ars looking at a log following you. /forum/images/graemlins/hitaxeonthehead.gif
 
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