Amarid/technora natural crotch rigging line?

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
I've been thinking about trying a new type of lowering line for natural crotch work, which honestly is what I mostly do. My lowering rope staple is, suggested or not, NE blue core and it just gets glazed up and melts too easily. My intention is to switch to a 12 strand. There are several manufactures making 12 strand 100% technora lines. 900°f + melting point. They look a little loose (picking possibly too easily) and it's hard to find anyone advertising a price. Looks like mostly industrial sellers.
http://www.yalecordage.com/custom-and-specialty-ropes/single-braid/aracom-100
Then there is this...
http://www.yalecordage.com/custom-and-specialty-ropes/double-braid/tech-kern
But it only comes in .45 inch which to me is a little thin for rigging do to grip issues. And it's a double braid.
I want something that's going to hold up better to the abuse I dish out.
Thoughts?
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
The bare technora lines are probably not a good choice- while they have such a high melting point, they have almost no elasticity, making them easier to snap in a shock loading scenario. They also pick very easily, and can become quite difficult to tie around bark.

When it comes to rigging, elasticity is your friend. To prevent melting, I would change up technique rather than tool. If you do change a rope type, the Samson true blue suggestion was on point. There are other brands with similar options. Personally, I’m interested in putting my hands on Sasquatch to see if I think I’ll like it for rigging.
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
Get yourself some rigging rings and embrace their use. Natural crotch is quick and dirty but using rings when and where applicable will save your ropes.
I use pulleys and blocks when I need to, but the time saved setting lowering lines quickly and remotely and not needing to retrieve hardware makes it more than worth the price of an occasional rope on the bussiness side of things.
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
The bare technora lines are probably not a good choice- while they have such a high melting point, they have almost no elasticity, making them easier to snap in a shock loading scenario. They also pick very easily, and can become quite difficult to tie around bark.

When it comes to rigging, elasticity is your friend. To prevent melting, I would change up technique rather than tool. If you do change a rope type, the Samson true blue suggestion was on point. There are other brands with similar options. Personally, I’m interested in putting my hands on Sasquatch to see if I think I’ll like it for rigging.
But I dont want to change technique, lol. I haven't seen the sasquatsh, I'll look for it. True blue is in my shopping cart already.
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
How quickly are you lowering pieces? If you’re using remote rigging points in trees that are to stay, zipping loads down will not only glaze your rope, but will also cook the tree you’re rigging from.

I totally understand your reasoning, and agree that remote, natty fork rigging can be a quick solution, but it’s important to adjust technique to protect both rope and tree.
 

swingdude

De' Island Buzzer
I use pulleys and blocks when I need to, but the time saved setting lowering lines quickly and remotely and not needing to retrieve hardware makes it more than worth the price of an occasional rope on the bussiness side of things.
Hmmmm. I don't think many will agree with this. Setting up rigging for a good efficient climber is straight forward with good planning. And boy does it save you a lot of grief. An odd natty is ok but using it for a whole tree is plain painful. Get some treemaster if that is your thing or like mentioned above trueblue.....
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
How quickly are you lowering pieces? If you’re using remote rigging points in trees that are to stay, zipping loads down will not only glaze your rope, but will also cook the tree you’re rigging from.

I totally understand your reasoning, and agree that remote, natty fork rigging can be a quick solution, but it’s important to adjust technique to protect both rope and tree.
Large take downs is usually where I'm cooking ropes, not on trees that are staying up.
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
I know I can change techniques and not melt ropes. It doesn't happen all that often anyway, it's just annoying when it does. My intention with this thread is to discuss ropes, not my techniques. I have my reasons for doing what I do and that's as far as I will go discussing that in this thread.
 

TimberJack

Well-Known Member
3 strand doesnt take heat or abrasion any better then any other rope its just cheap. For me its a trust issue i like to have nice ropes i can trust. If your cooking your ropes how you trusting them?
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
3 strand doesnt take heat or abrasion any better then any other rope its just cheap. For me its a trust issue i like to have nice ropes i can trust. If your cooking your ropes how you trusting them?
If they get cooked, they get replaced. I trust my judgement gained from 17 years of high volume professional tree work with zero significant damages.
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
I just ordered a notch triple thimble. One of the reasons I do a lot of natural crotch rigging is my ground guy who does most of the rope running has a hard time with a block and porta wrap. The natural crotch gives him the friction he is used to. I know it sounds stupid that he can't easily use a fucking porta wrap, I have to deal with the people I can get. If anyone wants a job... I am hoping the triple thimble will mimic the friction he is used to without burning up my ropes. My guy is actually really good at what he is accustomed to, he just doesn't like learning new things.
 

*useless info*

Well-Known Member
Lowering fast or large weight to get that heat?
Impacting?
Pre-tighten?
Sometimes found several points high friction as less heat build up vs. 1 point.
.
Second on True Blue, always thought that was best all around, long wearing line.
Aramid family slippery,don't't hold knots as well; stronger, yet more delicate handling; very low elastic dampening as stated.
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
Melting occured while swinging large logs into a woodline and letting them run while wraped on a porta wrap. Heavy weight, friction, and high speed. Nothing around to break, just getting the logs to where they would be left.
 
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