Arborist Supllies

mTn

New Member
Hello,

I am new to your industry and was quickly impressed by the passion that professional arborists have for your craft. You guys are skilled athletes flying around in the trees!

I am considering buying into an arborist supply business. Can anyone comment on the good, bad, and the ugly? How much equipment do you buy? How often is it replaced. Do you use a favorite supplier? Would you rather buy from a person or is catalog or web OK? Etc. Etc.

Any insights would be greatly appreciated.
 

NickfromWI

Well-Known Member
Kind of a vague question. Be more specific and I'll bet you'll get more responses.

Harness might cost you the most, but it will last you a looooong time, so try a few out before you buy.

Some people change their climbing lines with the seasons. Others might get a year or more out of one.

Online, over the phone, I don't think it matters. If you have a preference, go for it. Sherrill is the big-dog in the market, but there are smaller guys that sure do a good job staying caught up with them. Check out Oklahoma Arborist Supplies.

love
nick
 

Louie_Hampton

New Member
The way I read your post, you are considering getting into the arborist supply business, not becoming an arborist or tree climber. You want to know how to be successful. Is that correct?

Assuming that it is, the best advice I can offer, is that you become just as passionite about the business as your prospective clients. If you have an honest interest and talk with the arborists in your area, you'll get all the information you need.

When Sherrill and Vermeer partnered up, Steve Johnson at our local Vermeer dealership (Irving TX) didn't know anything about our needs, or anything tree related for that matter. He jumped in, took a genuine interest and has become a real asset. He keeps up with what is new. Educates himself about what works and what doesn't, and works hard to stock what we need and what we want. Because of his efforts I for one, and I think many others in the DFW Metroplex, shop there first.

On the other hand, Buckingham equipment is available in a few saw shops in the area. For the most part, (I can think of one exception) nobody has shown the level of interest that Steve has. They don't put in the effort, and so they don't move much merchandise.

If you love it and it shows, if you are dedicated to providing the best customer service that you can, you'll most likely have success. If your just a cash hoe, you might as well not waste your time.

Louie Hampton
 

Mangoes

Well-Known Member
I get the same vibe as well, so on that note I have an opinion to add as well. For some odd reason I have slightly more advanced knowledge about gear than alot of the local arboriculture workforce. As a result when I inquire about a product that I already know alot about and the sales rep starts feeding me a line or coming up with BS to make the sale I get a little perturbed. An educated sales rep will provide their client with the best product for the clients needs. Theres a guy up here with every potential to do very well selling gear/equipment, and I try to mentor him a bit, but he did bug me when he started selling carabiners that only required 2 motions to open (I forget the make and model off hand I think they were DMM) to my students in the arborist apprenticeship program.
 

Treespotter

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Theres a guy up here with every potential to do very well selling gear/equipment, and I try to mentor him a bit, but he did bug me when he started selling carabiners that only required 2 motions to open (I forget the make and model off hand I think they were DMM) to my students in the arborist apprenticeship program.

[/ QUOTE ]

Talk to that man Mangoes before accidents start happening. Advice him that, moraly, it's not only the falling treeclimbers foult. If you're sent up that tree without propper training and you see a two motion biner in a shop, maybe you think it's the thing to get.

In our programm we supply the first equipement to the students (all models, makes and sizes). During the training programm it's our stuff, but the students can buy it after the programm with a discount. That way they have a headstart with the gear and during the first year of work they don't have to buy their own PPE.

Wolter
 

NickfromWI

Well-Known Member
Oh, I side with Mangoes on this one. If you don't know what you're talking about, don't say anything until you learn. I've been in that same scenario where you know the other person is talking out of their arse...grrrrrrr

love
nick
 

Mangoes

Well-Known Member
Picked up a handsaw from that guy last week, and invited him to come out to our next rec climb that a bunch of us have done a couple times this year. He was very open to the idea, which in turn will be a great opportunity to teach/share.
 
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