Advice pruning Oak trees

#1
Howdy all,
Have a client who has a row of 100 year old oak trees down his driveway way about 15 of them that have taken a big hit during a recent storm.
Many of the trees have up to a third of the canopy snapped out and hung up in them.

The hangers don’t pose any immediate danger to people or property.

Generally speaking the best time to prune them is in winter when they are dormant, however it is mid summer here.

Is the best action to remove hangers and prune stubs immediately to prevent disease and decay from entering the wounds or wait till the leaves fall.
 
#3
So if I was to start remedial works on the trees ASAP that should give the trees the best chance to to start the codit process prior to shutting down for winter??

Most of my work is in eucalyptus so just trying to make sure I get my facts correct and do right by the trees and the client
 

oakwilt

Well-Known Member
#5
There are however, a few fungal threats close enough to demand measures of caution.
Guava or myrtle rust has shown an appetite for Quercus sap, which endangers live stands and is a serious threat to your eucs and most likely will mutate it's mechanisms to infect your oaks depending on which control system Australia adopts...most sterol-inhibiting chemicals are prone to stimulating disease progression further down the road from treatment programmes. They mutate characteristics in the disease.
In Texas, we had to deal with modifications of the Ceratocystis fagacearum (wilt) because of chemical vascular injections recommended initially only made the disease more virulant and deadly. This will mirror in AUS as well. You have an epidemic to look forward to therefore I'm glad of your concern.
In your chainsaw bar oil, I strongly recommend adding 1cc of Neem© oil (biologic) to a liter of lubricant. It's a preventive in small residual dosages also known to actively kill spores on contact..and it's residual effects long enough to permit CODIT response and a deterrent to insect or natural infectious attraction of the wound to infection-level exposures. It's a low LD/50 for human/animal concerns and simply makes seeping, attracting wounds 90% less appetizing to disease vectors and will neutralize present pathogenic threats for up to 72hrs, dependent on weather.
 

oakwilt

Well-Known Member
#6
Adding to that..limb breakage from trauma of weather leaves wounds much more able to seal effectively than a chainsaw cut...studies have shown. However, advocacy of "sealing wounds" has pretty much been defeating in the lab/ field studies. These failures do not reflect our work on observing vector activity after wounding in the prime season of disease virulence. Neem© has proven otherwise.
 
#7
Adding to that..limb breakage from trauma of weather leaves wounds much more able to seal effectively than a chainsaw cut...studies have shown. However, advocacy of "sealing wounds" has pretty much been defeating in the lab/ field studies. These failures do not reflect our work on observing vector activity after wounding in the prime season of disease virulence. Neem© has proven otherwise.
Are you suggesting that there is no urgency to prune and remove broken limbs??? Many of the limbs that have broken, torn off are greater than 20” diameter and have left huge scars.
 

oakwilt

Well-Known Member
#8
There is an urgency when factoring in safety, aesthetics, real value, and threats. The possibility that disease-vectoring carriers whether wind borne or pest deposited or viral or bacterial or introduced...has already occurred when those trauma happened..or soon after. You need to manage it as if infection is seeded already. I would certainly suggest you start your work. My recommendations on cuts...and some sound huge, you amend your bar oil with a contact application of a fungistatic agent that has deterrent properties too.
NEEM. Sourced from a flower. Please read-up on it as you formulate your plan. Into the bar oil. It's the minimum you can do to prep those trees if survival is the planned outcome.
 
#9
Adding to that..limb breakage from trauma of weather leaves wounds much more able to seal effectively than a chainsaw cut...studies have shown. However, advocacy of "sealing wounds" has pretty much been defeating in the lab/ field studies. These failures do not reflect our work on observing vector activity after wounding in the prime season of disease virulence. Neem© has proven otherwise.
I really like that idea for a bit of neem in your bar oil.
Could you fill me in how codit is faster in broken leaders/branches as opposed to chainsaw cuts. I've always had the school of thought to get broken, stubbed ends cut to nodes/collars to prevent decay/pathogens from moving further down or possibly into the trunk of the tree. Intresting stuff.
 
#10
I really like that idea for a bit of neem in your bar oil.
Could you fill me in how codit is faster in broken leaders/branches as opposed to chainsaw cuts. I've always had the school of thought to get broken, stubbed ends cut to nodes/collars to prevent decay/pathogens from moving further down or possibly into the trunk of the tree. Intresting stuff.

I was told that when a branch snaps or tears out the wood is severed between the cells va cutting a limb which will sever the cells
 

JD3000

Well-Known Member
#11
Matter of surface area and how strong a compartmentalizer a species is. Red oak is good, sawtooth oak, not so much.
 
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JD3000

Well-Known Member
#13
I figured it was something else but it is a long lived tree in it's native environment...how do they perform historically down there?
 
#14
I figured it was something else but it is a long lived tree in it's native environment...how do they perform historically down there?
They seem to do quite well so long as they are planted in a suitable location.
Many people seem to plant them very close to buildings, driveways etc that contribute to compaction and lack of water in the drip zone
 
#16
Really cool idea to add Neem to bar oil... What about using Neem in bar oil for all pruning as a rule? Would ya'll consider that excessive, pointless? For a guy like me who doesn't have the encyclopedic knowledge of such things, but the desire to provide the best tree care possible, it seems a bit of Neem is the least I could do... Thoughts?...
 

JD3000

Well-Known Member
#17
From a cost to benefit analysis, I would look at what the long term effect neem may have on your tools. IDK but probably minimally negative. I can give you a general cost of a neem oil product on monday
 

oakwilt

Well-Known Member
#18
Neem is soluble, has lubricating properties, hasn't shown to impair CODIT, and is as effective a contact fungicide/deterrent to insect vectors as sexually active spores.
Prior sterilizing/sanitizing tool recommendations included chlorine bleach. That's a tool killer and an oxidizing agent, doing harm to vascular tissue.
Clutch covers harbor inoculum in dust build-up. Neem incorporated in lube oil showed us no isolates were present in this unavoidable infection possibility either.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
#20
There was a thread years ago about trying to reproduce the look of a broken top or branch by using a cornet cut, leaving a jagged looking appearance rather than the regular smooth. If I remember right, the theory is nature knows best.
 
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