Another Sketchy Pine

Discussion in 'Climber's Talk' started by climbingmonkey24, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. climbingmonkey24

    climbingmonkey24 Active Member

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    IMG_1576.JPG IMG_1579.JPG IMG_1578.JPG IMG_1548.JPG Gotta take this pine down for a friend. It's a leaner. Rather not climb all the way out to top it. I was thinking a few different things.

    1. Tie off in another pine and climb out to top it.
    2. Pull with bobcat (Not sure if this would work just because the entire tree itself wants to go the opposite way of where I need it to go.

    Pics
     
  2. climbingmonkey24

    climbingmonkey24 Active Member

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    The first picture shows the plants underneath and the second what's behind the tree. If I have to take out another pine or so to take it down that's fine too. The issue is to if it does get topped it might get hung up in the trees surrounding it.

    Climbing all the way out there is my last resort just because with that lean I rather not have to. Fixing a rigging line out there isn't an issue to, I can do that with throw line.
     
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  3. TCtreeswinger

    TCtreeswinger Well-Known Member

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    Hang it off the tree to the left in your last picture. Just be careful side loading it as you let it down. I'll take a few chunks off when thats the case
     
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  4. climbingmonkey24

    climbingmonkey24 Active Member

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    Tree in the left is actually the tree I was considering tying into. I'd like to take the top as large as possible, or pull the whole thing down if I could. Been thinking about different ideas the past week or so.
     
  5. CutHighnLetFly

    CutHighnLetFly Well-Known Member

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    You have any mechanical advantage set up at all? Like TCtreeswinger was saying, it would appear you could hang the whole.tree out of the one your thinking of trying into. Go up onto the one your keeping, set up your rigging point, kick over, the off the other.
    Then when cutting at the ground, notch toward the rigging tree and do a slow back cut, keeping up with the cut using the MA set up with a portawrap, or best case scenario a grcs (I've never had the pleasure of using one). When you can't pull it any closer into the rig tree, I typically drop cut the sucker, or cut it in a way that lets me guide it out it need be.

    Either way, you got that man.
     
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  6. climbingmonkey24

    climbingmonkey24 Active Member

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    You're saying rig the whole tree and cut it at base?

    And then what would you chunk it from the bottom up and keep lowering it as you go?
     
  7. Jehinten

    Jehinten Well-Known Member

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    Thats what their saying, just watch for the tipping point when your cutting the chunks off. At some point the weight above your tie in point will be heavier than what is below. If you take little pieces it will be easy to recognize when your getting close, at that point just lower the whole piece.

    While your up there, a second rigging rope pulled sideways and anchored to another tree would help keep the load from swinging while being lowered. A small price to pay for the security of keeping it off of any buildings.

    For what it's worth, it looked like there may be a more pressing issue in that second pic, than a leaning pine. Of course the plan may be to remove several trees including that one.
     
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  8. climbingmonkey24

    climbingmonkey24 Active Member

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    They're not worried about that big one that split and got hung up. It's not even on their property.
     
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  9. macswan

    macswan Well-Known Member

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    unless there's something I'm not seeing...
    I would rig that out off two of those other skinnys from the ground. removable blocks, grcs or 5 2 1 on at least one of them, tie the butt off to something as well so it doesn't smash stuff
     
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  10. macswan

    macswan Well-Known Member

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    and once you have the thing cradled with the two rig points you can cut chunks off the base of you cant quite lay the whole thing on the ground
     
  11. climbingmonkey24

    climbingmonkey24 Active Member

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    Gonna def. need a porta wrap or some device for this job I would say.
     
  12. CutHighnLetFly

    CutHighnLetFly Well-Known Member

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    Where you located?
     
  13. macswan

    macswan Well-Known Member

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  14. Tony

    Tony Well-Known Member

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    Seems like your gunna need more than just equipment. Get some on ground help with experience. Trust me learning this on the fly is a rough road! Only so much advice/plans can be laid out on line.

    Tony
     
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  15. rico

    rico Well-Known Member

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    That’s some sound advice there Tony. It is clear that climbingmonkey is not ready for what appears to be a very small, simple tree. I would urge him to get a job working with some pro’s for a few years and learn it from the ground up. He would drastically speed up the learning process and be a much better tree man in the end. Some advice on the inter web or a few YouTube vids can never replace the experience of working with a real pro. As far as the little pine goes why don’t you sub the job out to a good local outfit with the agreement that you will get a finders fee and get payed to work with the crew on the job. Earn while you learn!
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
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  16. Bucknut

    Bucknut Well-Known Member

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    No need to belittle the man. I agree the tree is skinny, but I wouldn't call it small.

    These are my favs. I'm always 100% confident when I'm tied into a healthy, vertical, live tree right next to the project tree. Get tied into the tall tree on the left, drop onto the leaner and go nuts.
     
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  17. Tony

    Tony Well-Known Member

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    I can’t speak for Rico, but I don’t beleive he and I know I am not trying to belittle anyone.

    The size of the tree is irrelevant. Big or small trees can be the centerpoint of a tragic incident with equality. The issue is that some straight forward options for safe efficient removal are clearly present and have been noted. Climbingmonkey asking for suggestions is fine, but having to ask allows us to glean some insight into skill level and experience.

    (Is it ironic that I can make assumptions, yet don’t allow him the luxury? Not when you consider that my assumptions, if wrong, will not cause injury or worse.)

    In my carreer as a inexperienced climber, if I walked up to that job and the crew leader said, “Tony, what do you think?”and motioned to the tree and I proposed to tie into the rear tree and get up there and cut away, as Bucknut suggests. ( A fine suggestion by the way). I would have been allowed to it.

    If I stood there and started asking many questions, without a real clue as how to do the work safely, I would have been told to step aside and watch a more experienced climber do the job.

    This is no slam to me or anyone in that position. The crew leader would simply be making an evaluation of skill and basing a decision on it. If job time permitted, I might have been given the opportunity to either accompny the climber or be talked through it while in the tree.

    I have no issue with the question, the curiosity, nor the post in general. I applaud the desire to learn and the effort put forth. However, I caution again about the lack of experience and skill level. Get some help on the ground. The experienced amoung us could list a hundred things that could go wong and cause problems, from just a few pictures. The tree, any tree, is just not worth it. They are so many safe, efficient ways to get it to the ground.

    We were all in this position at some point. In my case the internet was not an option. While an excellent sourse of good info, it will always be less than the way I learned, expereice on the ground, to help me make the decisions, develop a plan and work safely.

    I suggest using treebuzz at its most powerful. Use it to make connections. Get some good, experienced help, in person and make one of the options presented in the thread come to life, safely.

    Respectfully,

    Tony
     
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  18. rico

    rico Well-Known Member

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    It was not my intent to belittle climbingmonkey2 and I apologize if he took it that way. I was trying to point out that if he was not ready for this very simple tree he should think about working with some experienced pro's instead of seeking advice on the internet. Working under a pro has been and will continue to be the best way to gain the skills required to do this work properly.
     
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  19. southsoundtree

    southsoundtree Well-Known Member

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    You can pull the snot out of a tree with a bobcat, and wedges to back up. That's not a very heavy tree, from the looks of it.


    If you don't top the pine high, its going to take you for a ride. How are the roots? Why did it pitch over like that?
     
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  20. moss

    moss Well-Known Member

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    Great to have all the analysis and insight from everyone, of all aspects, technical felling, climber skill level, etc.

    Speaking from the point of view of an old guy who is well into 4 years of becoming a professional tree worker, with 12 years of dedicated climbing overall under my belt so-to-speak... I approach this kind of situation from a climber point of view. If I can safely and cleanly get myself right on to the the top of the leaner, I'll dissect the top with my hand saw, then work my way down the trunk, switching to my top handle saw when it makes sense. Once enough of the upper section of the tree is gone, then I go to the ground and fell it.

    As far as the climbing part goes, the approach I'm recommending would require strong SRT /multicender experience and likely two ropes coming from two different trees to provide a stable "floating" work positioning scenario. From the point of view of many of you, say 10-whatever + years of production climbing experience, you know you can get it down in an hour or less. For the learning tree worker, I always advocate take it slow, no worries about how long it takes, use a hand saw as much as is practical, stay in or on the edge of your comfort zone, not too far over it. That way mistakes are containable, don't intentionally gulp more than you can chew.
    -AJ
     

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